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Brazilians Take On Global Warming and Steal the Show PDF Print E-mail
2009 - August 2009
Written by Mark S. Langevin   
Sunday, 09 August 2009 15:20

Brazilian Amazon's jaguar Brazilians take global warming seriously, much more than the rest of the world. The recently published 2009 Pew Global Attitudes Project survey of twenty five prominent nation-states, including the United States, China, India, France, Kenya, and Poland among many others, now confirms that Brazil is now the world leader in concern over global warming.

The Pew survey reveals Brazil's highest affirmative response rate to the question: Is global warming a serious problem?  90 percent of Brazilians think so, by far the highest proportion of any country in the study.  Argentina ranks second with 69 percent, the U.S. response is well behind at 44%, and China is last in this survey with only 30 percent of the respondents troubled by greenhouse gas emissions. 

Since the election of President Lula in 2002, Brazilians have become increasingly aware of national and global environmental problems, from the impact of land use practices in the Cerrado to deforestation in the Amazon.

President Lula told Reuters that Brazil was open to adopting targets for greenhouse gas reductions, "the issue is not a taboo for us.", thus reflecting the national preoccupation with global warming and all but reversing the country's adamant opposition to adopting emission reduction targets.

Brazilians did not always share such a unique perspective on the global warming challenge.  Before Lula's election, only 20 percent of the population expressed concern for the environment according to the Pew Center.  By 2007 this number had jumped to 49%, the largest increase of the survey.  According to Larry Rohter of the New York Times,

"The factors behind the re-evaluation range from a drought here in the Amazon rain forest, the world's largest, and the impact that it could have on agriculture if it recurs, to new phenomena like a hurricane in the south of Brazil. As a result, environmental advocates, scientists and some politicians say, Brazilian policy makers and the public they serve are increasingly seeing climate change not as a distant problem, but as one that could affect them too."

Climate change is now front and center in Brazil.  Members of Congress from all political parties race to affiliate with the environmental caucus and co-sponsor "green" legislation.  The former Minister of the Environment under Lula, Workers Party Senator and former Amazon rubber tapper, Marina Silva, is now considering an invitation from the Green Party to run as their presidential nominee in 2010. 

Even S.O.S. Mata Atlântica, a prominent environmental advocacy organization, is running humorous television ads asking Brazilians to "piss in the shower" to save millions of liters of fresh water in a campaign to preserve the Atlantic coast's dwindling rainforest.

Dare to compare Brazil with the U.S.?

During the same period from 2002 to 2007, the U.S. level of environmental concern rose from 23 to 37 percent, but alarm over global warming decreased from 47 percent in 2007 to 44 in 2009 as the economy crumbled. Although President Obama and the Democratic Party passed the controversial American Clean Energy and Security Act of 2009 (known as Waxman-Markey) in the House of Representatives by a very close vote; efforts to pass a climate change bill in the Senate face stiff opposition. 

In fact, the ranking Republican member of the key Environment and Public Works committee responsible for developing climate change legislation, Senator James Inhofe of Oklahoma, doubts the scientific findings of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) which jointly won the Nobel Peace Prize with former U.S. Vice-President Al Gore in 2007.  In 2003 Sen. Inhofe remarked that global warming was the "greatest hoax ever perpetrated on the American people."

Of course, there are other countries in the Pew Center survey that also play down the threat of global warming, including the very large greenhouse gas emitters China and Canada, yes Canada!  However, the public opinion gap between Brazil and the U.S. may prove to be a major obstacle in galvanizing international cooperation to reduce emissions.

48 percent of Brazilians are willing to pay higher prices (for energy, food, etc.) to address global warming, compared to only 41 percent for the U.S. Even more interesting, 79 percent of Brazilians are willing to tolerate slower economic growth and job creation to protect the environment compared to 64 percent for the U.S. 

With respect to who is most trusted to deal with global warming, 57 percent of U.S. citizens believe the U.S. is the most trustworthy while only 17 percent of Brazilians place their faith in U.S. leadership. Of the countries studied, only Israel, Kenya, and Nigeria place more than 40 percent confidence in the U.S. on climate matters. 

Even more telling, Brazil ranks high in the list of countries who blame the U.S. for global warming.  49 percent of the Brazilians single out the U.S. Only Turkey and Bangladesh (61%), Spain (56%), Venezuela and Slovakia (55%), France (53%), and Indonesia (52%) surpass Brazil suspicions.  Evidently, these numbers partially reflect the animosity unleashed by President George W. Bush's withdrawal from the Kyoto Protocol in 2001.

