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maverickpix


Newbie
   

HELP! Okay, I am a young British Film Director looking to make a feature film in New York end of this year. The films is a Brazilian Romantic Comedy set in New York, but it's in English not Portoguese, it's fantastic story with huge potential.
Not being Brazilian myself, it's hard to get beneath the surface of the Brazilian culture, I am looking for research material about Brazilians - their cultural nuances, some hip dialogue that they speak...I am basically looking to enrich my story and Characters with Brazilian culture....can anyone help? Suggestions? Idea's? References?

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Mo

Total Posts: 20 | Joined Jan. 2003 | Posted on: 8:46 am on Jan. 2, 2003 | IP
Paulista



Newbie
   
There is a book that studies the Brazilian population in New York that might help you. This is the info on the book from its publisher.



http://pup.princeton.edu/titles/5292.html

Little Brazil:
An Ethnography of Brazilian Immigrants in New York City
Maxine L. Margolis

Paper | 1993 | $28.00 / £19.95 | ISBN: 0-691-00056-5
360 pp. | 6 x 9 | 16 halftones 3 maps


Walking west on 46th Street in Manhattan, just three blocks from Rockefeller Center, one passes Brazilian restaurants, the office of New York's Brazilian newspaper, a Brazilian travel agency, a business that sends remittances and wires flowers to Brazil, and a store that sells Brazilian food products, magazines, newspapers, videos, and tapes. These businesses are the tip of an ethnic iceberg, an unseen minority estimated to number some 80,000 to 100,000 Brazilians in the New York metropolitan area alone. Despite their numbers, the lives of these people remain largely hidden to scholars and the public alike. Now Maxine L. Margolis remedies this neglect with a fascinating and accessible account of the lives of New York's Brazilians.

Showing that these immigrants belie American stereotypes, Margolis reveals that they are largely from the middle strata of Brazilian society: many, in fact, have university educations. Not driven by dire poverty or political repression, they are fleeing from chaotic economic conditions that prevent them from maintaining amiddle-class standard of living in Brazil. But despite their class origin and education, with little English and no work papers, many are forced to take menial jobs after their arrival in the United States. Little Brazil is not an insentient statistical portrait of this population writ large, but a nuanced account that captures what it is like to be a new immigrant in this most cosmopolitan of world cities.

Table of Contents:

List of Illustrations xi
List of Tables xiii
Preface xv
Chapter 1. The New Voyagers 3
Chapter 2. Bye-Bye, Brazil 31
Chapter 3. First Days 59
Chapter 4. Who Are They? 83
Chapter 5. Making a Living 109
Chapter 6. From Mistress to Servant 121
Chapter 7. Shoe Shine "Boys" and Go-Go "Girls" 149
Chapter 8. Life and Leisure in the Big Apple 167
Chapter 9. Little Brazil: Is It a Community? 195
Chapter 10. Class Pictures 220
Chapter 11. An Invisible Minority 242
Chapter 12. Sojourner or Immigrant? 258
Notes 277
Glossary of Portuguese and Brazilian-American Terms 301
References 305
Index 323



Total Posts: 12 | Joined Dec. 2002 | Posted on: 8:57 am on Jan. 2, 2003 | IP
maverickpix


Newbie
   
Hey Paulista,

Many thanks for your reply. Are you Brazilian yourself?

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Mo

Total Posts: 20 | Joined Jan. 2003 | Posted on: 8:58 am on Jan. 2, 2003 | IP
Guest



