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Twenty-five Years of Presidential Leadership in Brazil PDF Print E-mail
2012 - April 2012
Written by Ted Goertzel   
Friday, 20 April 2012 13:46

Fernando Henrique Cardoso How much credit should Brazil's presidents get for its remarkable progress since the return to democracy in 1985? Elections have been conducted smoothly, the economy has grown, poverty and inequality have declined and social indicators are improving. Did Brazil succeed because of its presidents or in spite of them? Or because of some and in spite of others?

Two presidents, Fernando Henrique Cardoso (1995-2002) and Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva (2003-2010), are often praised for their contributions. The others, José Sarney (1995-1990), Fernando Collor de Mello (1990-1992), and Itamar Franco (1992-1994) are not so frequently applauded. Indeed, Collor de Mello was impeached. But their contributions may have been underappreciated.

In 1985, Brazilians overwhelmingly elected Tancredo Neves, the leading opposition candidate. He was a 75 year old traditional politician who had learned his craft from Getúlio Vargas and Juscelino Kubitschek, two of the country's most renowned presidents. He was not a charismatic figure, but a reassuring one, who had been chosen in part because the military could live with him.

Would Tancredo guide the nation back to the authoritarian ways of Vargas or the inflationary ones of Kubitschek? Would he develop a vision of a new Brazil and inspire the Congress and the bureaucracy to implement it? We will never know because he died of natural causes a few weeks before his inauguration.

The presidency fell to the vice-president elect, José Sarney, a moderate who had been chosen to balance the ticket. Sarney came from an oligarchic family and had supported the generals for most of the two decades of military rule. He certainly seemed like the wrong person in the wrong place at the wrong time. But, watched over carefully by the Congress, Sarney rose to the occasion.

Brazil's main accomplishment during Sarney's term was drafting and passing a new constitution. The constitutional convention included the entire legislature, and they worked together constructively. Every interest group in the country mobilized to make sure its rights were given constitutional protection, and most were accommodated.

The resulting constitution was unwieldy and promised things the country didn't have the resources to deliver. It needed a lot of amendment in later years. But it provided a legitimate framework for a democratic system. Two of the important leaders in the convention were later elected president of Brazil: Fernando Henrique Cardoso and Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva.

Sarney's main contribution was to allow the convention to do its work, and to step down voluntarily when his term ended. These virtues should not be underestimated in a world plagued by "presidents for life" who dominate their societies and suffocate independent initiative. Sometimes the best thing a leader can do is step back and allow others to take the initiative.

Theorist Bruce Tuckman found that groups go through four developmental stages: forming, storming, norming, and performing. During the forming stage, groups depend on the authority of the leader. A charismatic leader is needed at this stage. But to develop fully a group or a country needs to assert its independence from the charismatic leader.

Charismatic leaders often find it difficult to step back and let the group develop independently. At worst, charismatic leaders like Fidel Castro and Hugo Chavez dominate their countries for decades, suffocating development. According to Tuckman, a good leader has to know when to step back and allow members to assert their independence, a process he called the storming phase of development.

Then they can establish procedures to govern their work, which Tuckman called the norming phase. Writing a constitution is a norming process, and it proceeded well under Sarney's presidency. By the end of his term, Brazil should have been ready for the performing stage, getting down to work on solving its problems.

But when it came time to elect Sarney's successor, in 1989, the leading candidates were both charismatic leaders, not the rational-legal ones leadership theory says the country needed. The most noteworthy was Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva, a labor leader and Workers Party founder whose dramatic personal history made him a national icon.

Raised by a single mother in abject poverty, he had become a lathe mechanic and activist union leader. He was a charming man of the people, a striking contrast to the elite lawyers and military officers who usually ran Brazil. His Workers Party was a democratic and innovative organization that claimed to offer creative new approaches to Brazil's problems.

Lula's leading opponent, Fernando Collor de Mello, was a telegenic northeastern governor supported by large contributions from businesses that feared a Lula victory. Collor was also a charismatic figure; charisma is a matter of personality, not ideology. Charismatic leaders are wild cards; it is hard to know what they will actually do once in power.

Collor was young and not well known outside his home state of Alagoas. His main claim to fame was a dramatic campaign against what he called "Maharajas" of corruption. But he was a skillful television personality, and was the first Brazilian presidential candidate to rely heavily on professional political consultants. He launched a massive and effective television advertising campaign and defeated Lula with 53% of the vote in the second round of the elections.

As president, Collor de Mello, like Sarney, gathered a team of top economists to devise an anti-inflation plan. He resolved to be more forceful than Sarney, whose plan had failed. Collor's plan froze all the bank accounts in the country, allowing only small withdrawals. In effect, everyone was forced to loan most of their money to the government, with no guarantee that it would be paid back in currency with any real value. The people were so frustrated and afraid of hyperinflation that they were willing to try almost anything. They gave Collor's plan the benefit of the doubt.

The plan worked for a short time, then inflation came back with a vengeance. People were frustrated with the failure of the Collor plan, and began to doubt their wisdom in electing him. Then, to add insult to injury, the crusader against corruption was implicated in a bizarre corruption scandal involving his brother and a close advisor. Congress went into the storming mode, and impeached Collor for corruption. He was replaced by his lackluster vice president, Itamar Franco.

In Itamar Franco, Brazilians had a traditional leader, a man without much charisma or great rational-legal skills. He knew nothing of economics; the only solution he could think of to the inflation problem was to double the workers' wages. He reluctantly backed down from this idea when his economists insisted that doing so would only feed the inflationary cycle.

Inflation was so high it seemed possible that the currency would lose all its value and the economy would collapse altogether. After several of Itamar's finance ministers gave up in frustration, he appointed sociologist Fernando Henrique Cardoso to the finance ministry.

Cardoso was a distinguished intellectual and former Senator who had played a key role in the constitutional convention. At the time he was serving as Foreign Minister, a job for which he was well qualified. He reluctantly took the Finance Ministry, a position that was viewed as a kiss of death for a politician. President Itamar Franco pleaded that the country needed him there.

No one really expected Cardoso to solve the inflation problem. They just hoped that he could tamp it down a bit and get things under control. But to everyone's surprise, Cardoso came up with an anti-inflation plan that worked. Itamar Franco's contribution was to give him the political leeway he needed to implement it. This surprising accomplishment made Cardoso a national hero, allowing him to defeat Lula in the next election despite his lack of charismatic appeal.

In Fernando Henrique Cardoso, Brazilians had a rational-legal leader, one with great intellectual accomplishments. He was the first PhD sociologist to ever run a country. But his success did not come about because of any new theories or ideas. His sociological publications on dependency and other issues didn't deal with plans to cure hyperinflation.

Rather than look for radical new approaches, Cardoso turned to many of the same economists who had advised Sarney and Collor. Cardoso wasn't an economist, but he knew enough economics to understand what they recommended. More important, he understood what would be needed to make the plan work. And the congressional leaders were desperate enough to let him do it.

Leadership theorist James MacGregor Burns distinguished between transactional and transforming leadership. Transactional leaders focus on the practicalities of administration. They make the compromises and bargains needed to keep the system going.

Transformational leaders advance new ideas and new slogans. They may be personally charismatic, they may rely on the charisma of their party or social movement, or they excite the society with new ideas. The key thing is that they inspire their followers to bring about changes in the system.

This typology doesn't fit Brazil since 1985: the greatest transformations came from transactional leadership. Cardoso transformed the system more than any of the other presidents, but he did so by using great strengths as a transactional leader, negotiating bargains and compromises with the Congress. He had no charisma, and did remarkably little to advance new ideas or visions during his campaigns or his presidency.

In his political memoirs, Cardoso wrote about what he called the art of politics, which is transactional leadership aimed at accomplishing transformational goals. As President, he spent most of his time making the system work and solving crises, many of which were triggered by international events.

Woodrow Wilson, an American president who was a distinguished scholar before taking office, developed the distinction between politics and administration. Much of Cardoso's effort was spent on administrative reform, improving the capacity of the Brazilian government to collect and allocate revenues, fight corruption, protect the environment, and so on.

Cardoso's opponent, in 1994 and in 1998, was the same Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva who had been defeated by Collor de Mello. Lula continued to be a charismatic personality, promising transformational changes. He criticized Cardoso as a "neoliberal" and promised to transform the country away from hegemonic corporate capitalism. This appealed to the third of the electorate that votes on the left, but not to the moderate voters who decide the elections.

Lula and his party were devastated by their losses to Cardoso in 1994 and 1998. They thought their time had come when Collor was impeached, and that they were cheated out of it by a financial trick that would fail just as previous plans had done. They were amazed when Cardoso's anti-inflation plan worked, and the country held together.

If Lula had been elected in 1994 or even in 1998 it is possible that Brazil would have had a radical change of course to the nationalist left. In 1994, the Workers' Party had no anti-inflation plan and saw no need for one. They strongly opposed privatization of state-owned industries, a policy that had begun under Collor and continued under Cardoso.

If they had been true to their promises, they would have greatly accelerated land reform, increased support for cooperatives and small businesses, and increased income transfer to the poor. In 1998 the country was suffering from a global economic crisis, and Lula was convinced that Cardoso had failed. If Lula had been elected, he would probably have moved to protect Brazilian industry from global competition and stopped the privatization process.

But by the end of Cardoso's second term, Lula and his top advisors had lost enthusiasm for this transformational project. They were impressed with the progress the country made under Cardoso, especially with the benefits the poor and working class obtained from the end of inflation. The collapse of the Soviet Union and the progress China and India were making persuaded them that liberal capitalism was the wave of the future.

And they were very tired of losing elections because the middle class electorate found them too radical. So, for the 2002 election Lula hired a political consultant and moderated his image. He promised "change" but never said what the change would be. When he took office, he made only small changes to Cardoso's financial model, most of which made it more "neo-liberal".

Lula's more ideological supporters were outraged. Heloísa Helena, a fiery Workers' Party senator from the state of Alagoas, protested that:

"Everything that we condemned with vehemence during our long party militancy, they have put into practice as if they were students of the International Monetary Fund and the World Bank. They have not just continued the economic policies of the Fernando Henrique Cardoso government; they have deepened the commitment to the neoliberal project."

For Marxist scholar Francisco de Oliveira, it was as if Caesar had decided not to cross the Rubicon or Lenin had called off the October revolution:

Contrary to Lenin, who perceived the breakdown of the dominant political order and pushed it further along the same path, leading the movement to socialist revolution, Lula restored the political order that the cyclone generated by Cardoso's deregulation and capitalist globalization had blown to pieces.

To the absence of hegemony the Workers' Party's only response is to retreat back across the Rubicon, surrendering to the Rome of the dollar, situated somewhere between Avenida Paulista [São Paulo's financial center] and Wall Street.

But Lula took office in 2003, not 1917. The dominant order had not broken down and Cardoso's policies had not caused a "cyclone." Lula commanded no Roman legions. He took power through a democratic election, not a revolution. He was able to win the election because he explicitly promised not to upset the capitalist apple cart. Brazil is better off because of his decision, just as the Russia would have been if Lenin had called off the Bolshevik revolution.

Lula knew that Brazilians were tired of being told their institutions needed to be reformed, tired of losing the security of government jobs and early retirements, tired of being hectored by environmentalists and other activists. They wanted a president who was a cheerleader, not a critic. One who would let them return to a more relaxed, traditionally Brazilian way of life.

But they also liked being paid in money that held its value and they wanted to enjoy spending it. It was Lula's good fortune to be elected at a point in time when the Brazilian economy could sustain economic growth with some redistribution of income and without reigniting inflation. He seized the opportunity.

Heloísa Helena was expelled from the Workers Party and ran as the candidate of a leftist opposition party in 2006. In the first round of the 2006 elections, Lula got 41.6%, Helena got 6.85%.

So what can we conclude about the contributions of Brazil's democratic presidents? José Sarney may be under appreciated. He had a tough job taking over after Tancredo Neves' death and he played the role the country needed by standing back and letting the constitutional convention do its work.

Collor de Mello started the privatization process and opened the country up to the world economy, policies that were attacked by the left at the time but that were later accepted by Lula. Collor was impeached, which is a kind of indictment, but never convicted.

On his Web site, Collor claims that he was "accused of corruption by his political opponents and by those who felt threatened by the modernization of the Brazilian economy," and that he was found innocent of all charges, making him "the only politician in Brazil to have an officially clear record validated by an investigation of all interests and sectors of the opposition."