Brazil's recent and very rapid increase in public awareness stands in sharp contrast with the partisan rancor and controversy surrounding U.S. efforts to confront global warming. Moreover, Brazilians about-face is now bearing down on domestic policy making. The government's Prevention and Control of Deforestation in the Amazon (PPCDAM) got off to a slow start, but is now showing measurable results. 

No doubt this effort has its critics, but Brazil's National Institute for Space Research confirms that the rate of Amazon deforestation is slowing.  Also, the current Minister of the Environment, Carlos Minc, announced in June that President Lula himself would directly participate in efforts to stop deforestation by visiting Amazon communities involved in sustainable production.  Even Brazil's Army is joining the campaign to stop deforestation!

These efforts highlight Brazil's broader commitment to protect the Amazon and play a leading role in climate change negotiations at Copenhagen. They are now coupled with international campaigns to diminish the external threats to the rainforest. Greenpeace's recent campaign, "Slaughtering the Amazon," has already pressured such companies as Nike to "certify" that leather used in the company's products does not come from cattle herding in the Amazon. 

Taken together, Brazilians' concern with global warming, the Lula administration's increasing commitment to stop deforestation, international efforts, such as the Amazon Fund, to assist the country with sustainable development in the Amazon, and Brazil's historic leadership of the G-77 nations in climate change talks add up to a prominent position at this year's Conference of the Parties to the United Nations Framework on Climate Change negotiations in Copenhagen or COP15.  Indeed, the U.S. Climate Change envoy, Todd Stern, recently visited Brasilia for talks with the government and remarked,

"And I think that an issue like this, which is of enormous importance to the world ... is an ideal opportunity for Brazil to demonstrate leadership on the global stage. And if you want to be a global player, that's what you have to do."

According to the Pew Center, over 180 million Brazilians have weighed in are now ready to take the stage and steal the show.

Mark S. Langevin, Ph.D., is Director of BrazilWorks (www.brazilworks.org),  adjunct Associate Professor of Government and Politics at the University of Maryland-University College, and Associate Researcher at the Political Studies Laboratory of the Federal University of Espírito Santo, Brazil.  He researches and writes on U.S.-Brazil relations.  He can be contacted at mark.brazilworks@gmail.com.



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Comments (43)Add Comment
Mark Langevin
written by João da Silva, August 09, 2009
Brazilians did not always share such a unique perspective on the global warming challenge. Before Lula's election, only 20 percent of the population expressed concern for the environment according to the Pew Center. By 2007 this number had jumped to 49%, the largest increase of the survey. According to Larry Rohter of the New York Times,


You are right, Dr.Langevin. Mr.Lula is the driving force behind in educating the Brasilians about the effects of Global warming and the strategy to confront and correct them. 20% to 49% ? A phenomenal increase, I must say. Congrats for bringing up this important fact to the attention of the Readers-at-Large of this News magazine.

BTW, is Larry Rohter still in Brasil?
...
written by Gringo, August 09, 2009
Good to hear, and congrats on a great article. Brazilians should be very concerned about GW since it will be nations like Brazil that will bear the brunt of the extremes to come if future predictions are even remotely accurate. Sadly, it will be nation's like the US and China that will inevitably affect the outcome of measures taken, so I'm not holding my breathe that anything of note will be done in the foreseeable future.

Even S.O.S. Mata Atlântica, a prominent environmental advocacy organization, is running humorous television ads asking Brazilians to "piss in the shower" to save millions of liters of fresh water in a campaign to preserve the Atlantic coast's dwindling rainforest.


This has gone international, I saw it mentioned on the O'Really factor on FOX news (not that I regularly watch that show). I don't quite agree with pissing in the showing to conserve water (why not the ole, "if it's yellow let it mellow" routine instead?), that said, Kudos to SOS for another brilliant media spot - they certainly know how to get people talking.
Brazilians are liers!!!
written by Matheus Braz, August 09, 2009
I am brazilian and the only that I can say is: Brazilians are liers!!! Almost of all Brazilians don't know global warming and don't care about the environment. We don't use ecobags, we don't recycle, we destroy the amazon, we build port and airport in biodiversity locations. And our president, LULA, is an idiot and in last month he sign a low that give amazon aereas to pecuarist and exploitative. SO WE DON'T CARE ABOUT CLIMATE CHANGE, DON'T BELIEVE IN THIS ARTICLE!!!
Are you kidding me?
written by Matheus Braz, August 09, 2009
You can see how brazilians don't concern in tih website: WWW.PORTOSULNAO.COM.BR
Matheus Braz
written by João da Silva, August 09, 2009
Brazilians are liers!!!