Anonymous
   
Brazilians in New York are a diffrent breed. But at the same time we try to hold on to the culture of the "Old Country" in the summer the place to go is Far Rockaway beach on 116 St. You can't miss the brazilians, G-strings, looking for the perfect tan and live music. There is a lot of clubs to go to, but the most popular one is SOB's (Sounds Of Brazil) Saturday night is Brazilian night, live bands, some from Brazil, some local, and at 2:AM The Manhattan Samba School takes over the stage and brings everyone to a frenzy with the sounds of Batucada, is a saturday tradition in here, everybody knows everybody, and is a great feeling to walk in there after a hard work week and find the same familiar smiling faces, giving you a hug. Brazilians in here are scatter in all boroughs, but Astoria, in Queens seems to have the larges population, also in Newark, New Jersey is even larger. The largest celebrations in here are the Brazilian Independence Day Festivals both in New York and New Jersey, Usually on the first Sunday of September (NY) and the second Sunday of September (NJ) their ia Carnaval Balls in February everywhere and Brazilian groups in almost every parade, from Gay Pride, to Halloween. I'm updating my homepage right now but you can check it out anyway the address is http://wtv-zone.com/brazilinnewyork soon to be http://brazilinnewyork.com since I bought the domain 2 weeks ago, anything else I can help you with let me know. Take care and good luck. Sambagirl

Total Posts: 211 | Joined Dec. 2002 | Posted on: 10:41 am on Jan. 2, 2003 | IP
Sick



Newbie
   
It's my opinion, that any excuse to go to Brasil is a good one. I highly recommend you go to the source, it will be worth your while on so many levels.

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I have the best hair on this website.

Total Posts: 27 | Joined Dec. 2002 | Posted on: 11:01 am on Jan. 2, 2003 | IP
maverickpix


Newbie
   
Hey people,

Thank you so much for your reply..I never knew that Brazilians in New York are a different breed? Why is that? If a Brazilian moves to New York for 5 years say, do they change? Do they become more Americanised or what? Do they hold onto their roots when they leave Brazil for another country? I know Brazilians have a passion and vitality for life unlike any other culture, even in the face of such poverty and hardship. What else make the culure and people so special and unique and so different to other South American countries?

...I also don't need any excuses to go to Brazil, I think one would be stupid not to visit Brazil and I certainly will at some point this year.

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Mo

Total Posts: 20 | Joined Jan. 2003 | Posted on: 6:10 am on Jan. 3, 2003 | IP
Lucas


Newbie
   
A lot of brazilians who went to live in another countries are coming back, besides all the difficulties they may find here, they can't stand saudade of being away from their home, family and customs.

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Lucas, um usuário convicto (mas não fanático) de Macintosh

Total Posts: 39 | Joined Dec. 2002 | Posted on: 3:39 pm on Jan. 4, 2003 | IP
sambagirl


Newbie
   
Yes, at least Brazilians in NY are a little
different than those in California or
Florida, I have been to those states for
brazilian celebrations and I can say that
in here (NY) the community felling is not
as strong, but understandable since NY is
such a large place and at the same time
very crowded city. During brazilian
celebrations is when you get the felling
that the community comes together. I think
that one way to solve that is by getting
involve a little more in politics so we can
become a larger voice. I also want to
clarify that unlike "Little Italy" or
"Chinatown", "Little Brazil" is not a
community, Little Brazil is the the middle
of Times Square one of the most expensive
realty in NYC, all you find in Little
Brazil are buissness and not all of them
Brazilian. Newark, NJ has a more "Little
Brazil" community than NY does.

Beijos & Abraços, Sambagirl
http://wtv-zone.com/brazilinnewyork

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http://wtv-zone.com/brazilinnewyork

Total Posts: 1 | Joined Jan. 2003 | Posted on: 2:15 am on Jan. 5, 2003 | IP
fernandobn


Junior Member
   
Here in Seattle, Portland our communitty is getting bigger every year not as big as NY/NJ. Everyone is welcome to enjoy! In Portland area we have a Brazilian party every year in an Farm owned by an American married with a Brazilian, far enough to play batucada and have fun without bothering the neighborhood.  

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Fernando B.

Total Posts: 55 | Joined Dec. 2002 | Posted on: 2:35 pm on Jan. 5, 2003 | IP
maverickpix


Newbie
   
Thanks for your replies guys,
 
'they can't stand saudade of being away from their home'   What does Saudede mean? It seems to be quite a common and generally used word?