Itamar Franco, like Sarney, moved up from the vice presidency under difficult circumstances. He was honest and helped the country get back on track. He feels that he didn't get enough credit for the anti-inflation plan, which was Cardoso's work but done on his watch.

He supported Lula for the presidency in 2002, but later felt unappreciated, saying of Lula: "I was the first to support him. Later, he disappointed me because he became arrogant. That humble man, who assumed the presidency of the republic, no longer exists." He complained that Lula was always saying "never before in the history of this country" as if nobody else in the history of the country had ever done anything.

Fernando Henrique Cardoso guaranteed his place in history with one singular contribution: ending hyperinflation and establishing fiscal and monetary stability. Much of his presidency was spent dealing with the myriad problems of converting to a low-inflation economy in a context of several severe global economic shocks.

But he did a lot of other things as well: administrative reform, social security reform, restructuring the banking sector, setting up the school allowances program that Lula later expanded into family allowances. Many of his efforts were attacked relentlessly by the Workers' Party during his administration, only to be continued or expanded by them when Lula took office.

When asked about Lula, Fernando Henrique Cardoso said, "I think he will be remembered for growth and continuity, and for putting more emphasis on social spending. He's a Lech Walesa who worked out." Comparing his own presidency to Lula's he said, "I did the reforms. Lula surfs the wave."

Like the cheerleader that he is, Lula exalts his own presidency, arguing that it "can only be compared with the government of President Getúlio Vargas." He insists that "if we had continued the Cardoso policies, Brazil would have been bankrupt. Brazil worked out only because we changed his policies. The only thing we kept was fiscal responsibility. One thing – that's all. What happened after conquering inflation? We were very active in international policies. Brazil for many years had no policy for investment. No ability to generate jobs. No policies to redistribute wealth."

These statements are not really accurate. Brazil had policies for all these things under Cardoso, as it did under the other presidents. They might have worked better if the Workers Party hadn't relentlessly opposed them. Then when Lula took office he continued most of Cardoso's policies, with modest changes, pretending that he was doing something dramatically new.

Lula has no one dramatic contribution comparable to Cardoso's ending of hyperinflation to assure his place in history. His Zero Hunger program was supposed to be that, but it was an administrative mess and was converted to an income transfer program using administrative machinery Cardoso had set up.

His successful policies were more transactional than transformational. What Lula did do was channel a lot more money into income redistribution, and that certainly made a difference. But that was only possible because the economy was stabilized and able to grow, and because of the administrative machinery set up under Cardoso.

When commenting on the legacy of his presidency, Lula stated quite realistically that "the legacy of our government is the consolidation of social policies with economic growth in a solid macroeconomic situation." This modest, transactional accomplishment was exactly what Brazil needed after the reforms of the Cardoso era. Lula's only error is to take all credit for himself, blaming Cardoso for all the country's remaining problems.

Both Cardoso and Lula faced political limitations that kept them from completing needed labor and tax reforms. If their parties had been able to work together, rather than allying with traditional parties to fight each other, they might have done more. This continual squabbling between two parties that actually share a common political perspective is an example of what Freud called the narcissism of small differences.

Perhaps the most important legacy of the Lula presidency was to definitively establish a market-friendly economic model with fiscal stability and openness to global markets. Before Lula became president, investors could not be certain that the country would not abandon this development strategy for a nationalist, anti-corporate model along the lines advocated by the World Social Forum. Once this issue was in the past, the path was clear for capitalist economic growth.

Dilma Rousseff, Brazil's new president, owes her position entirely to Lula. Yet she recognizes that his model was one of continuity, not change, in fundamental economics. When an American interviewer asked if she would continue the economic path set out by President Lula, she responded quite frankly:

There's no question about that. Why? Because for us this was the major achievement of our country. It is not an achievement of one sole administration - it is an achievement of the Brazilian state, of the people of our country. The fact that we managed to control inflation, have a flexible exchange-rate regime and fiscal consolidation so that today we are amongst the countries in the world that has the lowest debt-to-GDP ratio.

Also, we have a not very significant deficit. I don't want to brag, but we have a 2.2 percent deficit. We intend in the next four years to reduce the debt-to-GDP ratio and to guarantee this inflationary stability.

What Dilma couldn't bring herself to say is that credit for what she called "the major achievement of our country" goes primarily to Fernando Henrique Cardoso. She was right that this achievement was not Cardoso's alone. The Congress deserves credit for putting the national interest above partisan advantage in implementing the plan. Lula deserves credit for continuing it.

This continuity in policy makes a surprising contrast with the United States where the Republican opposition has adamantly put ideology and partisan advantage ahead of solving the country's problems. Although the United States is supposedly the country that values pragmatism, it is the Brazilians who have proved more pragmatic while the Americans are paralyzed by ideological fervor.

Ted Goertzel, Ph.D., is Professor of Sociology at Rutgers University in Camden, New Jersey. He has published biographies of Fernando Henrique Cardoso and Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva. References for the quotes in this article can be found in the latter book. He is working on comparative biography of Brazilian presidents. He can be reached at goertzel@camden.rutgers.edu.



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Comments (96)Add Comment
...
written by João da Silva, April 20, 2012

Twenty-five Years of Presidential Leadership in Brazil


Not a bad narration of the history of Brasil, by Ted.

But...but...but...he forgot to include Ulysses Guimarães who played an important role in writing the Constitution of Brasil in 1988.

I don't think Ted nor our distinguished fellow writer and commentator Ricky Amaral remember Dr.Ulysses who didn't tuck his tail behind his hind legs run away from Brasil during the military government.smilies/wink.gif

Thank God, we Brasilians have short memories and thus no heroes!smilies/sad.gif
...
written by wisemann, April 21, 2012
Collor (brainwashed by the washington consensus) was a disaster for the Brasilian economy. Opening up the market from night to day when Brasilian Industry was burdened by high inflation, high taxes, high interest rates, high everything......destroyed many companies & created huge unemployment among a highly qualified (engineers, technicians, etc.) segment of the Labor force.

On another note, I am watching this nationalization of YPF in Argentina with great interest. It is considered very controversial and terrible by the global speculator class.

However, it could be a model for Telebras to nationalize Telefonica and GVT (taking a 51% ownership similar to the PB model), thus reintegrating a strategic sector (Telecom) back into the public space, where it belongs....IMHO! There will still be private sector players - TIM, Oi, America Movel, etc., thus allowing for more 'balance' in a sector that is crucial to Brasil's future economic development.
...
written by João da Silva, April 21, 2012


However, it could be a model for Telebras to nationalize Telefonica and GVT (taking a 51% ownership similar to the PB model), thus reintegrating a strategic sector (Telecom) back into the public space, where it belongs....IMHO! There will still be private sector players - TIM, Oi, America Movel, etc., thus allowing for more 'balance' in a sector that is crucial to Brasil's future economic development.


Brilliant comments, Herr.Wisemann.smilies/smiley.gif In 1996/1998, there was a big debate among the "society" about the "privatization" of state owned banks, Telecoms, Vale, etc; Your proposed model was recommended by this "silent minority". However, the President at that time (along with his loyal party members/ ministers) wanted it otherwise.smilies/sad.gif

It is quite amazing that Dr.Goertzel has not included the story of "Privatização" in this article. smilies/wink.gif

BTW, I´d like to modify your proposed model of Telebras (does it still exist?smilies/smiley.gifsmilies/wink.gif) taking over Telefonica & GVT which probably would love to sell back their "assets" for a huge profit and go back to their respective countries in their "Dear old Europe".smilies/smiley.gifsmilies/wink.gifsmilies/cheesy.gif
...
written by wisemann, April 22, 2012
Yes Joao, Telebras was resusitated about 2 years back as part of the govt.'s plan to use it as a platform to bring broadband service to all the remote underserved regions of the country...the areas the 'private' companies did not want to 'serve' because they considered them 'unprofitbale'.

Regarding sell back of assets, the govt. should make them a 'take it or else' offer, setting the price discounted by the huge net profits these companies have squeezed out of Brasil these past 15 years.

Yes, Dr. G. did conveniently 'window' dress those privatizations of huge state assets for Centavos on the Real, as having been something 'good' for Brasil.

Reply to Joao da Silva
written by Ricardo C. Amaral, April 22, 2012

Ricardo: Yes, Joao - I remember Ulysses Guimarães and Franco Montoro.

President Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva got lucky when he lost 3 presidential elections in Brazil, the first he lost to Fernando Collor de Mello, and twice he lost to Fernando Henrique Cardoso, and finally he was elected president of Brazil in 2002.

Thanks to the outstanding economic performance that we had in China in the last 10 years - one of the positive impact that such growth had in other areas of the world - the China effect helped to lift the boats of over 30 million people in Brazil out of poverty in the last 10 years.

In my opinion, it was not democracy that was at the core and helped to lift the boats of so many people in Brazil to the middle class - it was thanks to the outstanding economic performance of China that had a major impact in the growth also of the Brazilian economy.

We Brazilians should thank the Chinese government for doing such a great job in lifting the boats of over 300 million people in China (an economic performance that I find to be mind-boggling in every way.)

China has delivered the greatest economic performance of any country in history in lifting the boats of over 300 million people in China to the middle class in such a short time period.

And they were able to deliver such an outstanding economic performance under their xxxxx system, and not under a democratic system.

Brazil is in great shape economically today, including in part the economic transformation of the Brazilian economy under the generals leadership, and also with the compliments of the Chinese.


.
The dictatorship years placed Brazil in the right path for economic prosperity in Brazil.
written by Ricardo C. Amaral, April 22, 2012

Ricardo: Let me clarify what I mean by the generals leadership.

The dictatorship years placed Brazil in the right path for economic prosperity in Brazil.

Originally this was just one article that was split into 2 parts as follows:

Brazzil Magazine – April 13, 2010
The Brazilian Formula for Success: Dictatorship – Part 1 of 2
Written by Ricardo C. Amaral

http://www.brazzil.com/compone...l#comments


The Brazilian Formula for Success: Dictatorship – Part 2 of 2
http://www.brazzil.com/compone...l#comments

.
It is just part of a global economic and financial war that has been going on for many years.
written by Ricardo C. Amaral, April 22, 2012

Ricardo: I posted the following yesterday at the Elite Trader Economics forum:

April 21, 2012

SouthAmerica: I agree 100 percent with President Dilma Rousseff that interest rates should be reduced in Brazil to be compatible with the global standards. And she should continue to defend the country's industrial sector.

By early 2013 the Selic rate in Brazil should reach the level around 7 percent.

If you have been reading my articles and postings for many years, then you would know that I have been suggesting a devaluation of the real vs. the US dollar to compensate for the game that the United States and China have been playing for many years. The Federal Reserve policy regarding interest rate and the currency games that the U.S. has been playing against the rest of the world – it is just part of a global economic and financial war that has been going on for many years.


*****


Brazilian president calls for interest rates closer to global standards - Xinhua | April 21, 2012
http://www.globaltimes.cn/NEWS...dards.aspx


*****


MercoPress – April 21, 2012

“Brazil will continue to intervene in support of industry and depressing its currency”

http://en.mercopress.com/2012/...mpaign=rss


.
wisemann
written by João da Silva, April 22, 2012

Yes Joao, Telebras was resusitated about 2 years back as part of the govt.'s plan to use it as a platform to bring broadband service to all the remote underserved regions of the country...the areas the 'private' companies did not want to 'serve' because they considered them 'unprofitbale'.


Herr.Wisemann, this is one of the pet topics of Rickey Amaral and my humble self. Rickey wrote years ago (was it in 2006 or 2007?) about the necessity (and the importance) of bringing broadband service to the "under-served" regions and populace. The objective is "inclusão digital" (Hope you know enough Portuguese to understand what I mean). Rickey and I have been commenting for years about a new "model" for educating the "under-served" mass in Brasil. I am glad you made some comments which really reinforce our point of view. Thanks.

BTW, what do you think of the outcome of the first round of French Presidential elections? Is Sarko going to be reelected? Regardless, I certainly wouldn't like to see their next President attempting to shove 36 RAFALE toy planes down our throat.smilies/shocked.gif

Instead, we could use that money to universalize the broadband service (at least 1 Mb and not the 256 Kb).smilies/cheesy.gif
36 toy planes?
written by DU48, April 26, 2012
You forgot to mention BR's nuclear submarine program-J daS..

