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maverickpix


Newbie
   

Hey Guest,

Not a problem for correcting Marqueseazy on his mis-information. That's what this forum is all about and appreciate all your input...whether it's specifically related to my topic or not...it's still related to Brazil and Brazilian people..so thank you for all this helpful and useful information, so I can go back to enlightening all my friends with such facts!

Maverick

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Mo

Total Posts: 20 | Joined Jan. 2003 | Posted on: 9:39 am on Jan. 21, 2003 | IP
MARQUESEAZY


Junior Member
   
THE ONE DROP RULE WILL ALWAYS EXIST IN AMERICA PLUS MOST BIRACIALS IDENTIFY AS BLACK AND NOT BIRACIAL I DARE ANYBODY TO PROVE ME WRONG ON THAT JUST CAUSE BIRACIALS ARE HALF WHITE THEY DONT IDENTIFY WITH IT THEY IDENTIFY WITH THEIR BLACK HALF.IN AMERICA THE ONE DROP RULE MAKES YOU BLACK AND IN BRAZIL THE ONE DROP RULE MAKES YOU WHITE OR MULATTO

Total Posts: 88 | Joined Jan. 2003 | Posted on: 3:58 pm on Jan. 22, 2003 | IP
Toolio


Newbie
   
Maverick,

I just read this thread--a little late, so I apologize.

I have only one thing to say: I think it's apparent from the replies that in order to make your movie you must visit Brasil first. Believe me, it's the only way to even scratch the surface.

I'm a Canadian living here. I couldn't imagine making a film or writing a book involving Brasil or Brasilians without spending some time in the country. I realize your film will be set in the U.S., but it can only be enhanced by a visit here.



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Toolio

Total Posts: 12 | Joined Jan. 2003 | Posted on: 4:07 am on Jan. 23, 2003 | IP
maverickpix


Newbie
   

Hi Toolio,

Many thanks for your e-mail...and I hear ya! I know I have to visit Brazil...it's as simple as that and I am hoping to do so later this year. It is always nice though to get some useful research also!

Mo

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Mo

Total Posts: 20 | Joined Jan. 2003 | Posted on: 9:20 am on Jan. 24, 2003 | IP
chachanj



Newbie
   
Hi,
Not to switch the subject again, but I noted a post about Brazilians living in Philadelphia. I had the pleasure of dating a nice brazilian girl, and learned a bit about the culture.  Where do the Brazilians hang out in Philly. I know of Brasils Nightclub & Restarurant in Old City, but never heard of any other place.  Thanks.

Total Posts: 1 | Joined Jan. 2003 | Posted on: 5:54 pm on Jan. 25, 2003 | IP
Macunaima


Member
   
Marqueseazy:

Actually, you are quite wrong on the one-drop rule. That might be the ideology in the States, but the practice is other.

There's this phenomenon called "passing" whereby people with far more than "one drop" of African blood in them but who are light colored and without noticibly African features cross over into the "white" category.

Furthermore, the whole racial category "Latin" is beginning to be something like "mulato" in the U.S. Not white, but not really black, either.

Reality is a lot more complicated than ideology would make it.

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Brazil is the country of the future and always will be!

Total Posts: 147 | Joined Jan. 2003 | Posted on: 10:41 am on Jan. 30, 2003 | IP
Guest



Anonymous
   
LOL, I sit back and watch how some of you pass misinformation about practices in the US. Oh well who am I to debate. I think the whole idea of race is silly and doens't make any sense. I'd rather deal with nationality and enthic make-up than this whole notion of race.

It boggles the mind that so many still live in antiquated ways and times.

Anyways carry one.

Total Posts: 211 | Joined Dec. 2002 | Posted on: 12:18 pm on Jan. 30, 2003 | IP
Adam


Junior Member
   
Excerpt from "Little Brazil."
(Dona Dahlia was the "go-to woman" when it came to newly arrived Brasilians looking for a place to live in New York.)