Also it's interesting that their is no 'community' feeling in NYC...is that quite common with Brazilians abroad? Is there much the same rivalry when abroad as when in Brazil?

Also what are the main character differences between women from Rio and Sao Paulo?

Does anyone have any anecdotes or humorous tales of Brazilian people and their character? For example someone once wrote 'she had an elegant way of moving her hips when she walked, you could tell she was from Rio'!

Thanks!

Maverick..

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Mo

Total Posts: 20 | Joined Jan. 2003 | Posted on: 8:03 am on Jan. 7, 2003 | IP
randy828


Newbie
   
Saudades - very special word.  I guess translation in english would be "longing".   For example, I have a longing for seeing my Brazilian girlfriend since she has returned to Sao Paulo.   I think "longing" is not as descriptive or strong enough emotion word but you should get an understanding of what "Saudades" means.

It is such a beautiful word that we should never even try to translate it to english!

(Edited by randy828 at 6:04 am on Jan. 7, 2003)

Total Posts: 14 | Joined Dec. 2002 | Posted on: 9:43 am on Jan. 7, 2003 | IP
maverickpix


Newbie
   

Hey Randy, thanxs for your reply to the meaning of  'Saudade' interesting! What about character differences between Rio and Sao Paulo women? Can you help on that?

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Mo

Total Posts: 20 | Joined Jan. 2003 | Posted on: 9:48 am on Jan. 7, 2003 | IP
randy828


Newbie
   
I wish I could...I have only personally met one brasiliera from Recife (although she has lived in Sao Paulo for most of her life).  She is amazing...stunningly beautiful, olive skin, dark eyes and hair, beautiful body!  She is very independent, college educated and continuing, she was an excellent professional, strong-willed, confrontational (but in a good way..if something was the matter, she wanted it fixed).  Away from work she was very sensitive (surprised me after only knowing her at work), funny, intelligent, and a little crazy.  Very sexy and seductive.  She is strong in English and Spanish, which encouraged me to start learning Portuguese!  

I admit, she is the most amazing woman I have ever met in my life.  We continue our strong relationship even though we no longer work together and she lives in Sao Paulo and I am in the United States.

Sorry I can not help you more, I am sure there are some guys and girls here in this forum that could help you better.  Good luck!

Total Posts: 14 | Joined Dec. 2002 | Posted on: 12:11 pm on Jan. 7, 2003 | IP
castanha


Newbie
   
saudade is a bittersweet, almost unquenchable longing

Total Posts: 12 | Joined Jan. 2003 | Posted on: 2:12 pm on Jan. 7, 2003 | IP
Ze


Junior Member
   
We, here in Rio, tend to regard paulistas as tight assed, obnoxious, wannabe yupies (this is the extreme stereotype). My personal point of view is that they are scoundrels all of them and must be eliminated by our righteous virtue.

Total Posts: 93 | Joined Jan. 2003 | Posted on: 4:50 pm on Jan. 7, 2003 | IP
maverickpix


Newbie
   

Randy, thanks for your reply...I know what you mean about how beautiful and sultry Brazilian women are...I guess it's their mixed cultural heritage that gives them this look!

Castanha, thanks for your translation of Saudade, are you Brazilian? can you offer any more insight into the culture?

Ze, wow..that's a pretty extreme description of Paulistas....I'm sure a number of them will have one or two things to say about Cariocas!! Did you by any chance date someone from Sao Paulo to have such bitterness towards them?

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Mo

Total Posts: 20 | Joined Jan. 2003 | Posted on: 3:49 am on Jan. 8, 2003 | IP
Ze


Junior Member
   
I'm just waiting for one of them to catch the bait, and then show you a genuine war between Paulistas and Cariocas.