On the nationalisation/privatisation issue- There is a rumour going round that President Cristina Fernandez has only nationalised YPF to soften it up for a possible Chinese take over-Argentina has real inflation of 20%.She needs the oil money anyway.
The bottom line is surely that whether you have a corporist or liberal attitude politicians are going to mess up.Menem did and now Cristina will, by brainwashing everybody with worn out peronist ideology and false nationalism.Governments and politicians make a pig's proverbial of running industry. Politicians' job is to see to it that WHOEVER runs industry and utilities keeps their hands out of the till including their own! More accountability for everybody especially those who have economic and political power.
Du 48
written by João da Silva, April 27, 2012

36 toy planes?


Yes they are.smilies/smiley.gifsmilies/wink.gifsmilies/cheesy.gif

You forgot to mention BR's nuclear submarine program-J daS..


No Du 48, Cel.Ederson and I have long memories! You forgot that this business of "Toy Planes" and Nuclear Subs was all done under the leadership of our erstwhile President. The current President managed to kill the project of Toy planes, but....but....but... not the Sub project(which BTW was spearheaded by our ex-MOD who also served under FHC).

There is a rumour going round that President Cristina Fernandez has only nationalised YPF to soften it up for a possible Chinese take over-Argentina has real inflation of 20%.She needs the oil money anyway.


It may not be a rumor. She is the real Caudilha of Patagonia and now that Nestor is Rng.I.P, she has no other person to turn for help. Uncle Jintão is willing to help and she has gracefully accepted his generous offer.smilies/smiley.gifsmilies/wink.gifsmilies/cheesy.gif

Politicians' job is to see to it that WHOEVER runs industry and utilities keeps their hands out of the till including their own!


The trouble with the politicians all over the world is that they don't share the views of you and me! But...but...but...for people like us who are outspoken,the politicians would run amok.smilies/cheesy.gifsmilies/grin.gif
...
written by wisemann, April 28, 2012
Eu falo Português razoavelmente bem e entender tudo!

I hope the c**kroach sarko does not win......

Brasil still needs a strong asymetric defense & needs to develop strong relationships with the defense sectors of Deutschland, Russia, Sweden & Persia......stay away from the yanks, zionists, limeys, frogs & their equipment, while still maintaining 'correct' relationships with them.......

I believe our Presidenta will get along splendidly with Comrade Putin.......
Global boycott of everything related to Israel
written by Ricardo C. Amaral, April 28, 2012

Ricardo: Here is what I posted yesterday on the Elite Trader economics forum:

The United States is planning to attack Iran...
http://www.elitetrader.com/vb/...ost3512563

...April 27, 2012

SouthAmerica: Today I was watching Squawk Box on CNBC and they had an oil analyst talking about the oil market, and one thing that he mentioned based on his analysis is that there's plenty of oil available in the market today, and the “Israel threat of attacking Iran” is causing about a US$ 40 premium in the price of oil in world markets.

Today, without this “Israeli threat against Iran” the price of oil in world markets it would be trading around US$ 70 per barrel.

The Israeli paranoia regarding Iran's nuclear program is based on pure paranoia and nothing else, but the “Israel threat of attacking Iran” is real and has been causing a massive damage to the world economy in the trillions of US dollars.

The Israeli paranoia about Iran's nuclear program also caused the European Union to place new sanctions against importing oil from Iran resulting in an economic catastrophe to the economies of many countries in Europe – they already had an imploding economic system in these countries and now they are making a bad situation even worse.

It seems to me that the “Brain Dead” are making all these decisions without any regard to even a minimum of common sense.

Israel and Israeli paranoia is causing massive real damage to the economy of countries around the world, and it's time for the world to fight back against these mentally sick people, and countries around the world should boycott everything related to Israel.

The world should isolate Israel in every way possible by cutting off any trade, any artistic, any diplomatic connection to Israel.

Israel has a government that is “Paranoid Schizophrenic” and their mental disease is causing a lot of real damage to the world economy, since the US$ 40 Israel premium included in the price of oil in world markets affect not only the transportation market , but also the price of food, and just about everything in the production process of goods on our planet.

The reality is: Israel has become a real cancer for the world economy in every way, and slowly this terminal cancer is spreading beyond repair.

The entire world should isolate Israel, before they destroy what is left of the imploding global financial and economic system of our planet.

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The “First Great Depression of the 21st Century” has been underway...
written by Ricardo C. Amaral, April 29, 2012

“First Great Depression of the 21st Century”
http://www.elitetrader.com/vb/...adid=49920

...April 29, 2012

SouthAmerica: Because the mainstream media, and most economists are not recognizing that the new Great Depression is underway - very few people such as myself, has been saying for a few years that the “First Great Depression of the 21st Century” has been underway. This is a very important point that most people doesn't understand and they don't grasp regarding the current “Great Depression”: Only a few years in the future the mainstream media, and most economists in general will look back to this period in history that we are going through, and then they will finally start calling it the “First Great Depression of the 21st Century.”


.
Noam Chomsky: The Purpose of Education
written by Ricardo C. Amaral, April 29, 2012

Noam Chomsky: The Purpose of Education
http://youtu.be/NQS2kkPNTo0


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Bold comments, Ricky!
written by Ederson, April 29, 2012
Israel is a cancer that is destroying the world's economic and financial systems? smilies/wink.gif
...
written by João da Silva, April 29, 2012

Israel is a cancer that is destroying the world's economic and financial systems


Me thinks Israel along with Sunnis,Shiites & your favorite buddies Surfis! are turning the entire world into an Inferno, Col.smilies/wink.gifsmilies/cheesy.gifsmilies/grin.gif

Cheers

P.S: it is time for some decent Falafel and Sri Lanka tea & I am sure ASP would like to join us.
Reply to Ederson
written by Ricardo C. Amaral, April 30, 2012

Ricardo: As you know I am Agnostic and it does not make any difference to me which religion anyone follows. I am not against any religious group.

When I talk about Israel and the Israelis I am talking about the crazy Zionists and their paranoia about Iran.

You asked me: "Israel is a cancer that is destroying the world's economic and financial systems?"

The answer is yes.

There is a US$ 40 dollar premium added to the price of oil as a direct result of the constant threat that "Israel is ready to attack Iran at any time" to destroy the Iranian nuclear program.

This US$ 40 dollar Israel premium on the price of oil in world markets it is devastating to the economic system of countries around the world.

Add on top of that the sanctions against importing oil from Iran as a direct result of Israel paranoia - this sanctions is making things a lot worse for the collapsing economies of many European countries.

As you can see Israel has become a real cancer and a major source of economic destruction around the world.

.
Ricardo!
written by Ederson, April 30, 2012
Ricky, I think most people will agree with you. What is it with the Israelis and their determination to live in Israel? How many times has Jerusalem been sacked? It must have been at least forty times in the last 4,000 years, and these people are willing to die to return and hold onto their homeland? You can torture them, enslave them, slaughter them, and they still want to live on that worthless, rock-strewn piece of scrabble! Maybe they should have accepted Uganda when the Brits offered it to them.

Do you have substantiation concerning the 40 dollar premium the world pays because of the Jews, or is it an educated guess?

I still stand by my argument that while Israel appears to be the flash-point, the bonfire involves the Saudis. Is anyone paying any attention to the Saudi's investment in nuclear power and technology or the close working relationship they have historically enjoyed with Pakistan? Do economists dwell on such things? I'm not going to write another essay on why everyone is simply wrong concerning the Middle-east. It does little good. However, I will put my money on those cancerous Jews and state my belief that even if Jerusalem is sacked another forty times, the Jews will still be there, or fighting to regain it. Always enjoy your opinions, Ricky!

smilies/wink.gif
For example
written by Ederson, April 30, 2012
To illustrate how complex the Iranian/Saudi conflict is, does anyone remember the Bamiyan Province massacre? Of course not, because everyone is too preoccupied with Israel. However, for those who care, it involves the massacre of 5,000 Shia by the Muhajideen who, in turn, were sponsored by the Pakistanis who, in turn, were being sponsored by the Saudis, in essence the Sunni leadership.
I am constantly amazed by those who fail to understand the significance of the Shia/Sunni conflict, or who even care. The Iranians are the protectors of the Shia, and the Saudis slapped the hell out of them by this indirect gesture. And of course, no one remembers the Iranian near-invasion of Afghanistan either, I'm sure.
This was not the only provocation by the Saudis, but who cares.
What is really odd about this whole misadventure was the fact that at one time, in the sixties, Iran was almost a sworn protector of Pakistan and sided with Pakistan against India in a big way.

I could go on and on, but the preoccupation everyone has with Israel only serves to dilute and mask the truth behind the unrest and calamity that awaits the world in the Mideast.
Ederson
written by João da Silva, April 30, 2012

I still stand by my argument that while Israel appears to be the flash-point, the bonfire involves the Saudis.


Me too thinks the Bonfire starts in Riyadh and not in Tehran nor Tel Aviv. Not because you say so, but due to my own research. The Southern Brasilian peasants are not all that dumb, in case you didn't know.smilies/wink.gif

Is anyone paying any attention to the Saudi's investment in nuclear power and technology or the close working relationship they have historically enjoyed with Pakistan?


I am paying attention. But one thing I am unable to grasp is the reason for the cozy relationship between Saudis and Pakistanis while the former are Arabs and the latter are not.smilies/shocked.gif

The same applies in the case of Saudis and Iranians. Iranians do not consider themselves as Arabs, but Persians. Afghans are not Arabs either.smilies/sad.gif

I must confess it is too hard for me to comprehend.smilies/sad.gif
Peasant intelligence
written by Ederson, April 30, 2012
Joao, I have always believed that the further south you go in Brasil, the smarter the peasantry gets, and by the time you get to the Pampas, you are dealing with pure genius. smilies/wink.gif It's an old family joke.
FIFA World Cup Final 1958 Brazil VS Sweden
written by Ricardo C. Amaral, May 01, 2012

Ricardo: I just found this video - it's worth watching it.

FIFA World Cup Final 1958 Brazil VS Sweden
http://youtu.be/OJy71JZWtUk

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Reply to Ederson - Part 1 of 2
written by Ricardo C. Amaral, May 01, 2012

Ricardo: Welcome back to the discussions at Brazzil magazine.

First, I want to remind you that I am Agnostic and it does not matter to me which religion anybody follows.

And if you noticed on my posting I am talking about Israel, and Israelis and not about Jews.

When you mentioned on your posting 4,000 years, and the word Jews, then you brought religion to the conversation.

I mentioned the Zionists on my posting – Zionism has nothing to do with religion, it has to do with political agenda like Republicans, Democrats, or right wing neocons, etc....

The Zionists is a group of “Paranoid Schizophrenic” and mentally sick people, but they don't represent Israel, or the Israeli people, they are just a bunch of crazy people and they are scattered around the world.

I have seen in the last year a number of oil analysts bringing up the subject that there's a “Israel threat of attacking Iran” premium included in the price of oil in world markets – and most of these analysts mentioned a US$ 30 per barrel “Israel threat of attacking Iran premium on the price of oil.”

Here are two people talking about this subject – the first one an oil analyst and he estimates a US$ 40 premium, and the other fellow is just a political commentator and he is more conservative and he uses a US$ 20 premium.

To be on the conservative side, the figure that I heard more often than any estimate is the US$ 30 premium per barrel of oil.

That kind of extra cost included in the barrel of oil in world markets is devastating to the global economy and it has a very negative effect on the economy of every country around the world – other than the oil producing countries such as Saudi Arabia, Iran, and so on....

Saudi Arabia got their share of nuclear weapons from Pakistan many years ago – Both countries are controlled by the Sunnis. Saudi Arabia has a lot of cash, and Pakistan has the nukes, and Pakistan needs a benefactor such as Saudi Arabia.

Saudi Arabia has a self-interest in keeping these geopolitical tensions going on, because it's good for business and they make a ton of extra money.

CNBC Squawk Box – about price of oil – April 27, 2012
http://video.cnbc.com/gallery/...831&play=1

Geopolitical risk related to Israel = US$ 40 per barrel


Iranian war threat is pushing oil prices up – March 22, 2012
http://youtu.be/axwifh-VxJY

Anyway, the Israeli people are aware of the damage that the crazy Zionists are creating to the rest of the world with their paranoia regarding Iran's nuclear programme – and the population in Israel is turning against these crazy Zionists in Israel.

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Reply to Ederson - Part 2 of 2
written by Ricardo C. Amaral, May 01, 2012

Front page headline on FT: Disunity on Iran

Unity in Israel over the need to face down the threat posed by Iran's nuclear programme is crumbling. Benjamin Netanyahu's government has faced a barrage of criticism for its stance on Iran, in particular for the implied threat of air strikes. Former director of the Shin Bet internal security service Yuval Diskin has been joined by former premier Ehud Olmert in expressing dismay.