Home at last

        A Brazilian friend, Nelsinho told me the poignant tale of his arrival in New York. He flew alone from Rio into Kennedy Airport; he knew no one in New York and spoke no English. After an uneventful passage through immigration control, he got his luggage and hailed a cab to take him to Dona Dahlia's rooming house in Queens.
        After driving for a while, the cab driver wrote Nelsinho a note indicating that the fare was going to be $110. Nelsinho had $1000 on him but he knew that this was a rip off--the fare should have been no more than $30.  When Nelsinho, through gestures, let it be known that he had no intention of paying that amount, the cab driver uncerimoniously dumped him and his luggage at a gas station along the Long Island Expressway.
        The gas station attendant called for another cab; one of the few English words Nelsinho knew was "taxi," which is the same in Portuguese. When the attendant asked for money to pay for the phone call, Nelsinho refused because he did not know what a "quarter" was and he thought the attendant was demanding a bribe from him.
       The second cab arrived and took him to the address, purportedly Dona Dahlia's house, written on a piece of paper given to Nelsinho by a friend before he left Rio. No one was there and the house seemed deserted. The driver then stopped at a telephone booth and called the number written on the piece of paper. He had been told the rooming house moved to a new location five blocks away. Luckily, Dona Dahlia has kept the same telephone number. The cab driver drove to the second address, a private house. Nelsinho got out of the cab and rang the bell; a woman, Dona Dahlia came to the front door. "Voce e Brasiliero? Are you Brazilian?," she inquired. Nelsinho felt his eyes sting as they filled with tears.

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Tchau

Total Posts: 64 | Joined Dec. 2002 | Posted on: 9:16 pm on Jan. 31, 2003 | IP
Guest



Anonymous
   
Beautiful, thanks Adamn for that. Where can one find this book? Seems extremely inspiring and I agree with your final statement, we must be that change we want to see instead of bickering see the beauty and be that!

Obrigado!

Total Posts: 211 | Joined Dec. 2002 | Posted on: 10:16 pm on Jan. 31, 2003 | IP
Adam


Junior Member
   
Guest,

thanks for your response...go to the second post on this thread, give the isbn (international book number) to your local book retailer and they can find it for you.

-Tchau

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Tchau

Total Posts: 64 | Joined Dec. 2002 | Posted on: 11:08 pm on Jan. 31, 2003 | IP
Adam


Junior Member
   
I felt like doing a few more for your enjoyment.
Excerpts from "Little Brazil"

Disapearing Act

A journalist for O Globo, a major Brazilian newspaper, interviewed 30 Brazilians from Governador Valadares who had been aprehended by the authorities in Mexico City. They were put up in a hotel there, and she interviewed them over a period of several days. Twenty-eight were headed for Boston, one was going to Newark, and one was going to California. She noticed that fewer and fewer Brazilians were around with each passing day, until only three remained in the hotel. They told her that the others had slipped away and were making their way to the US border. Then they bid her ate logo--goodbye--and also silently vanished to parts unknown.

Valadares Jokes

There are now so many Brazilians from Governador Valadares in the United States that there are jokes about it. The town, jokingly renamed Governador Vala(dolares), is said to be a fantasma, an apparition that does not really exist, because nearly everyone has left for the United States. It is also said that for the few people who remain, "mass is celebrated in English."
When I was visitiing the largest Brazilian-owned remittance agency in Manhattan, I struck up a conversation with a woman who was from Governador Valadares. She told me that it is not true that everyone has left Valadares for the United States. "I know there are at least two people still there--my mother and my sister."

Town to Town

Residents of Governador Valadares mainly migrate to Boston, Newark, N.J., and Danbury, Conn. Brazilians from other towns or states also tend to settle in particular places in the United States. People from the states of Goias and Bahia go to San Francisco; there is also an enclave of people from Goias living in Austin, Texas. Natives of the city Belem, at the mouth of the Amazon River, head for Miami. Citizens of Lajes, in the state of Santa Catarina, are found in Concord and Franconia, N.H. Mineiros from Pocos de Caldas make their way to White Plains and Mount Vernon in Westchester County, N.Y. Residents of the tiny town of Tiros, in central Minas Gerais, live in Long Branch, N.J.

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Tchau

Total Posts: 64 | Joined Dec. 2002 | Posted on: 8:12 pm on Feb. 1, 2003 | IP
 

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