I had a look at your Website, which is very interesting.A pity that it is only in Portuguese. However, the reasons for the "Porto Sul" seem to reinforce my theory (and that of many others) that we are consolidating our position as "Commodity Exporters".

I request that our fellow Brazilian bloggers (as well as bilingual gringo bloggers) such as Mr.Amaral, Mr. Severus, etc; look at your site and express their opinions.

All the best in your campaign "Porto Sul Não".
90 percent.....
written by asp, August 10, 2009
maybe its the other ten percent that are responsible for the damage...

until the world addresses cow farts and rice production, they are just bsing about it...

this has been a rigorous winter in the south, i could use a little global warming...
Research Design and Methods
written by Mark Langevin, August 10, 2009
While I don't doubt that folks misreport their opinions, the comparative nature of Pews research design, plus the probability sampling technique even out misreport across countries and to some extent, even within Brazil (with a 3% margin of error).

For those interested in the 2009 report see http://pewglobal.org/reports/pdf/264.pdf


For those interested in the research design:

About the 2009 Pew Global Attitudes Survey
Results for the survey are based on telephone and face-to-face interviews conducted under the
direction of Princeton Survey Research Associates International. All surveys are based on national samples except in Brazil, China, India, and Pakistan where the samples were disproportionately urban.

The table below shows the margin of sampling error based on all interviews conducted in that
country. For results based on the full sample in a given country, one can say with 95% confidence that the error attributable to sampling and other random effects is plus or minus the margin of error. In addition to sampling error, one should bear in mind that question wording and practical difficulties in conducting surveys can introduce error or bias into the findings of opinion polls.

Country: Brazil
Sample design: Probability
Mode: Face-to-face adults 18 plus
Languages: Portuguese
Fieldwork dates: May 18 - June 14, 2009
Sample size: 813
Margin of Error: 3%
Representative: Disproportionately urban (the sample is 95% urban, Brazil’s population is 82% urban). Non-metro
areas were under-represented. The sample represents roughly 44% of the adult population.
asp
written by João da Silva, August 10, 2009
maybe its the other ten percent that are responsible for the damage...


Acertou certinho, Irmão. smilies/wink.gif

this has been a rigorous winter in the south, i could use a little global warming...


Prepare to spend the month of August underneath your sleeping bag. smilies/cry.gif
Wait a second, wait a second !
written by ch.c., August 10, 2009
1)The Pew reports clearly states IT WAS A QUESTION TO PEOPLE, NOT ACTION FROM PEOPLE, COMPANIES OR GOVERNKMENT !

2) The report is also somewhat funny in the sense that as per the article, KENYA AND POLAND ARE PROMINENT NATIONS !
Quite a laughable disinformation .... obviously.
Why not include then also Ecuador, Haiti as PROMINENT nations ?

Facts are that Brazil on a total GDP comparison basis are polluting the air much more than the USA ! Sorry...true reality !

Another reality is that a cattle produces a lot more air pollution than a car. Thus more damaging to the global warming than a car exhausts !
And to my knowledge Brazil has 200 millions cattles.

Thus let me applaude Matheus.
But where he is wrong is that he mix up soil pollution with air pollution ! And the Pew report talk only about air pollution CONCERNS, not soil or ocean pollution ACTIONS !!!!!
Quite known that Brazil put most of its untreated waste waters STRAIGHT to the ocean and the country has many thousands of uncared, unprotected, and untreated DUMP SITES !!!!!
Finally all Brazilians cities are very much DIRTY...with roads covered with uncollected TRASHES !!!! And most of whatever is collected just end up in DUMP SITES, and are not treated, burned or whatever !
And the air is very much polluted and even smelly in the Brazilian urban cities !


You are even building now 5 new oil refineries so that you could export
gasoline to the USA. And it is good...for the USA to import part pf their gasoline needs, because refineries pollute the air and environement, especially the low tech refineries Brazil are building !
And one of this new refinery is built right to a Maranho port, Is that state not IN THE AMAZON ???????
And why do you believe the USA have NOT built ONE new refinery on their soil during the last 30 years ?
Due to lack of money ? Lack of technology ?
Nooooo but..... due to environmental concerns !
And Brazil doesnt care at all for their own environmental concerns.