Total Posts: 93 | Joined Jan. 2003 | Posted on: 5:23 am on Jan. 8, 2003 | IP
maverickpix


Newbie
   
Ze, You are da man! Let's see if anyone catches the bait, it would be very insightful, intriguing and educational to see a war of words between Paulistas and Cariocas!

Later,

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Mo

Total Posts: 20 | Joined Jan. 2003 | Posted on: 6:18 am on Jan. 8, 2003 | IP
castanha


Newbie
   
OK, here's some more...Saudade=yearning so intense for those who are missing, or for vanished times or places, that their absence is the most profound presence in one's life... state of being, rather than merely a sentiment

i think that's more accurate

Total Posts: 12 | Joined Jan. 2003 | Posted on: 1:08 pm on Jan. 8, 2003 | IP
randy828


Newbie
   
Great job Castanha!  Much better wording than me..I think I am brain dead from giving training for the last few days....

Total Posts: 14 | Joined Dec. 2002 | Posted on: 1:36 pm on Jan. 8, 2003 | IP
Lucas


Newbie
   

Quote: from Ze on 11:23 am on Jan. 8, 2003
I'm just waiting for one of them to catch the bait, and then show you a genuine war between Paulistas and Cariocas.


É melhor arranjar uma banquinho...

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Lucas, um usuário convicto (mas não fanático) de Macintosh

Total Posts: 39 | Joined Dec. 2002 | Posted on: 1:49 pm on Jan. 8, 2003 | IP
fernandobn


Junior Member
   
Paulistas when go to the beach they wear high hills and makeup, he, he, he. Cariocas are more charming, graceful. Ahrr! The text you mentioned is from the song Girl from Ipanema written by Tom Jobim.

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Fernando B.

Total Posts: 55 | Joined Dec. 2002 | Posted on: 4:09 pm on Jan. 8, 2003 | IP
maverickpix


Newbie
   

way to go Castanha! you hit the nail on the head! Ze, not one's really caught the bait? How long does one need to fish?

Fernando, that's funny...you must be a Carioca! I just had a friend return from Rio, he was there for New Year and his first visit...he said it's more beautiful than Heaven! The women are the best he's ever seen...

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Mo

Total Posts: 20 | Joined Jan. 2003 | Posted on: 9:38 am on Jan. 9, 2003 | IP
fernandobn


Junior Member
   
Yes, I am a true Carioca born in Guanabara state now Rio de janeiro state. I want to say that Paulista women are wonderful too! But.... Paulistas used to say that cariocas do not work, because of the beach! This isn't the true, we do work! I think we are more relaxed, laid back than Paulista people. It is hard to put a suit and get into a bus (with air conditioning of course) to downtown Rio that passes by the beach, and you ask yourself...What the heck I am doing here!  So, before you go work go to a quick swim, and you gonna be ok all day! refreshing! I think that Paulistas are jealous about that. In other hand they have more money to spend! he, he, he. We use to say that Paulistas swim, swim, swim and never get to the beach.

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Fernando B.

Total Posts: 55 | Joined Dec. 2002 | Posted on: 11:08 am on Jan. 9, 2003 | IP
maverickpix


Newbie
   
Hey Fernando, Thanks for your reply...interesting what you say about difference between Cariocas and paulistas and that Cariocas are more laid back..I think it is almost the same as the difference between Californians and New Yorkers...it seems which ever city is by the sea with the warmer weather will generally be more laid back and easy going. New Yorkers are tough, aggressive and hard workers where in Calfifornia they just cruise,surf and have fun!...oh and plenty of plastic!

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Mo

Total Posts: 20 | Joined Jan. 2003 | Posted on: 11:40 am on Jan. 9, 2003 | IP
Guest



Anonymous
   
Why are carioca women considered more beautiful than women in other parts of Brazil??? it seems that this is said mostly by Americans. I don't think I'm being cynical when I assume that it's because they wear the fewest clothes. Are women in SP, Curitiba, Brasilia, Minas Gerais, Amazonas, etc. less beautiful? Or are they too prim (fully clothed) for the masses of wannabe sex tourists that visit Brazil? Really, sometimes I think what passes for an interest in Brazilian culture is really just jungle fever with a samba beat!