The story continues on page 7 as follows:


Financial Times (UK) – May 1, 2012
Netanyahu sees unity on Iran crumble
By Tobias Buck in Jerusalem


Israeli leaders have spent years calling for international unity to face down the threat posed by Iran’s nuclear programme. Now they are seeing this common front crumble in the one place they thought was safe: Israel itself.

Over the past week, Benjamin Netanyahu’s government has faced an unprecedented barrage of criticism at home for its stance on Iran, in particular for the implied threat of air strikes. Leading the latest charge was Yuval Diskin, the former director of the Shin Bet internal security service, whose incendiary remarks have dominated the Israeli political debate for days.

Mr Diskin, who left his post amid much praise last year, publicly slammed Mr Netanyahu and Ehud Barak, the defence minister, as “messianic” politicians who could not be trusted, especially on Iran.

The two men, he said, were “not the people I would like to be holding the steering wheel” during a crisis.

Mr Diskin also warned that an Israeli strike against Iran, contrary to government assurances, was likely to hasten the development of an Iranian nuclear bomb.

His remarks were quickly dismissed by government officials as the words of a disgruntled ex-officer angered by his failure to secure another top job. Yet others rushed to his defence, including Meir Dagan, the former head of the Mossad intelligence service, and Ehud Olmert, the former prime minister.

Speaking in New York on Sunday, Mr Olmert raised a question debated with growing intensity in Israel and abroad: “What has happened,” he asked, “that all the leaders of Israel’s security services suddenly think in the same way?”

There is strong evidence that the Israeli defence and intelligence establishment is opposed to a strike on Iran, at least for the time being. Mr Dagan, for one, made his position clear last year, when he famously described an Israeli attack on Iran as the “stupidest idea” he had ever encountered.

His assessment has since been echoed by other retired intelligence officials and generals, giving rise to speculation that Mr Dagan, Mr Diskin and others are merely saying in public what their successors say in private.

Another blow to the government came last week, when Lieutenant General Benny Gantz, current head of Israel’s armed forces, voiced a string of opinions that differed from official government rhetoric. He said, among other things, that he did not believe that Iran would build a nuclear weapon and described the leadership in Tehran as “very rational”.

The splits are plain to see, says Yossi Alpher, a political analyst and a former adviser to Mr Barak. “We can conclude from all these statements that there is a lot of mistrust and suspicion at the top, and that certainly a major part of the Israeli security establishment is more cautious on Iran than the political leadership.”

He added: “The purpose of these statements is to make it more difficult to decide on an attack. If Barak and Netanyahu order strikes now, they will seem to be acting out of the irresponsible calculus that is being attributed to them. And if things go wrong, there will be plenty of people who can say: we told you so.”

For Mr Netanyahu, the public display of dissent from Israel’s military and intelligence officials comes at a particularly critical moment.

Speculation is mounting that the prime minister will call an early election, possibly in August or September. The issue of Iran is likely to feature strongly in any election campaign, and has until now been widely seen as one of his strong cards.

Meanwhile, Iranian negotiators are locked in talks over the country’s nuclear programme with the EU and six other powers. Analysts agree the talks have gained urgency because of fears Israel will bomb Iran’s nuclear facilities unless a diplomatic solution is swiftly found.

Israeli leaders now fear the escalating internal strife will convince Tehran a strike is less likely than before and reduce its incentive to compromise. That concern was echoed by Ari Shavit, an influential columnist in the Haaretz daily on Monday.

“Diskin tried to empty the ammunition from the Israeli gun threatening Iran with a military strike,” he said. “But it was that loaded gun that made the international community impose a diplomatic and economic siege on Iran.”


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Ederson
written by João da Silva, May 01, 2012

Joao, I have always believed that the further south you go in Brasil, the smarter the peasantry gets, and by the time you get to the Pampas, you are dealing with pure genius.


I am not from the Pampas, Eddie. I am a "serrano", where the air is rare, you have breathing problem, etc; However, it does give us an opportunity to reflect on who pursue their tedious lives in the Pampas. The Pampas can be as boring as the desert of Saudi Arabia (or Sahara.

Cheers
Ricardo
written by Ederson, May 01, 2012
We rarely disagree, Ricky.smilies/wink.gif But can we keep in mind that Israel's sabre-rattling does serve a purpose, however confusing at the moment. In addition, Israel has already suffered through one Yom Kippur; it probably would like to avoid another, no matter how embarrassing or expensive.
Joao
written by Ederson, May 01, 2012
Joao, I know you don't live in the Pampas.smilies/wink.gif But at least one of the world's most beautiful women has family there. And, yes, you can call me tedious.smilies/wink.gif
Frontline 4-Part series about Wall Street and the collapsing US financial system
written by Ricardo C. Amaral, May 02, 2012

Ricardo: Great program produced by Frontline - I suggest people watch at least Part One and Part Four. Each episode is about one hour.

Central Banks and the US Dollar
http://www.elitetrader.com/vb/...ost3515690

May 2, 2012

SouthAmerica: On the episode One of this series Frontline includes a very well done documentary explaining the “Derivatives” market, and the creation of a new lethal product called the “Credit Default Swaps”.

This documentary about “Derivatives” and “Credit Default Swaps” is very important for people to grasp what is behind the latest estimate figure of US$ 730 trillion dollars “derivatives nuclear weapon” market that can explode at any time resulting in a catastrophic meltdown of the global economy.

Frontline 4-Part series about Wall Street and the collapsing US financial system - one hour each episode:

Frontline: Money, Power, & Wall Street – May 1, 2012
http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/pages/.../?autoplay

Part 1 – Frontline explain the development of “Credit Default Swaps” a type of derivative.

Part 2 – Henry Paulson and the Wall Street bailout

Part 3 – Ben Bernanke and the Federal Reserve and the collapsing global banking system.

Ben Bernanke and the Federal Reserve supply US$ 7.7 trillion dollars to keep the game going for a while longer until the entire House of Cards meltdown.

Part 4 – Wall Street has specialized in scamming people around the world – that is how the system works, and it is how Wall Street has been making money for many years.

Wall Street doesn't screw only communities around Europe, they also screw communities around the United States, and as these predators leave wreckage and wastelands behind them, they have moved in for the kill on their next victim, it will be an easy prey: Brazil

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Derivatives: “financial weapons of mass destruction”
written by Ricardo C. Amaral, May 02, 2012

The derivatives market is an unregulated market that is in automatic pilot, and since the financial meltdown in September/October 2008 when the entire global financial system was collapsing – at that time the total outstanding notional amount of all derivatives rose from $673 trillion at June 30, 2008 to $708 trillion at June 30, 2011 – and to the latest estimated figure of US$ 730 trillion dollars as of December 31, 2011.

In a 1994 cover story by Carol J. Loomis on Fortune magazine, Fortune called derivatives, then relatively new on the scene, "The Risk That Won't Go Away."

Years later derivatives grabbed everyone’s attention when Warren Buffett called it “financial weapons of mass destruction”

The derivatives market was at the core of the events regarding the global financial meltdown of the September/October 2008.

The derivatives threat is back in a big way, and that market is ripe to explode into a catastrophic chain reaction that can result in a massive meltdown of the entire global financial system.

I have no idea who is in the other side of these derivatives with a notional amount outstanding of US$ 708 trillion US dollars as reported by the Bank for International Settlements.

BIS Quarterly Review – December 2011 – Page A 131
Table 19: Amounts outstanding of over-the-counter (OTC) derivatives
Notional amounts outstanding as of June 2011 = US$ 708 trillion

...According to the Bank for International Settlements, the total outstanding notional amount is US$708 trillion (as of June 2011). Of this total notional amount, 67% are interest rate contracts, 8% are credit default swaps (CDS), 9% are foreign exchange contracts, 2% are commodity contracts, 1% are equity contracts, and 12% are other. Because OTC derivatives are not traded on an exchange, there is no central counter-party. Therefore, they are subject to counter-party risk, like an ordinary contract, since each counter-party relies on the other to perform.


*****


http://www.elitetrader.com/vb/...ost3402261

In a Nutshell:

The global banking system is at the edge of the abyss, and we would have a massive global financial meltdown, if they were not trying to play games with the figures, and trying very hard to hide their massive losses the best way they can.

What this US$ 730 trillion dollars figure is telling me is that most of the derivatives is nothing more than a humongous “Ponzi Scheme” that can blow up at any time and start a massive chain reaction that can destroy the entire global financial system – it will be remembered as: the mother of all financial meltdowns.

During the great depression of the 1930's we had the stock market collapse of 1929, then in the following 3 years the stock market bounced back, then in 1932 started the real nasty decline that sunk the stock market and the US economy into the bottom of the abyss.

Today, we have reached that special 1932 turning point: the point where the stock market and the US economy it will sink like the Titanic.

What I am saying is: it does not matter who will be the next president of the United States, because we are entering the catastrophic phase of the new great depression similar to the period from 1932 to 1940.

We are going to have real rough years ahead of us. It's not going to be a pretty sight.

You can bet on that!!!!!!!

By the way, this new great depression that is underway, it will be a lot worse than the great depression of the 1930's.

You might be wondering why the US mainstream media has not been using the term “Great Depression” to described what has been going on in the economy of many countries all over Europe, and in the United States?

Only few years in the future they will look back to this period that we are going through, and then they will start calling this period the “First Great Depression of the 21st Century.”

My guess is that in 2012 we will have another massive global financial meltdown worse than the one we had in 2008.

We never had before so much government interference and manipulation on the financial markets the way that we have today, and it is hard to predict what would create the spark that would blow up the entire global financial system – but that could happen at any time.

.
Very good interview with Gerald Celente about collapsing America...
written by Ricardo C. Amaral, May 03, 2012

Gerald Celente - This Week in Money - 30 Apr 2012
http://youtu.be/_VyA_10tV34


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There is still hope left
written by Andre, May 03, 2012
The problem is that this is an election year and much will go undone because congress is unwilling to play ball on anything. A lot of these issues I directly blame on the people electing the nay party (tea party or colloquially known as teabaggers). Honestly some of the views share by Leon Panetta in Brazil is a step in the right direction for the United States to stay ahead but more needs to be done. I believe that the United States can bounce back if only it 1. Legalize all undocumented (pay fines/back taxes owed) because it will mean more revenue coming in and as a side effect those who do not wish to stay to pay anything owed or the fines will leave accordingly. 2. Instead of Homeland Security securing borders just utilize Active Duty military personnel who are highly trained and actually will cost less as an over all budget. 3. Emphasize trade with all Americas, bump it up as much as possible so that both countries can reap the benefits, ie. more jobs created. Additionally, if there isn't a manufacturing base, then one needs to exist so investments should be made. This will help in the longterm because the Chinese were able to lift 300 million people out of poverty and into the middle class. I believe the same can be made with all the Americas, that will drastically cut down the immigration into the United States. 4. Financial/Fiscal Responsibility is something that needs to be taken care of. I know government is inherently big right now to mildly put it, however both government and corporations lack the ability or the true will to help people. Government is there to protect people, and corporations to give them a means to live but the fact is that government and corporations are too corrupt and there needs to be transparency in everything that is done. I firmly believe that a lot if not 90% of what government does needs to be transparent, the only things that shouldn't be are of a National Security standpoint and should be highly classified. I believe that there needs to be several auditing agencies both government and private that looks over all of the spending and then submits a report I'm guessing every 2-3 years so that all can be compared. 5. Education/Infrastructure/Healthcare/Tax codes need to be desperately revamped because the system is too old and bleeding out quite literally in a figurative language.

I do hope that the USA and its people do have a reversal because honestly I don't want to live in a world where China is the Superpower, and I don't want to live in a world where there are two or more Superpowers or Global Powers because it would be like living in a pre WWII world all over again. Sadly, the situations from back then which included the relocation of Japanese Americans to camps (I call them concentration camps) in the interior of the country is what may or may not happen to the undocumented immigrants. I highly oppose this and would do everything that I could to stop that if it were to happen. I know this is unlikely though, thankfully. But I know that there is a movement that thinks they want another civil war. (crazy right? They don't know that if that were to happen the US would quickly be destroyed by its enemies, divide and conquer) These nut jobs think they can get their country back if there is another civil war and that will just not happen, however I would like to find out more about those people and what are the general perspective or likely hood that something to that effect were to happen. What are your opinions on that people?
Reply to Ederson, Joao da Silva and ASP
written by Ricardo C. Amaral, May 05, 2012

Ricardo: Vivaldi is one of my favorite classical composers and "I Solisti Veneti" and Claudio Scimone is the best group that I know for this kind of music.