Hmmmmmm !
I cant stop.... smilies/grin.gif smilies/grin.gif smilies/grin.gif smilies/grin.gif smilies/grin.gif smilies/grin.gif smilies/grin.gif smilies/grin.gif smilies/grin.gif smilies/grin.gif smilies/grin.gif
Ohhhh and furthermore....... on cattle herds :
written by ch.c., August 10, 2009
Brazil human population 200 millions
Cattle herd 200 millions

USA human population 300 millions
Cattle herd 101,8 millions, a 36 years low as per USDA estimates on July 1st, 2009 !!!

Keep growing your cattle, swine and chicken herd !
So that we will keep importing PART of your production but leaving to you YOUR soil and air pollution !
This is exactly what Globalization is !
Have the others produce the most polluting goods... and let them POLLUTE...... THEIR AIR AND SOIL !
No difference with refined oil products, steels etc etc !
And if you are not price competitive, Nooooo problem, developed nations will move the production...ELSEWHERE...in another country.
Hmmmmmmm smilies/cheesy.gif smilies/cheesy.gif smilies/cheesy.gif smilies/cheesy.gif
per capita emissions
written by Mark Langevin, August 10, 2009
I can't comment on the entire critique, but on the basic fact of greenhouse gas emissions per capita, including land use (which includes deforestation) Brazil ranks very low, 87th, where as the U.S. ranks very high, about 7th amongst all countries, and depending on the year, but really Brazil is not a great per capita polluter, it does rank high, say 4th among all emitters, or 5th among all emitters in a historical sense, but this is largely due to agriculture and deforestation, not transportation or electricity generation.
See http://www.eoearth.org/article/ Greenhouse_gas_emissions~_perspectives_on_the_top_20_em
itters_and_developed_versus_developing_nations

Now about those refineries, I don't dispute the facts reported in the contribution above and we should all be concerned fossil fuels in the transportation sector. Rather, the faster we bury the relevancy of the pre-sal discoveries (replacing renewables with fossil) the better.
...
written by Manda Chuva, August 10, 2009
I don't dispute the facts reported in the contribution above


You call that a "Contribution"?
Brazil ranks very low, 87th, where as the U.S. ranks very high, but really Brazil is not a great per capita polluter, it does rank high, say 4th among all emitters, or 5th among all emitters in a his
written by ch.c., August 11, 2009
Yesssssssss.....but....but.....adjust these numbers on a TOTAL POLLUTION COMPARED TO THE GDP and you get Brazil as a Very very high polluter ! Or said otherwise : total pollution against total output.

Let me explain :
- if in country A, the GDP is let say 100 and pollution of let say 10, and country B has a GDP of 15 and pollution of 3.
- who pollutes the most...comparatively and relatively ? Country A or B ?

Fact remains that pollution should be based on A PER OUTPUT BASIS AND NOTHING ELSE ! This is where Brazil and most emerging nations dont want to take in account, on purpose obviously. Guess why. And this is why the USA have not signed the Kyoto accord saying it should be based on A PER OUTPUT BASIS...as I stated above !

As to the sources you provided, the stats are based on 2000 levels.
By now China pollutes (total pollution) More than the USA but....but...but.....Not Even a Third of the USA GDP !
And despite they more or less have a similar (but China having the highest) total pollution.
Now, do the same maths with Brazil and you should easily find out that Brazil pollutes MORE than the USA on a total ouput comparison and the USA are still always the one being finger pointed.....UNFAIRLY !

Sorry to underline it once more but pollution should be COMPARED TO THE TOTAL OUPUT AND NOTHING ELSE.
And this is exactly what emerging nations DONT WANT TO COMPARE, ON PURPOSE. Guess why....once more !

smilies/cheesy.gif smilies/grin.gif
Like it or not...
written by Isso, August 11, 2009
Ch.C. is correct.
Energy Intensity
written by Mark Langevin, August 11, 2009
Ok, point scored, but your point is a bit misleading.
According to the World Bank's Little Green Data Book, Brazil scores 7.3 in GDP per unit of energy use or what you would call output, and the U.S. scores 5.5, considerably lower, due in part to the technology gap between the two countries in manufacturing and energy efficiency. But your point doesn't really paint the whole story, since Brazil's energy use per capita is much less, a 1 to 7 ratio with the U.S. on the average use of oil used per capita. Electric power consumption repeats the patter, with Brazil's 2,060 kilowatts per person versus the U.S.' 13,564. Lastly, and possibly most importantly for global warming, Brazilian electricity production utilizes only 9.8% fossil fuels whereas the U.S. uses a whopping 71.3% and this is likely to increase in the coming years according the U.S. energy administration.