Total Posts: 211 | Joined Dec. 2002 | Posted on: 1:31 pm on Jan. 9, 2003 | IP
fernandobn


Junior Member
   
you are welcome, yep I think that is exactly as you said. Brazilian Southern people use to say that baianos (people born in Bahia state) are lazy, is too hot to do anything, if you go to restaurants, be prepared to wait long time for your order. Baianas refer to anybody as Meu Rei (My King) with that lazzy accent. Obviously this is a Stereotype.  Mineiros do everything in secrecy we use to say, he, he and they say that we Cariocas are easy going, frisky.

Guest:
In other parts of Brazil, they are beautiful too! In Rio grande do sul women are so beautiful like brunette with blue/green eyes and white skin, maybe due to the german/italian heritage. Cariocas in my opinion are charming, gracious, they create fashion style and in all other parts of Brazil follow them. They have "bossa" which translate as style, charm, attitude. The tan skin enhances everything.



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Fernando B.

Total Posts: 55 | Joined Dec. 2002 | Posted on: 5:18 pm on Jan. 9, 2003 | IP
Guest



Anonymous
   
the type of brasileira that American and European men go for, though, is the mulatta (the stereotype of a brazilian). I mean, you don't see sex tourists in in the South! Most Americans just go to Rio and assume that all girls (should) look like Sonia Braga.

So why is it that people in MG do things in secrecy?

Total Posts: 211 | Joined Dec. 2002 | Posted on: 6:09 pm on Jan. 9, 2003 | IP
maverickpix


Newbie
   
Fernando and Guest...Thanks for your inputs..quick question..Guest, when you mentioned Mulatta (stereotype of a Brazilian) What exactly do you mean and does that word mean? How is it used?

Also 'Brasileira' is that a general word for a Brazilian woman? Bacause folks from Rio are Cariocas, Sao Paulo are Paulistas etc.. or is 'Brasileira' for those from the capital Brasilia? Excuse my ignorance but trying to better understand the culture..

It's also funny how from reading a lot of the other subjects in the forums invariably most discussions end up involving men/women/beauty/sex!! Not that I'm complaining...

Regarding stereotypes...I think this applies all over the world...With all due respect Americans do not represent global tourism..only ignorant tourists would assume all there is to Brazil is Rio, Sao Paulo lots of hot women (and men), beach party's and samba! You also have to question how does Brazil and Brazilians abroad promote their culture to foreigners?

How do Brazilians go about changing stereotypes about their culture?

Thanks to those reading and those replying to the forum!

Obrigao!

M.

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Mo

Total Posts: 20 | Joined Jan. 2003 | Posted on: 3:31 am on Jan. 10, 2003 | IP
Guest



Anonymous
   
A mulata is a someone who is of mixed African-European (Portuguese) descent (also African-Spanish in the Spanish-speaking world). That's the idea most Americans have of Brazilians. But Brazil is a melting pot, too! There are lots of Japanese, Middle Eastern, Italian, German, Easter European, etc. immigrants. After slavery was abolished, the government of Brazil encouraged immigration from other parts of the world. My good friend is Chinese-Brazilian (but Brazilians would never use this term, she's just "Brazilian") and she's irritated to no end that people exclaim "But you don't look Brazilian!") when she tells them where her family is from. A coworker of mine is also from Sao Paulo state, his family name is Haddad and he looks like the 23rd hijacker but he's also Brazilian, Americans don't believe that he's Brazilian because he doesn't look mulato (part African). So, when horny American frat boys think of hot Brazilian girls, they're not referring to the ones that, to Americans, look Japanese, Lebanese, etc. What ignorance!

"Brasileira" is portuguese for (female) Brazilian. Males are "brasileiros".