About 20 years ago I saw a great concert with this group at the Lincoln Center in New York City - the group was fantastic that day, I have been present at more than 100 classical music concerts in New York and at the Newark Arts Center in Newark, NJ, and I have seen the best symphonic orchestras, and classical music groups in the world, and I would rank "I Solisti Veneti" and Claudio Scimone at the top with the very best.

Yes this is really a six hour Vivaldi video. Just hit play and travel back to 18th century Republic of Venice. Everything is from I Solisti Veneti and Claudio Scimone.

I would suggest buying any CD you can from I Solisti Veneti playing Vivaldi, it is the best!

As I mentioned before Vivaldi is one of my favorite classical music composers, and this group is the best group that I know of that plays Vivaldi music – it is like haven.

Vivaldi music is great and this group is outstanding - you will love it!!!!!

Antonio Vivaldi - I Solisti Veneti - Claudio Scimone, Conductor
http://youtu.be/E2uOGOqIyC4


.
...
written by João da Silva, May 06, 2012

French Presidential Election:

It seems Sarko (ch.c's bosom buddy) lost.smilies/sad.gif.

Hope he goes back to his native Hungary, instead of coming down to Brasil to peddle his Toy Planes.smilies/wink.gif

I bet mah distinguished buddies Rickey, Ederson, Wisemann, ASP, Adrian, et & all have something to comment.smilies/grin.gif
...
written by Double Dot, May 06, 2012

I bet mah distinguished buddies Rickey, Ederson, Wisemann, ASP, Adrian, et & all have something to comment


Well, seeing that you been impersonating me a few times there over the last couple of years João, mah opinion is that a Socialist president of a modern non commodity based economy is like a tickin time bomb. It's a good thing the EU is already sliding into recession. He can pull a classic "Obama" and just shift the blame to the preceding administration ...enjoy watching him stand up to Merkel while the Eurozone goes over the proverbial cliff. Ah love a good soap opera.

Reply to Joao da Silva
written by Ricardo C. Amaral, May 07, 2012

Ricardo: It doesn't matter to me who won the French presidential race as long Nicolas Sarkozy was defeated - as you are aware from my posting here on Brazzil magazine - I thought Nicolas Sarkozy was an a*****e.

And I am glad he lost the election in France.

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Clarification
written by Ricardo C. Amaral, May 07, 2012

I thought Nicolas Sarkozy was an assXXle.

.
Change his name
written by Ederson, May 07, 2012
The new French leader should at least have the courtesy to change his name to something perhaps more French.smilies/wink.gif Tax and spend? What an innovative idea. It's a strategy that seems to have worked well for communists and socialists in the past.
...
written by João da Silva, May 07, 2012
Esteemed Double Dot,

Well, seeing that you been impersonating me a few times there over the last couple of years João, mah opinion is that a Socialist president of a modern non commodity based economy is like a tickin time bomb.


Thanks for debunking Simpleton's theory that "Double Dot" and Da Silva are the same.smilies/wink.gif

However, I share your opinion and that of Edson on the outcome of French Presidential election. But...but...but... with one addition. With or without socialists, Eurozone has already gone over the cliff.It is a question of time before all the countries in Europe go back to their original currencies and start trade war against each other.My contention has always been that the very idea of Euro was flawed right from its inception. IMHO, Germany might have lost the last two wars against the allies, but finally conquered Europe economically. smilies/shocked.gif

I wonder if the Yanks will go to the rescue of their erstwhile "Allies" from Merkel's Blitzkrieg.smilies/wink.gif
Ricardo Amaral
written by João da Silva, May 08, 2012

I thought Nicolas Sarkozy was an assXXle.


Dear Rickey,

You didn't have to clarify and we all understand what exactly you meant.smilies/cheesy.gif

To save your time, I suggest the next time you spell it in Queen's English which is "ARSEHOLE".smilies/smiley.gifsmilies/wink.gifsmilies/cheesy.gifsmilies/grin.gif
Be Careful What You Wish for...
written by adrianerik, May 09, 2012
Economies are like fine liquor...they should be taken in moderation. Like me, many of my 'pragmatic' friends agree that a capitalist/socialist economic mixture is the best recipe. These wide swings are the most troublesome, the extremities that I would call right-wing, quase facist, "some peoople have better blood than others", monopoly-gone-mad Amaralist capitalism to "lets-share-poverty-and-shortage-equally" socialism. Hearkening back to my toes-in-the-dirt farm boy roots, when we had to buy an "icebox" -- refrigerator -- everyone in the family had to do without as we saved money to pay cash (and not pay a higher price on credit) for the thing. Yet when myself and other beneficiaries of crumbling American racism entered college, that same community pooled their money to give those of us without the means to pay for books (or eat lunch) the chance to succeed. Greece and France need to be careful if they think that the rich and middle class exclusively can finance an economic expansion. (I have no problem with taxes, by the way. I believe that Sweden has hit upon a nice balance tax balance). But the two countries who will be hit hardest are Brazil and the United States. Brazil's fragile commodity based growth is based upon their being a middle class in America and Europe to sustain it. A hiccup in Europe is a bad sneeze in America and a chest cold in Brazil. Brazil has not yet cultivated a 'solid' middle class that can support its expansion. Brazil's statistical middle class (1100 to 2300 reais) can barely handle a credit balance of 500 to 2000 reais, and for those who are not behind on their payments, most of that money goes to help keep American factories in business and enrich Brazilian middlemen. The rest goes to the bank in ridiculous interest rates that more than doubles a credit balance every 6 months. Brazil's exports to Europe will be in trouble because, even now, the real is strengthening against the euro. Not a good thing! (we need a better word than 'strength' when talking about exchange rates). Brazil's 'hole card' is that unlike my United States and Europe, the emotional, ideological devils are not in control of the boat. America's liberal and drooling lips Tea Party are purging themselves of their pragmatic moderates. So is Europe. Their economies are going to be run more on emotion than economic sense. Hold on.
Correction.
written by adrianerik, May 09, 2012
Actually the dollar and euro are strengthening against the real. The fundamentals still stand, however. Socialist measures that take middle class money out of the economy or that take protective measures, such as France MIGHT, to protect local industries, will greatly affect Brazil and the United States, whose export sector is keeping the bills paid.
adrianerik
written by João da Silva, May 11, 2012

Be Careful What You Wish for...


I must confess your essay is pretty good, my honored sir. smilies/smiley.gifI especially loved your following statement:

Like me, many of my 'pragmatic' friends agree that a capitalist/socialist economic mixture is the best recipe.


Add me to your group of "pragmatic" friends.smilies/wink.gif

To be honest, Ricardo also shares our vision, though he would hate to admit it.smilies/sad.gif Do you remember his bashing about the wild "privatizações" that were carried out in LatAm in the late 90´s and his pointing out that even the zoos in Argentina were "privatized"?

Hearkening back to my toes-in-the-dirt farm boy roots, when we had to buy an "icebox" -- refrigerator -- everyone in the family had to do without as we saved money to pay cash (and not pay a higher price on credit) for the thing. Yet when myself and other beneficiaries of crumbling American racism entered college, that same community pooled their money to give those of us without the means to pay for books (or eat lunch) the chance to succeed.


Another brilliant comment. I overlook the part of your being "beneficiary" of "crumbling American Racism", though. smilies/cheesy.gif Because I have come across many American WASPS, who underwent the same problems you did,but....but...but...made it big their own way later on in their lives. The same thing is true in Brasil too.smilies/cool.gif

Unfortunately (or fortunately!), I am color blind (figuratively speaking!!!) and I like to create equal opportunities for everyone. Maybe I am too much of an idealist, but doesn't matter. I am not running for any elected officesmilies/smiley.gif
For Ricardo's Eyes Only
written by Ederson, May 12, 2012
http://www.bdsmovement.net/fil...israel.pdf
Ricky, I know as a Brasilain at heart that you favor Brasil's largely neutral stance in the world's affairs, especially in today's highly flammable environment as it concerns the Middle-East and especially after your having described Israel as something of a cancer. The above link may be old news. If it is, ignore it.
If not, the link could prove useful in revealing how others are beginning to view Brasil and its alliance with the Israelis. From the outside, it may appear to some that Brasil is choosing sides. Is there not also a similarity between France and Gadaffi in the 70's? I remember well when Gadaffi realized the French were two-timing him. A lot of Frenchmen, civilians, too. lost their lives because of his anger.
Ederson
written by João da Silva, May 12, 2012

For Ricardo's Eyes Only


Eddie, did it ever occur to you that you might be sued by the descendents of Ian Flemming & James Bond for violating their "Direitos Autorais"?smilies/shocked.gif

I remember well when Gadaffi realized the French were two-timing him. A lot of Frenchmen, civilians, too. lost their lives because of his anger.


I remember too. The ones who lost their lives were caught in "friendly fire", weren't they?>smilies/sad.gif

Cheers
...
written by asp, May 13, 2012
adrian, and joao, count me in with your pragmatic freinds

i want capatalism with a social conciounce
Reply to Ederson
written by Ricardo C. Amaral, May 13, 2012

Ricardo: I wrote an article about that subject, and I listed some countries that Brazil should have close ties regarding the development of the new Brazilian military.

After you watch the video about how Brazil developed its nuclear weapons then you will understand that Brazil does not need Israeli technology regarding its new military industrial complex.


Brazzil Magazine - Monday, 01 August 2011
“The Time Is Now for Brazil to Build a Strong Military! Just Hire Laid-off NASA Scientists”
Written by Ricardo C. Amaral
http://www.brazzil.com/compone...tists.html

...The Brazilian government on its effort to building up large-scale defense companies in Brazil also should create joint ventures with companies such as Rheinmetall AG from Germany, or Alenia Aermacchi from Italy, and other defense industry contractors from Sweden, Switzerland, France, Iran and Japan.


*****


May 9, 2012

SouthAmerica: During the years when Lula was president of Brazil - Lula and his vice president gave many hints over the years that Brazil has many nuclear arms.

I remember reading an article from former president Fernando Henrique Cardoso published about one or 2 years ago where he complains that Brazil has many nuclear warheads which goes against the current Brazilian constitution.


The Brazilian Atomic Bomb (The Secret History) - October 22, 2011
http://youtu.be/vlZthqIsC5w


It seems that Brazil already has the atomic bomb, the result of a top-secret nuclear program developed in early 1960s. The country since 1980 already has had the technology to manufacture them. For the C.I.A Brazil not only has the pump with already manufactured more than 200 nuclear warheads.

Experts say a country that has nuclear submarines, which dominates the whole technique of enriching uranium since the 80's just does not possess the atomic bomb if it doesn't want.

.
Reply to Ederson
written by Ricardo C. Amaral, May 13, 2012

In a nutshell: The Brazilian government and Brazilian corporations should distance themselves from Israel and the Zionists.


.
Joao
written by Ederson, May 13, 2012
Joao, I thought the link might be interesting to Ricky,but the link also highlights a possible tendency for some to think of Brasil as decidedly pro-Shiite. There are several reasons for this, but the ones that quickly come to mind was Brasil's offering of uranium to Iran through Turkey. Brasil's support of Israel's military at the highest levels when Israel's purported enemies are obviously Sunni. For instance, the Palestinians are clearly 99 percent Sunni. In addition, Brasil has been slow to react to the slaughter of civilians in Syria,which are mostly Sunni dominated by Shia, and decided to base its pro-Syrian government decision to reflect that of the Iranian-dominated Lebanese, who may be helping the Syrian government in its struggle against the Syrian people.

I'm far from an expert concerning Brasil's new thrust into the world of Islamic politics, but it is becoming interesting, especially when it appears Brasil is taking sides.

Oh, by the way, the Italians lost an airliner under suspicious circumstances, but I was thinking of UTA Flight 772.
asp
written by João da Silva, May 13, 2012

adrian, and joao, count me in with your pragmatic freinds

i want capatalism with a social conciounce


Hey, ASP. Thank you so much for crawling out of your cabana and condescending to comment. I don't know about Adrian, but.....but....but....., I do appreciate your reply.smilies/wink.gifsmilies/grin.gif

I am not sure if you went through the link Ederson provided in his previous post. Very interesting and I suggest you get off your bunda, read the link and come out with some productive and thought provoking comments.smilies/wink.gifsmilies/cheesy.gif

Ederson
written by João da Silva, May 13, 2012

Oh, by the way, the Italians lost an airliner under suspicious circumstances, but I was thinking of UTA Flight 772.