So yes, Brazil's productive output per person uses more energy, but this is an argument for more technological cooperation to "clean up" middle and lower income countries, but not a great argument that Brazil is a culprit in global warming. In fact, if we factor in land use and deforestation, then we must also examine how these activities have also benefited those in the U.S. and Europe who now make a living, or at least some psychic income, throwing stones at Brazil and the burning of the Amazon. Maybe all of us should consider making a contribution to the Amazon Fund and take responsibility for deforestation in Brazil. Who is willing to match my contribution?
...
written by Manda Chuva, August 11, 2009
Who is willing to match my contribution?


Depends on how much you are willing to contribute.

BTW, Mr.ch.c is talking about pollution vs GDP and his analysis is terrific, to the point and not misleading at all. On the other hand, you are talking about GDP vs Energy Consumption.
Documenting Pollution
written by Mark Langevin, August 11, 2009
Caro Manda Chuva,

Ch.c. provides a description, but does not document his claims, so until he does I can only refer to the emissions problem, and certainly Brazil has one.

I don't doubt that Brazil has pollution and waste (Ch.c. or you think it is important, then document your claims so that others can know what you know), but the focus here is on global warming and what Brazilians think about it. Does it make a difference that over 60% more Brazilians are worried about the environment than in 2002? I think it makes a big difference, but the policy and its outcomes trail what good folks want from their representatives.

Abs,

Marco
Mark Langevin
written by Manda Chuva, August 11, 2009
Carissmo Marquinho,

I don't doubt that Brazil has pollution and waste (Ch.c. or you think it is important, then document your claims so that others can know what you know), but the focus here is on global warming and what Brazilians think about it. Does it make a difference that over 60% more Brazilians are worried about the environment than in 2002?


The Brazilians are getting more conscious about the environment, not because of the current Headman as you stated in your comment:

Since the election of President Lula in 2002, Brazilians have become increasingly aware of national and global environmental problems, from the impact of land use practices in the Cerrado to deforestation in the Amazon.


You seem to be giving lot more credit to HIM than he deserves.

I don't doubt that Brazil has pollution and waste (Ch.c. or you think it is important, then document your claims so that others can know what you know),


If you had taken a moment to answer Mr.Ch.c´s question on country A or B correctly, you wouldn't need us to document our "claims". Also, if your knowledge or Portuguese is BASIC, you would have taken the trouble of going through the website Matheus Braz recommended, you would understand our "claims" better.

Abs

Manda Chuva
ch.c
written by João da Silva, August 11, 2009
Never before in the history of this blog, you have received compliments from so many Brasilians, Comrade!!!!!! How do you feel about it? I am LMAO!!!!

Oh, btw, my compliments for assuming a new Avtar in the name of "Manda Chuva" smilies/cheesy.gif smilies/grin.gif smilies/cool.gif

You are incorrigible!!!!!!!
Beleave me!
written by Matheus Braz, August 12, 2009
I am 15 years old and I study in a privade school in ILHÉUS, BAHIA, BRASIL. I can say about my classmates: 50 students(including me), 40(80%) know something about global warming, 30(60%) are concerned in this issue, but only 5(10%)do something to reduce human impact in nature!Me and my classmates have almost the best study of Brazil and we represent 15% Brazil's population! Imagine the other brazilians! WE ARE NOT CONCERNED ABOUT THE ENVIRONMENT! And probably our president, LULA, know less than me and my classmates!
Matheus Braz
written by Manda Chuva, August 12, 2009
I am 15 years old


For a 15 year old kid, you have lots of guts! With youngsters like you, Brasil still has hopes!!

BTW, I went through your website. Did the 5 (10%) in your class build it? Regardless, I am very proud of you , the 10% as well as the 15% you mentioned!!! Keep up the good work.
No this is not my website!
written by Matheus Braz, August 12, 2009
Sorry, but I didn't do this website. I was publishing this great job of an ilheense, I think his name is something like gutenberg. I appreciate your interest in our campaign "PORTO SUL NÃO". You can see more about this campaign in this website: www.acaoilheus.org
Thanks for publishing and you should continue!
Prabens!
written by Mark Langevin, August 12, 2009
Caro Matheus, prabens pela pesquisa, muito legal mesmo!

But here is the catch, sampling is a science, and we can only trust random samples..now the Pew Center's study isn't totally random,it's skewed toward urban areas for convenience sake,but since Brazil is now an urban country, we can have some confidence... but for a small sample, conveniently chosen, we really can't trust the results, although they are very interesting... keep up the survey!

Now, about Manda Chuva and Ch.c. insistence, prabens... I like the website, and if you knew me well, you'll invite me to the next demonstration... I'm not a fan of the local growth coalition sem limites. But seriously, my article is about one study that clearly shows a dramatic change in Brazilian public opinion, a change that corresponds to the Lula administration...yes, it might be pure coincidence, but seriously, I doubt it, something is going on and I have a sense it is the success of the government endorsed Forum on Climate Change which has promoted civil society and its concerns about global warming. Although I admire Lula and have met him a couple of times, that's beside the point, Brazil has 180 million citizens,and many of them have worked hard, through parties and organizations, to move the country toward a prosperous, peaceful, and low carbon future... and that I really admire, much more than one individual.

Now the real question is what to do with Pre-Sal, how ironic that Brazil has made such progress and now finds itself chock full of oil!

Over and out!
Mark
Mark Langevin
written by Manda Chuva, August 12, 2009
But here is the catch, sampling is a science, and we can only trust random samples..


Not in Mathues´s case, old chap. He conducted the survey among 100% of the "Universe". ie his "Universe" consisted of his class mates. Probably, made a questionnaire and circulated among his class mates who were not required to identify themselves. Matheus doesn't seem to be a kid who misleads others with fudged data. He seems to be one hell of a blunt Brasilian!!! Probably among the 15% he cited.

Although I admire Lula and have met him a couple of times, that's beside the point,


How wonderful you have met him. Did you give him a lecture about "Random Sampling"? smilies/wink.gif
last word
written by Mark Langevin, August 13, 2009
Manda Chuva,

I respectfully award you the last word.

Now, about that beer...

Abs,

Mark
...
written by Manda Chuva, August 13, 2009
I respectfully award you the last word.


Your surrender accepted!

Now, about that beer...


The Geneva Conventions were modified recently and our POWs are entitled for a 12 pack per day. smilies/cheesy.gif
...
written by Matheus Braz, August 13, 2009
Os governos de todo o mundo estabeleceram metas modestas para reduzir o aquecimento global até 2050. Cientistas e especialistas de todo mundo começam a se reunir em Belo Horizonte, entre os dias 4 e 7 de agosto, para formar uma coalizão global para propor medidas mais efetivas e reduzir o prazo para 2020. A humanidade pode agir para evitar um risco sem precedentes para sua sobrevivência. É preciso começar agora.
WE HAVE TO START NOW OR NOW!
Matheus Braz
written by Manda Chuva, August 13, 2009
Cientistas e especialistas de todo mundo começam a se reunir em Belo Horizonte, entre os dias 4 e 7 de agosto, para formar uma coalizão global para propor medidas mais efetivas e reduzir o prazo para 2020.


You were too late to post this info, Son. 7 de agosto was 6 days ago!

But I think that you should write an essay in this magazine about this issue either in Portugués or English. A good title would be "Porto Sul Não".
Mark Langevin AND ALL
written by Forrest Allen Brown, August 14, 2009
waste energy , burning of the cane for harvest .
burning of land to clear the amazon .
just people burning trash, cooking food
making bricks
the making of charcol .

none of thies hever ever been studied for there impact on the countrys
heat index.

not to even start talking about the rew sewage cooking off in the rivers and small ponds all over brasil .

then how about all the raw sewage dumped by your city states like SP RIO just in the ocean and rivers un treated .
temp of water goes up as turbity goes up

JOAO in on marusius

Disagreement with Rosy Picture
written by Augustus, August 14, 2009
While I must concur that Brazil is far from the position of Worse Polluters of our Planet (and could never be comparable to China, USA, and – surprisingly, according to BBC data – Australia), and although I have not lived in the country for several years, I must strongly disagree with the author’s unrealistic rosy depiction of an Environmentally Friendly Brazil.

Just thinking of two examples, namely Cubatao (in Greater Sao Paulo metropolitan area) and the waters of Guanabara Bay (in Rio de Janeiro), suffice to indicate how carelessly irresponsible have Brazilians behaved throughout the nation’s 20th Century history…
Forrest
written by João da Silva, August 14, 2009
JOAO in on marusius


Great to hear from you from Mauritius, Forrest. Supposed to be a beautiful place. How is the water there?

If you have taken pictures of that place, would appreciate your e-mailing me some of the best shots. How long are you planning on staying over there?

BTW, your comments and that of Augustus are very accurate and so are of Matheus.I went through the website the youngster mentioned and sure, an interesting campaign is going on in BA.
"Until one has loved an animal, part of their soul remains unawakened."
written by forrest allen brown, August 14, 2009
why not the planet
The fact is:
written by Gil Serique, August 14, 2009
We Brazilians may have gotten more awared of GW and other environ issues, but the fact is that we acting less and even promoting far more destruction than ever. My hometown of Santarem gets more and more mega-projects that disrespect and cause amazing damages to nature, namely mining for whatever minerals china, usa, uk, japan ...need; raising more cattle, hydroeletric projects, increasing water buffalo herds in the floodplain, grain fields replacing rainforest...you got it!