UTA 772 was a French owned Airlines. It is also called "Forgotten Flight". What do the Eyetalians have anything to do with it?smilies/smiley.gifsmilies/wink.gif

Clue me in, Eddie, because you have more devious mind than mine.smilies/cool.gif

Cheers
Reply to Ederson - Part 1 of 2
written by Ricardo C. Amaral, May 14, 2012

Ricardo: Ederson, here is some of the info regarding the Arab world and Israel published on my articles, and postings at the Elite Trader Economics forum as follows:

“US and EU Are the Past. The Future is Brazil and BRIC” - May 9, 2005
http://www.brazzilmag.com/comp...-bric.html

http://brazilandsyria-lebanonc...ction.html

“...The Summit has many objectives. The most important is a reciprocal re-discovery of two regions with historical affinities and a vast but yet unfulfilled potential in the field of bilateral relations.

Looking to the past, the contact points between the two worlds date back to the Arab presence in the Iberian Peninsula. Human ties between both regions have grown more intense over the past century through migration flows toward South America, which have made a valuable contribution to the social and cultural development of an important number of countries in the region. Today there are over 10 million people of Arab descent who live only in Brazil, not to mention the many South American migrants, particularly Brazilians, that have recently gone the opposite way in search of a new life in the Middle East.

Looking to the future, what we aim at is a partnership between two regions that face similar challenges in the struggle for development. The obvious diversity of their national situations, identities and levels of development does not prevent them from sharing common goals and interests. Countries from both regions share a common vision of peace and economic development with social justice, they base their actions on the respect for international law and multilateralism, they fight for an inclusive, tolerant, multipolar world more conducive to development.”


*****


Israel is "barking up the wrong tree"
http://www.elitetrader.com/vb/...ost261709
2


...October 24, 2009

SouthAmerica: Brazil never gave a s**t about Israel, and the truth is Israel means nothing to Brazil. Brazil has never had any relationship with Israel since the creation of Israel a few decades ago - if you want to believe it or not.

By the way, the only country in the Middle East that has a long history, and great relations with Brazil going back a few decades has been Iraq and Saddam Hussein.

Brazil and Brazilians never cared about Israel, and as a matter of fact in the last year Brazil became a home for a number of Palestinians refugees.

If anything today Brazil care even less about Israel than ever before, since Brazilians have been watching what Israel have been doing to Lebanon, and to the people of Gaza.

If you want to learn a little more about Brazil and the Middle East then read the following article:

Building Bridges Between Brazil and the Arab World
Written by Ricardo C. Amaral
Brazzil magazine
Tuesday, 26 October 2004

http://www.brazzilmag.com/back...world.html

…Brazil and Iraq

In the past, Brazil had a great business relationship with Iraq, and during the years 1976 to 1990 Iraq became one of the major importers of Brazilian products and services. Brazil exported over US$ 30 billion dollars of goods and services to Iraq during that period, a volume of business larger than the business that Brazil had individually with any European country. Iraq was the ideal partner for Brazil at that time, and the Brazilian Ambassador Paulo Tarso Flecha de Lima had been the great architect of this partnership when he lead various commercial trade missions to Baghdad.

The trading with Iraq is the only example that we have of Brazil recycling the petrodollars with one of the petroleum producing countries of the Middle East Brazil bought a lot of oil from Iraq under a special agreement, and Iraq bought from Brazil automobiles, chicken, beef and pork products, tractors, coffee, sugar, military armament, and Brazilian construction companies built the most important infrastructure projects in Iraq. The Brazilian construction company Mendes Júnior employed over 30,000 people in Iraq over the years, and among its most important projects they built the Baghdad-Akashat railroad, a major expressway, an irrigation system at the Tiger and Euphrates rivers.

During these fourteen years the Brazilian government had very close ties with the Iraqi government of Saddam Hussein. Brazil always had some kind of foreign exchange crisis happening, and the Iraqi government was the only Middle East government willing to trade with Brazil at that time. In 1990 Brazil had to accept the United Nations economic embargo against Iraq, but Brazil continued trading with Iraq over the following years under the “United Nations - Oil for Food” program.


.
Reply to Ederson - Part 2 of 2
written by Ricardo C. Amaral, May 14, 2012

Part 2 of 2

In a Nutshell:

Ederson, at the end of the day Brazil has a dog in this fight in the Middle East, since over 10 million people who live in Brazil are descendents from Syrian/Lebanese people, and Brazil also has a long business relationship with the Iraqis.

If anything regarding the Middle East there's a strong human connection between Brazil/Lebanon/Syria and Iraq.

On the other hand regarding the Jewish population in Brazil:

There are various estimates regarding the number of size of the Jewish population in Brazil in 2012. One study estimated that there are about 80,000 Jews living in Brazil in 2012. But there are other estimates that shows that the real number of the Jewish population in Brazil it is closer to 50,000 people.

The current Jewish community is mostly composed of Ashkenazi Jews of German descent and also Sephardic Jews of Spanish, Portuguese, and North African descent; among the North African Jews, a significant number are of Egyptian descent.

Some Jewish scholars say that the only threat facing Judaism in Brazil is the relatively high frequency of intermarriage.

Size of Jewish communities in Brazil

São Paulo, São Paulo: 30,000
Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro: 25,000
Porto Alegre, Rio Grande do Sul: 15,000
Curitiba, Paraná: 1,774
Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais: 1,714
Recife, Pernambuco: 1,173
Belém, Pará: 900
Piracicaba, São Paulo: 700
Salvador, Bahia: 697
Manaus, Amazonas: 627
Brasília, Distrito Federal: 624
Niterói, Rio de Janeiro: 600
Florianópolis, Santa Catarina: 420
Santos, São Paulo: 413
Campinas, São Paulo: 364
Pelotas, Rio Grande do Sul: 330
Santo André, São Paulo: 311
Petrópolis, Rio de Janeiro: 295
Osasco, São Paulo: 261
São Bernardo do Campo, São Paulo: 251
Barueri, São Paulo: 245


***************


Israel is "barking up the wrong tree"
http://www.elitetrader.com/vb/...ost2946189

...September 8, 2010

SouthAmerica: I don't know how many times I have to say that I am agnostic, and I don't care which religion people practice.

I have a bunch of people who are my friends and they are also Jewish – It makes no difference to me if they are Catholic, Protestant, Jewish or if they practice Buddhism.

You must be part of the Jewish Lobby (a political and propaganda arm of Israel) and I can see why you can't grasp the difference between following the Jewish religion and the state of Israel as a country.

As a matter of fact I had a Jewish friend here in New Jersey who thought Israel was a trouble maker and he had no use for Israel. And today the new generation of Americans Jews here in the USA think that Israel represents just a bunch of non-sense.

When you take religion out of the equation then Israel is just a piss ass little country with a small population and of not much value when we think in terms of the 7 billion people that we have on our planet.

In the United States we have more Jews than in Israel, and the new American generation of Jewish kids don't give a s**t about Israel – and many American Jewish kids know that the constant support that the United States gives to Israel goes against the long-term self-interest of the United States as a nation.

There are many things that are happening that gives us a clear signal that the relationship between US/Israel is reaching the end of the line.

We have reached a major turning point in global history and the world is changing as never seen before and there is nothing the Jewish Lobby can do about to stop the events that are already underway.

The world is changing faster than you think, and there is nothing you can do about it on your efforts to try to keep things as they were in the past.

By the way, in relation to Brazil, Israel is irrelevant in every way. Brazil never had any relations with Israel in the past anyway.

The Israeli Prime Minister is the one who showed up in Brazil a few days before the president of Iran was supposed to visit Brazil at the end of last year. He came to Brazil to whine about Brazil's support for Iran.

.
Reply to Ederson
written by Ricardo C. Amaral, May 14, 2012

Ricardo: Ederson, on my above posting I said: "…Brazil and Iraq

In the past, Brazil had a great business relationship with Iraq, and during the years 1976 to 1990 Iraq became one of the major importers of Brazilian products and services. Brazil exported over US$ 30 billion dollars of goods and services to Iraq during that period, a volume of business larger than the business that Brazil had individually with any European country."

To give the correct perspective regarding the amount of business between Brazil and Iraq, that amount of Brazil exported of over US$ 30 billion dollars of goods and services to Iraq during that period, in today's US dollars adjusted for inflation, it is equivalent to at least US$ 100 billion dollars at current prices.

.

...
written by asp, May 14, 2012
well, joao, now that it is getting colder, maybe ill spend less time in the cabana ....

i prefer to observe about the dynamic you asked for may comments about,i dont have an opinion formulated on it..except arms are big business and like drugs, there is a lot of hyprocacy in the air about it

im waiting for the big article on afro brasilian dance for my big statements
asp
written by João da Silva, May 14, 2012

except arms are big business and like drugs, there is a lot of hyprocacy in the air about it


Excellent comment and I have given you my positive vote by clicking the green plus sign on the right side of the board.smilies/cheesy.gif

Arms are big business indeed and that is the reason I celebrated Sarko's defeat with a cold one. I just didn't want our tax Reais to be wasted on 36 Toy fighter planes.smilies/cheesy.gif

Hope I don't get into the s**t list of the feared French Sureté and send Inspector Jack Clouseau after me.smilies/cool.gifsmilies/cry.gif
Regarding the ideal exchange rate between the Brazilian real and US dollar....
written by Ricardo C. Amaral, May 15, 2012

Ricardo: I just posted the following on the Elite Trader Economics forum regarding the exchange rate between the real and US dollar - and also about interest rates in Brazil:

Central Banks and the US Dollar
http://www.elitetrader.com/vb/...enumber=99

May 15, 2012

SouthAmerica: Finally on Monday May 14, 2012 the real reached the exchange rate against the US dollar that I have been suggesting for the last 2 years that it would be the ideal level for the Brazilian economy (the rate of R$ 2.00 = US$ 1.00) - that level will help the manufacturing sector and also tourism in Brazil.

I agree 100 percent with President Dilma Rousseff, and Finance Minister Guido Mantega policy of reducing interest rates in Brazil including the Selic rate, and also all kinds of interest rates in Brazil.

I like to see the Selic rate at 7 percent sometime in 2013 in Brazil.

.





...
written by wisemann, May 15, 2012
3 cheers to Capitalism with a Social conscience......

Good riddance to c**kroach sarkozy.......

This fellow ederson smells like a zionist trojan horse. The Stellenbosch boys would like a word with him.....smilies/cheesy.gifsmilies/grin.gif
...
written by wisemann, May 15, 2012
...and ederson is also welcome to sniff around my backside for my scent.smilies/smiley.gifsmilies/wink.gif
Ezer
written by Ederson, May 16, 2012
Weizman, you make me smile.smilies/wink.gif You have the most popular last name in the Tel Aviv phone book, and you call me a Zionist?
Ricardo
written by Ederson, May 16, 2012
Ricky, I still enjoy reading your blogs. Indeed, I've often wondered if we've met previously. In the past, I somehow gained an image of you sitting at a quiet table, nursing a drink of Dos Equis and in the company of a bevy of beautiful women, all the while regailing them with astounding stories of your life's most incredible adventures, but then I realized there couldn't possibly be two of us.
I don't often drink beer, Ricardo, but when I do...smilies/wink.gif
Reply to Ederson
written by Ricardo C. Amaral, May 16, 2012

Ricardo: Ederson, I never liked beer, but I like a good wine.

My nephew has a movie company with his partners, and often when we get together we talk about the movies – his favorite subject.

I enjoy our conversations and I bring up to his attention some old movies and movie stars of the past that he should watch some of their work, and learn as much as he can from these people.

About a month ago when we went out for dinner, we started talking about the most beautiful and attractive actresses of the last 60 years. And I told my nephew I would make a list of all the movies starts according with my taste regarding woman – most of these stars I ranked them as I remember when they were at the prime of their movie careers, and you can see what I mean on these video clips. Most of these movie stars still alive and some are even dead, but at their prime these women were really beautiful and attractive to me.