...
written by Chico Mendez, August 15, 2009
Maybe all of us should consider making a contribution to the Amazon Fund and take responsibility for deforestation in Brazil. Who is willing to match my contribution?


That's a good one. Wonder where that money will end up?

Why doesn't everyone just go to the Amazon and try to stop deforestation?

Like Dorothy Stang. smilies/shocked.gif
Global Warming
written by david stang, August 15, 2009
Speaking positively enouracges people however reality and fact check have importance also. My sister Dorothy Stang was murdered Feb. 12, 2004 in the Amazon for trying to help the Brazilian Federal Government develop Sustainable Farming through their agencies INCRA and IBAMA. The result was constant betrayal, corruption within the agencies, lack of funding and good supervision of the government of these agencies, corruption of the Judicial System, and overwhelming power of the Plantation Ranchers, Loggers, and Soy Bean Producers to make short term profits with no sense of long term financial gain.The Powerful Consortium that most people in the Amazon feel every day and know exists wants slavery or cheap labor. There is a very important movie in Portuguese, Spanish and English called "They Killed Sister Dorothy" that challenges the systems that are destroying the Amazon and the Rights of People to Develop. This Woman Dorothy Stang who was 73 when she was murdered was a Catholic Sister who gave 30 years of her life to help the Poor Develop and Developed two enormous Projects of Sustainable Development only to be betrayed and ignored and insulted by the Judicial System. The alleged two who planned her murder who have been jailed twice are now free. What message does give to the other killers in the Amazon. Over 800 farmers have been murdered in the Amazon with no justice. What message does this give to those who believe in Global Warming and the future of the Amazon?
David Stang
Global Warming
written by david stang, August 15, 2009
Sorry Dorothy was murdered Feb. 12th 2005. I had a senior moment.
David Stang
Mark Langevin
written by Manda Chuva, August 15, 2009
What is your answer to David Stang´s comments, old chap?
...
written by Chico Mendez, August 16, 2009
The result was constant betrayal, corruption within the agencies, lack of funding and good supervision of the government of these agencies, corruption of the Judicial System, and overwhelming power of the Plantation Ranchers, Loggers, and Soy Bean Producers to make short term profits with no sense of long term financial gain.The Powerful Consortium that most people in the Amazon feel every day and know exists wants slavery or cheap labor.


Unfortunately David, that's just not the Amazon, that's the entirety of Brazil. Your sisters plight is just a microcosm of what happens all over this country in regards to the denial of human rights and the systemic corruption that invades every aspect of life in Brazil.

What happened to your sister was a tragedy and even moreso the resulting attempts at "justice". Hopefully one day those responsible will have to account for their actions on this earth.

"And with what measure ye mete, it shall be meausured out to you."
Thanks David
written by Mark Langevin, August 16, 2009
Dear Brazzil readers and David Stang,

Thank you all for turning this thread into an important discussion of the Amazon and all of our respective responsibilities. I want to especially thank David for keeping up the good fight, helping all of us understand the cause of Dorothy and so many who have given their lives for sustainable development, peace and justice.

My article points out an important shift in public opinion in Brazil, a shift that accelerated as Brazilians came to know and better understand Dorothy, her cause, and the forces behind her assassination in 2005. In the mid-1990s I made modest efforts to inform the United States about the situation of landless rural workers in Brazil, and the deeply disturbing massacres at Eldorado dos Carajas and Corumbiara. After Dorothy’s assassination, I worked voluntarily as National Organizer of the Brazil Strategy Network to assist with efforts to press forward with the cause of justice and hold the judicial branch accountable for a timely, effective prosecution of the crime. On April 17, 2006 I co-signed, as National Organizer of the Brazil Strategy Network, along with David and hundreds of individuals and organizations, a letter drafted by the RFK Human Rights Memorial and Emily Goldman and addressed to President Lula. The letter called for the Brazilian federal government to forcefully address the issue of impunity with respect to violence against those who defend the rights of the rural landless and sustainable development, including Sister Dorothy Stang. See the letter at:
http://www.rfkmemorial.org/human_rights/2001_Frigo/LulaLetter17Apr06.pdf
The work of Dorothy, and now David, to press on to defend human rights and the conservation of the Amazon in Brazil is now showing results. Certainly the rapid change in public opinion is both a reflection of this work and an open door for those who are working to transform Brazilian public policy and development practices. More and more Brazilians want sustainable development, not the jungle capitalism steeped in blood as the killers of Dorothy advocate. The negotiations to extend and amend the Kyoto Protocol of the United Nations Framework on Climate Change, as well as the Lula administration’s establishment of the Amazon Fund, among other innovative policies, create an unprecedented moment for Brazilians to distinguish their nation.
However, although public opinion can rapidly shift, especially following the front page stories of Dorothy’s assassination and David’s tireless efforts to bring the murderers to justice, democratic public policy cannot. We have to be patient, but persistent in our support of sustainability; understanding that the problems of the Amazon are truly global, but that the solution ultimately rests with Brazilian democracy and its citizens.

We can rant (I have certainly ranted my fair share), but that is just sucking oxygen out of the air; or we can join David, we can work to ensure that the Amazon Fund works to finance sustainable development, and we can call out those politicians, those corporations, and those international financial institutions whose work stands in bloody contrast to the work inspired by Dorothy.

David how can we help?

For those living in Brazil, such organizations as S.O.S. Mata Atlantica and Porto Sul Não www.acaoilheus.org, are important opportunities to force the issue. Indeed, I’m impressed with the Forum Brasileiro de Mudanças Climáticas http://www.forumclima.org.br/default.asp as an important avenue for connecting the dots between the private sector, civil society, and the government to forge ahead with sustainable development policies, especially those that treat the Amazon.

Also, we should not underestimate the work of the Amazon state governors who are moving ahead rather quickly with efforts to develop a framework for preserving the Amazon through fee for environmental services, yes a compromise with large landowners, but one that can work with the right policies. Yes, it’s easy to criticize the soy farmers and cattle ranchers, but it is much harder to negotiate a viable, sustainable development framework with them. Yet, nobody said this was going to be easy, and Dorothy’s thirty year struggle to save the Amazon and its peoples can only continue if we negotiate through the private interests to make a public policy that works.

Oh, and about private individual contributions to the Amazon Fund, BNDES is now working on it and as soon as they get back to me, I'll forward it one to the readers of Brazzil.

On final thanks for Rodney Melo who makes our Brazzil community possible.
how about all
written by Forrest Allen Brown, August 17, 2009
the drug farms set up by the farc along with there training camps .
the illeagle gold miners .
slave trade from all over the south going to chaves land then shiped out to his arab friends .

i here young latin women are sold over and over in the land of mohamad
Mark Langevin
written by Manda Chuva, August 17, 2009
On final thanks for Rodney Melo who makes our Brazzil community possible.


Is it a valedictory note, Marco?

Oh, and about private individual contributions to the Amazon Fund, BNDES is now working on it and as soon as they get back to me, I'll forward it one to the readers of Brazzil.


BNDES is working on it? Great news. smilies/wink.gif
david stang , my sympathies to you for the senceless killing of dorthy stang
written by asp, August 17, 2009
i did see a docu on tv down here in brazil about that case and other problems with the land there. that might be the film you are talking about...

its important to seperate the real unjustices going on there , the slavery , the violence against people calling for help for the people etc, from mst and chalotons from out of the country going under the banner of save the amazon...it is not a cut and dried situation

and i mean its very important...

there was a report about a guy from europe owning a huge amount of land in the amazon and going under the banner of protecting the amazon, and he was actualy destroying it for his profit. this kind of thing generates huge distrust in foreigners trying to get involved...and i suggest any foreigner who wants to get involved needs to seriously step with caution and research very carefully the situation the might be going into

and, any movement that is worth supporting should distance itself far from mst. one of the massacers that was spoken about was done after a violent charge on a police line by mst. its hard to imagine any police force in the world not reacting violently at this mst action.

mst leads with flawed marxism,they are full of tired dogma , use intimidation and violence. and stick their noses in places that they dont even belong. like protesting outside of the american embassy in brasilia after 9/11. one of the people sitting on the ground in protest was asked why he was doing it, he answered, he didnt even know, they just told him to come there and he was hungry...

they are a very bad group to hook up with or associate in any way. as any marx group does, they play on the poverty and hunger and exploitation of the people there and then mix in there stupid brand of marxist concepts to deal with the situation.they study in cuba and have had farc people hang with them

good luck on you alls endeavers
respond this topic
written by Chasity19Pacheco, August 07, 2010
I took my first home loans when I was 32 and this aided my relatives very much. Nevertheless, I need the short term loan once more time.

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