Here is the information that I sent to my nephew as follows:

Regarding our conversation of last night about all the movie actresses, and which ones I find most attractive - Here is my list of the top 31 actresses ranked accordingly to my taste in woman:

1) Catherine Deneuve
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j6bUQgvfZM8

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v...=endscreen


2) Heidi Klum
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4yxMWESiT1E


3) Charlize Theron
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G_p7eOHk_e8


4) Candice Bergen
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zgNBtwwurQI


5) Bo Derek
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bAkJlpMWSjg


6) Rachel Welch
http://www.youtube.com/watch?f...pBV1xH8Ods


7) Kim Basinger
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5SRpxwNHa58


smilies/cool.gif Sharon Stone
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ewho1-3pCas


9) Grace Kelly
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YQYOwBEiwg4


10) Michelle Pfeiffer
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YeB58zMPdhU


11) Brigitte Bardot
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c7bTQJ0dw84


12) Jacqueline Bisset
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZB1a0VdSn54


13) Katherine Heigl
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HQ1Wc1k4uMs


14) Claudia Cardinale
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5E_p1aMfqqo


15) Ursula Andress
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m3lAjyUUS1g


16) Sharon Tate
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M2DtuO65fi4


17) Jessica Simpson
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v...re=related


1smilies/cool.gif Jessica Biel
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NKVlekH0h70

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lj990wckAhM


19) Cheryl Tiegs – The first Supermodel
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oNm31thdIaQ

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P3aOQYLcUiY

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TZwyWuNs4sw


20) Jennifer O'Neill
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0oIx4-oN9OU


21) Elke Sommers
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Iwz3JI5xnAQ


22) Cheryl Ladd
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g8ra93cdYXs


23) Jaclyn Smith
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kvpoNhp87Uc


24) Daisy Fuentes
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w4lrM98s01Y


25) Virna Lisi
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eTO_B1yHDSU


26) Monica Vitti
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-rnL_dwOGKQ


27) Barbara Eden
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SAS0VxNPyRQ


2smilies/cool.gif Miou-Miou
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nPAR-UG6C3s


29) Natalie Portman
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Bc4nucaKxoE


30) Radha Mitchell
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v...ature=fvst


31) Catherine Zeta Jones
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kZ0HfuvcC2s

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v...ure=fvwrel

.
Reply to Ricardo
written by wisemann, May 16, 2012
here is my list of favorite actors according to my taste:

1) Ricky Martin

2) RuPaul

3) George Takei

4) Didier Van den Hove

5) Neil Patrick Harris

6) Ben Dover

7) Jizzum King

smilies/cool.gif Likem Large

9) Chad Allen

10) Clay Aiken

11) Liberace

12) Charles Nelson Reilly

13) Lance Bass

14) Long Dong Silver

15) Ten Inch Ted

16) Richard Chamberlain

17) Paul Lynde

1smilies/cool.gif Rodiney Santiago


Reply to wisemann
written by Ricardo C. Amaral, May 16, 2012

Ricardo: Wisemann, I just recognized 4 names from your list: Liberace, Paul Lynde (these two fellows died many years ago, Richard Chamberlain (Dr. Kildare is very old) and Ricky Martin just throw a fund raising party to Barack Obama a few days ago.

The other people on your list I have no idea who they are.

By the way, you will be happy to learn the following, check the information on the 12 min. and 30 sec. of this video:


Gerald Celente - The Jeff Rense Show - 10 May 2012
http://youtu.be/EQBRy8yNUkc

Time: 12 min. 30 sec.


.
...
written by asp, May 17, 2012
hey rickey...as a huge fan of noam chumpsky, you don't know who the f**k neil patrick harris is??? it's f***king doogie howser...probably the biggest simulated recipient of chumpky's b*lls**t affirmative outreach insanity...he was a 15 yr old doctor. only a marxist c**ksu**er like chumpsky could dream that one up. the rest of the flamers on wisemann's list are open homo celebrities.

"Cucumber Slumber" i'm posting the tracks in random order to attempt to throw off the a**h*le. i"ll post a couple of more tracks from different albums and reveal the artists after the third so you know it's me.

Reply to ASP
written by Ricardo C. Amaral, May 17, 2012

Ricardo: ASP, now that you mentioned I remember the TV series of the 1980's with Doogie Howser - he was just a kid and a Dr. in a make believe hospital.

I did not recognized the name of the actor who played Doogie Howser.

It is good that you are up to date about open homo celebrities, but sorry to disappoint you, but that is a subject that I don't pay much attention to it.

Anyway, here is a good video for you to watch:

Noam Chomsky - The Purpose of Education
http://youtu.be/DdNAUJWJN08

.
Another “Heist” well done in Wall Street - Facebook IPO
written by Ricardo C. Amaral, May 17, 2012

Ricardo: Welcome to La La Land....


Facebook - IPO
http://www.elitetrader.com/vb/...genumber=7


Another “Heist” well done in Wall Street - Facebook IPO
http://www.elitetrader.com/vb/...enumber=61


.
Facebook IPO fiasco
written by Ricardo C. Amaral, May 18, 2012

Ricardo: Here is what I posted on the ET stock forum about the Facebook IPO:

Facebook - IPO
http://www.elitetrader.com/vb/...genumber=9

...May 18, 2012

SouthAmerica: The Facebook IPO fiasco did not become a total catastrophe because the underwriters of this IPO did not let the stock price to fall below the original IPO price of US$ 38 per share.

Without the artificial support of the underwriters this stock probably would have headed south to at least US$ 30 per share on its first trading day, and the closing price could have been even in the US$ 20's per share.

To be realistic and optimistic at the same time, because of future potential for the Facebook stock then this stock should be trading in the range of US$ 5 to US$ 10 per share.


*****


Associated Press (AP) – May 18, 2012 – 4:30 PM
Facebook IPO: Who is selling stock?
Facebook IPO: “A look at who's selling shares in the social network”
By The Associated Press | Associated Press

Facebook Inc. sold 180 million of its shares in its initial public stock offering. Another 241.2 million came from existing stockholders, including the company's earliest investors and CEO Mark Zuckerberg.

Even after the IPO, Zuckerberg remains Facebook's single largest shareholder, with 503.6 million shares. And he will control the company with 56 percent of its voting stock.

The IPO sold at $38 per share, generating $6.8 billion for Facebook and $9.2 billion, collectively, for existing stockholders.

Here's a look at early Facebook Inc. investors who sold stock in the IPO, how much money they gained and how many shares they still own.

— Mark Zuckerberg
Number of shares being offered: 30.2 million
Value: $1.15 billion
Number of shares still owned: 503.6 million

— James Breyer and Accel Partners, where he's a partner
Year invested in Facebook: 2005
Number of shares being offered: 49 million
Value: $1.86 billion
Number of shares still owned: 152.3 million

— Peter Thiel, managing partner at The Founders Fund and PayPal co-founder
Year invested in Facebook: 2004
Number of shares being offered: 16.8 million
Value: $640 million
Number of shares still owned: 27.9 million

— DST Global Ltd. and affiliates, a London-based, Russian-founded investment firm focused on Internet companies and founded by Yuri Milner
Year invested in Facebook: 2009 and late 2010
Number of shares being offered: 45.7 million
Value: $1.74 billion
Number of shares still owned: 85.6 million

— Goldman Sachs and affiliates, investment bank and one of the IPO's underwriters
Year invested in Facebook: 2011
Number of shares being offered: 28.7 million
Value: $1.09 billion
Number of shares still owned: 37.3 million

— Elevation Partners, private equity firm focused on media and technology and affiliates
Year invested in Facebook: Undisclosed
Number of shares being offered: 4.6 million
Value: $176 million
Number of shares still owned: 35.5 million

— Greylock Partners, Silicon Valley venture capital firm and affiliates
Year invested in Facebook: 2006
Number of shares being offered: 7.6 million
Value: $289 million
Number of shares still owned: 29 million

— Mail.ru Group Ltd., Russian Internet company
Year invested in Facebook: 2009
Number of shares being offered: 19.6 million
Value: $745 million
Number of shares still owned: 36.8 million

— Mark Pincus, Zynga Inc. CEO
Year invested in Facebook: 2004
Number of shares being offered: 1 million
Value: $38 million
Number of shares still owned: 4.3 million

— Meritech Capital Partners, venture capital firm focused on late-stage investments
Year invested in Facebook: 2006
Number of shares being offered: 7 million
Value: $266 million
Number of shares still owned: 33.4 million

— Microsoft Corp.
Year invested in Facebook: 2007
Number of shares being offered: 6.6 million
Value: $249 million
Number of shares still owned: 26.2 million

— Reid Hoffman, co-founder of LinkedIn Corp. and affiliates
Year invested in Facebook: 2004
Number of shares being offered: 942,784
Value: $36 million
Number of shares still owned: 3.8 million

— Tiger Global Management, New York-based investment firm
Year invested in Facebook: Undisclosed
Number of shares being offered: 23.4 million
Value: $889 million
Number of shares still owned: 30.4 million

— Other, smaller stockholders are offering another 70,504 shares.
Value: $2.7 million

Source: Facebook and Associated Press calculations

.
Here is a related stock to the Facebook IPO
written by Ricardo C. Amaral, May 18, 2012

May 18, 2012

SouthAmerica: Here is a related stock to the Facebook IPO.


Wall Street Journal – Market Beat - January 25, 2012
Four Out Of Five Underwriters Agree: Buy Zynga

By Chris Dieterich

The consensus among investment banks that helped launch Zynga’s initial public offering: buy the stock.

Wednesday marks the first time that analysts at underwriting banks can issue stock recommendations for Zynga, and four out of five were bullish on the San Francisco social game maker.

Goldman Sachs, Morgan Stanley, JPMorgan and Barclays Capital each gave Zynga buy-equivalent ratings. Bank of America Merrill Lynch was more cautious, rating the stock at “neutral.”


Source: http://blogs.wsj.com/marketbea...buy-zynga/


*****


Zynga's performance:


December 16, 2011 - Zynga IPO price = US$ 10

May 18, 2012 – Zynga current market price = US$ 7


.
Regarding the G-8 Summit in Camp David on May 18-19, 2012
written by Ricardo C. Amaral, May 19, 2012

Ricardo: Regarding this weekend G-8 Summit in Camp David. Camp David is the country retreat of the President of the United States and his guests, and it's located close to Washington, D.C., It is officially known as “Naval Support Facility Thurmont” and is technically a military installation.

Here is the main event, and the major reason for this G-8 meeting:

http://www.elitetrader.com/vb/...did=242875

.

Reply to ASP
written by Ricardo C. Amaral, May 19, 2012

Ricardo: ASP, do you like this one:

Hank Williams Jr.: A Country Boy Can Survive
http://youtu.be/I4s0nzsU1Wg


.
Ricky! Say it ain't so!
written by Ederson, May 19, 2012
Rickardo, you have surprised me! Do you have an awareness of Hank Williams Jr? Never could I possibly have imagined, until now, that you even knew who Hank Williams Jr. was.smilies/wink.gif You are obviously a person of many interesting dimensions. Although you deny that you drink beer, I believe that I now have evidence that indicates perhaps you do.smilies/wink.gif
I'm now shocked that Ali MacGraw didn't make it to your list of top beautiful women. If you don't know who Ali MacGraw is/was, she was an American actress born in the thirties that stayed incredibly pretty all the way into the seventies when she charmed my very young imagination. Very colloquial in appearance and vocabulary and even had a crooked tooth. From the outside looking in, she was Yankee/country cool. I'm told that nearly exact replicas of her can be found throughout Argentina.
Reply to Ederson
written by Ricardo C. Amaral, May 19, 2012

Ricardo: Ederson, Ali MacGraw was a movie star of the 1970's and her big picture was "Love Story" in 1970 and "The Getaway" with Steve Mcqueen in 1972. She qualifies to be number 32 on my list.

Please don't forget that I probably left out of my list many woman who deserve to be on that list.

By the way, I did try to drink beer a number of times over the years, but I just don't like the taste of beer - any kind of beer.

Here is the “theme song” of the G-8 Summit in Camp David on May 18-19, 2012.

The G-8 have adopted this song as the “theme song” of the G-8, and they will be playing this song on a regular basis in all of their G-8 meetings:

That Sinking Feeling
http://youtu.be/ik9BEaBU7M0


***

That Sinking Feeling

All my books lay on the table
Waitin' to unfold
I sit and stare at my reflection
While the darkness chills my bones
My head fills like a junk shop
In desperate need of repair
The path of least resistance leads to the
Garbage heap of despair
I think I'd better get back in bed

I'm just a symptom of the moral decay
That's gnawing at the heart of the country.

You can't destroy your problems
By destroying yourself
Death is not the answer
For your soul may burn in hell
My memory my fond deceiver
Is turning all my past into pain
While I'm being raped by progress
Tomorrow's world is here to stay
They wouldn't have it any other way

I'm just a symptom of the moral decay
That's gnawing at the heart of the country.

.
Ederson
written by João da Silva, May 19, 2012


I'm now shocked that Ali MacGraw didn't make it to your list of top beautiful women. If you don't know who Ali MacGraw is/was


I am equally shocked at your outburst. Never mind. Is this Ali (obviously, she is a Mohammedan) a Sunni,Shiite or Sufi? Clue me in, please.smilies/cool.gif
Ricardo deserves more credit
written by Ederson, May 19, 2012
Ricardo, I enjoy your posts, even those of a lighter nature. smilies/wink.gif I need, however, to give you more credit when I quote you to my friends. Because of you, I undoubtedly appear much more intelligent, several inches taller, and broader at the shoulders than I actually am whenever I discuss the world's economic situation. Thanks.
Joao and Ali MacGraw
written by Ederson, May 19, 2012
Joao, if after I should pass away to that great Carnaval in the sky and if Saint Peter should offer me the choice between my very own personalized Tucono and an opportunity to fly with the Smoke Team, or a lifetime with Ali MacGraw, my choice will be without hesitation! I'd wrap my arms around my new Tacano in a heartbeat! Still, between my practice sessions with the team, I'd enjoy spending a great deal of time with Ali MacGraw. She may not be perfect, but 99.999 percent is close enough for my tastes. Now that would be heaven!smilies/wink.gif
Ederson
written by João da Silva, May 20, 2012

Joao, if after I should pass away to that great Carnaval in the sky and if Saint Peter should offer me the choice between my very own personalized Tucono


I know, I know, I know, you are trying to promote our EMBRAER aircraft and your efforts are laudable and I appreciate it.smilies/cheesy.gif

Last week my wife was on a business trip and it was the first time she was on an EMBRAER aircraft ( She couldn't say whether whether it was 145 or 145 XR). But she loved the comfort (especially the leg room and the 4 seats per row.) She was convinced that we Brasilians do make good aircraft.smilies/cheesy.gif

BTW, you seem to have a crush on this Ali MacGraw.smilies/shocked.gif Does your wife know about this?smilies/wink.gif
...
written by asp, May 20, 2012
ricy, jerko got me again....i didnt post the last two things

god , he even got my "chumpski" thing and my list thing down

get me the f**k out of here..i have to double check to see if someone is impersonating me
...
written by asp, May 20, 2012
acualy just the one before is jerko in action

by the way, no i dont like country music tham much, that is joao's bag, he also loves sertaneja universiatario....or maybe he said he lives near the university....
asp
written by João da Silva, May 20, 2012

by the way, no i dont like country music tham much, that is joao's bag, he also loves sertaneja universiatario.


I consider it as a malicious comment, ASP. In spite of it, I punched the green plus sign for the sake of our old friendship.smilies/angry.gifsmilies/shocked.gif

I never heard of this "serteneja universiatario". Perhaps you are referring to the cacophonic music the "professional" students play during their lunch break. If so, rest assured that I have lodged a complaint with the "highest authorities" in the Federal University which is located within the walking distance from where I live. smilies/cool.gif

BTW, would you mind getting off your butt and ask the PMs in your Bairro to put back the traffic sign boards to give right directions to reach your leaky cabana?? smilies/wink.gif

Before I forget, have you taken your anti flu shot yet? The "promoção" ends by May 31st.smilies/smiley.gifsmilies/wink.gifsmilies/cheesy.gif
Reply to Ederson
written by Ricardo C. Amaral, May 21, 2012

Ricardo: You are welcome, I am glad that at least you appreciate most of the information that I post here on Brazzil magazine.

I just posted the following on the Elite Trader Economics forum:

May 21, 2012

SouthAmerica: Marc Faber estimates that China's economy will grow only by 3 to 5 percent in the coming year compared with the official forecast of the Chinese government of 7. 5 percent.


'World to be dominated by China-US connection' – May 6, 2012
http://youtu.be/k7qzNeTFALI


China's rampant economic growth and political influence continues raising numerous questions about the outcomes of this growth. China expert and author John Naisbitt told RT that the world is soon to be dominated by US-China relations.


*****


Marc Faber - NDTV interview 16 May 2012
http://youtu.be/2Bms8AUe0ZM


Marc Faber estimates that China's economy will grow only by 3 to 5 percent in the coming year compared with the official forecast of the Chinese government of 7. 5 percent.


.
Reply to Ederson
written by Ricardo C. Amaral, May 21, 2012

Ricardo: You also might enjoy watching these videos:


No War for Israel in Iran - by George Galloway – May 20, 2012
http://youtu.be/lIhzNCSfHx0



I just found on the web this video about Facebook:

It is a funny video, but I wonder how many people who use Facebook on a regular basis use it like these morons.

Facebook
http://youtu.be/LRKPY6geKV0



*****


Regarding China I also just found this presentation about the economy of US vs. China


Larry Edelson: US vs. China – May 11, 2012
The Great Betrayal of 2012

http://youtu.be/n8g_Ok6LIpI


This warning issued by Larry Edelson is alarming to say the least, and even more so considering Mr. Edelson's credibility. We must take head. It has happened in the past with other great nations and kingdoms and it is going to happen to America. We have just lost an economic war to the new world super power: CHINA


*****


Larry Edelson: Uncommon Wisdom Daily
http://www.uncommonwisdomdaily...ry-edelson


Frequently quoted in international press, including Forbes, Bloomberg, CBS MarketWatch and more, Mr. Edelson travels extensively through Asia each year, bringing his followers first-hand analysis and accounts of the vibrant emerging economies.


.
Marc Faber
written by Ricardo C. Amaral, May 21, 2012

Ricardo: Marc Faber is an interesting character, and he is often interviewed on the various business news programs on the US TV.

Marc Faber - Bio
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marc_Faber


.
.
...
written by asp, May 21, 2012
joao, got my flu shot, you cant go without it down here, right?

the police in my barrio are non existant...
Ricardo, Galloway is wrong.
written by Ederson, May 21, 2012
Ricky, Galloway needs to narrow his assertions. When he said that Iraq had no weapons of mass destruction, he was clearly incorrect. Iraq had a history at the time of utilizing WMD on a horrific scale. Ask the Kurds. It was well documented, even if the Yanks tried to involve the Iranians in the gassing attacks toward the end.

Will the Iranians fight back? Of course. It is stupidity to think that they wouldn't. As I've said before, the Iranians appear to enjoy militant struggle at any level. The war of the cities, anyone? Human wave assaults. The swamp wars? The low cost human-powered land mind detector? The plastic keys? The Iranians are capable of giving back whatever they get. When I was young, one of my very best friends, also quite young and Iranian, used to regal me with recollections of his Iranian unit's initial struggles against the Iraqi tanks. He recalled his adventures with humor but also with mental exhaustion.

Will Israel nuke Iran? I don't know. I wouldn't see what good it woulr do unless it was meant to be a precise strike on an individual target. Iran is not a tiny country. A better hope would be a regime change; the world hoped for such a miracle,but PBO, who was happy to get involved in Libya and the Arab Spring, thought the Iranian people's struggle for democracy was not in the Yankee interest. I guess he's pro Sunni, which puts him at odds with Brasil, in a way. Gosh, upon reflection, perhaps he is pro Shiitesmilies/wink.gif, which would explain why the Yanks have done little against the Syrian government except blabber. Maybe the Yanks, Brasil, and Israel are together on this page.smilies/tongue.gif

Whatever the case, it sure is complicated, and I don't see this mess getting straightened out, if ever. I'm just an interested spectator.

Enjoyed the video link. Thanks
Reply to ASP
written by Ricardo C. Amaral, May 21, 2012

Ricardo: ASP, I hope you will enjoy watching this video:


Noam Chomsky "Corporate Attack on Education" – April 2, 2012
http://youtu.be/8AU9lw_dFkY


"Noam Chomsky talks of the longstanding hostility of the rich to truly educating the public so they don't realize they are victims of an economic system they need to replace with one that truly serves the public. March 16, 2012 Special thanks to Rev. Rhonda Rubinson of St. Philip's Church of Harlem for facilitating this production.

.
...
written by João da Silva, May 21, 2012

Whatever the case, it sure is complicated, and I don't see this mess getting straightened out, if ever. I'm just an interested spectator.


I am also just another interested spectator.smilies/wink.gifsmilies/cheesy.gifsmilies/grin.gif
Ederson
written by João da Silva, May 21, 2012

I guess he's pro Sunni, which puts him at odds with Brasil, in a way. Gosh, upon reflection, perhaps he is pro Shiite, which would explain why the Yanks have done little against the Syrian government except blabber. Maybe the Yanks, Brasil, and Israel are together on this page.


No Eddie, I beg to differ from you regarding the Yanks "doing a little against Dr.Bashir Assad's government". The good Ophthalmologist is indeed the puppet of Her Majesty's government and I do appreciate Brasil's "neutral" stance when coming to the question Middle East politics. We do have very good diplomatic and trade relationship with Israel and I for one would not like to see our government take a negative stance toward that country. However, it is time for a "regime change" in Israel too through ballot. Too many old "warriors" ruling that country for decades ever since its founding and they should retire and let younger generation take over.
Joao, Her majesty's service?
written by Ederson, May 21, 2012
Joao, I yield to your extended knowledge of the Middle-East.smilies/smiley.gif I refuse to counter or disagree with anything you write on this forum.
The Failure of the Summit of the Americas VI
written by Ricardo C. Amaral, May 22, 2012

Ricardo: I just posted on the Elite Trader Economics Forum an interesting article about the USA vs. South America.

I have been documenting on my articles for many years the fast decline of influence, clout, prestige, and power of the United States in South America.


The Crumbling of America
http://www.elitetrader.com/vb/...enumber=20


Tuesday, May 15, 2012
The Failure of the Summit of the Americas VI
By: Raul Zibechi

Dilma Rousseff interrupted the speech of Barack Obama. The President of the United States was speaking about the advances of various countries in Latin America, commenting that now there exists “a prosperous middle class” that represents a business opportunity for companies from his country. “Suddenly, they are interested in buying iPads, interested in buying planes from Boeing.” “Or Embraer,” interjected Dilma, yielding applause.


...This analysis holds that the five years of Nikolas Sarkozy’s administration were characterized by “a subordination without recent precedent in the country’s history to the dominant power of the United States.” It goes further: it assures that the only period in which there was a similar abandonment of national sovereignty was during the Vichy Regime when France was controlled by Nazi Germany.

With the triumph of Hollande, two facts will come to pass that will have a serious repercussion on Latin America: France’s adoption of a policy of European independence as a “strategic priority” and its warming up to emerging countries in order to establish a Europe-BRICS alliance.

.
Ederson
written by João da Silva, May 22, 2012

Joao, Her majesty's service?


Sorry. I should have said "Her Majesty's Secret Service". Aging Jimmy Bond & Late Ian would be proud of me.smilies/wink.gifsmilies/cheesy.gifsmilies/grin.gif

Joao, I yield to your extended knowledge of the Middle-East


Now, now, .....................I always thought you were the expert on the Middle-Eastern "affairs". Never stepped in there, though flown over it. smilies/wink.gifsmilies/cheesy.gifsmilies/grin.gif
Ederson is not an expert!
written by Ederson, May 22, 2012
Joao, I am not an expert on the Middle-East despite the brilliance of my assertions, the thoroughness of my analysis, and my devotion to historical fact. Indeed, I am more interested in Africa, particularly sub-Sahara Africa. However, the ruthlessness to which that portion of the continent is being subjected causes me to give a great deal of attention to what is happening in a broader context in the Middle-East.smilies/wink.gif How long have I been pointing out the disaster that awaits Nigeria, and now Niger and Mali? The poor Toubou and Tuareg.

In addition, I agree with the current Brasilian foreign policy, even if it only appears that Brasil is siding with the Israelis and Shiites. If anyone thinks Brasil can maintain its neutrality forever, then they must certainly also believe that Brasil is a plum set too high on the tree to be plucked.smilies/wink.gif
Nationalist presidents in Brazil
written by pimp, November 29, 2012
What is the successes and the failures?????? i need help on this?
Nationalist president in Brazil
written by pimp, November 29, 2012
What is the successes and failures in brazil in (1962-64)?
prophetharry is the best spell caster in restoring relationship issues
written by andrewjean, January 04, 2013


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andrewjean
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Thank you Doctor
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