Total Posts: 211 | Joined Dec. 2002 | Posted on: 8:36 am on Jan. 10, 2003 | IP
lalalaza


Newbie
   
Mo,
I am not sure where in the states you are located but there are brazilian communities throughout the states. I personally have lived in Philadelphia for the past 13 years and have seen the tremendous increase of brazilians immigrants just within a 5 mile radius of where I live to include more than 5,000 brazilians. When I first arrived there was a tremendous amount of Curitibanos (people from Curitiba, which is in southern Brasil) and Mineiros (people from Minas Gerais). Now you find all different types of Brazilians represented just in Philadelphia, which has a small community compared to Newark, Boston, Miami and New York. You have the darker skinned nordestinos (people from the north Goianos-people from Goais- and Baianos- people from Bahia and Mineros) and you have the lighter skinned people - mostly from the south.
Besides skin color there are many differences in the way they live and specially in the way they speak. The best way to find out the differences between the different cultures between Brazilians is to just spend time in the communities in the different cities such as the Ironbound section of Newark. There you will find the answer to many of your questions.
Izabelle

Total Posts: 2 | Joined Jan. 2003 | Posted on: 9:15 am on Jan. 10, 2003 | IP
maverickpix


Newbie
   

Lalalaza thanks for your kind reply. Firstly I am not actually from the states and I live in London but travel much to America. But your reply was very helpful.

Anonymous, thanks...So to re-confirm Mulata is not used by Brazilians to describe fellow Brazilians, correct? Only used my Foreigners? or could one say 'you're a cariocas but really a mulata'

It's quite funny actually but it seems outside of every country in the world the largest population of immigrants is in Brazil....Japanese, Lebanese, Germans, Polish even Africans! More black people in Brazil than most African countries from what I gather!

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Mo

Total Posts: 20 | Joined Jan. 2003 | Posted on: 10:46 am on Jan. 10, 2003 | IP
lalalaza


Newbie
   
Mo,
There is also a very large Brazilian community in London right now.  As a matter of fact there are as many brazilians immigrating to the UK as to the states.

Total Posts: 2 | Joined Jan. 2003 | Posted on: 11:12 am on Jan. 10, 2003 | IP
fernandobn


Junior Member
   
Guest thanks for your post
This come from our history: “Inconfidência Mineira” a rebel and secret movement organized by the cult and richest  men of “Minas Gerais” in 1788 against the Portuguese Authorities which imposed a tax of 1.5 ton of gold per year and if not reached this goal, an extra tax would be charged from all Minas Gerais population.

Mo
I would like to say that people from the capital Brasília are known as Brasilienses. Brasileiro(a) are all people from Brazil. Mulatas exists in all over Brazil. It is a Portuguese export product, he, he forgive me my fellow mulatas! just kidding.

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Fernando B.

Total Posts: 55 | Joined Dec. 2002 | Posted on: 11:43 am on Jan. 10, 2003 | IP
maverickpix


Newbie
   

Guys,

Thanks for kind responses!

Mo

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Mo

Total Posts: 20 | Joined Jan. 2003 | Posted on: 5:00 am on Jan. 13, 2003 | IP
Pedro


Newbie
   
Glossary:

mulata: mixed european and african

caboclo: mixed indian and european

cafuzo: mixed african and indian

Attention! For a brazilian, a mulata is not the same as a cabocla. But those names are getting outdated as long as races keep mixing and many brazilians do have european, indian and african heritage.

Total Posts: 17 | Joined Jan. 2003 | Posted on: 8:12 am on Jan. 13, 2003 | IP
USCIT


Newbie
   
Pedro,

What then would be the term for a person with all three blood lines? European, African and Indian mix.

Thank you.  

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USCIT

Total Posts: 21 | Joined Dec. 2002 | Posted on: 11:29 am on Jan. 13, 2003 | IP
fernandobn


Junior Member
   
Confuso (Confused) he, he, he

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Fernando B.

Total Posts: 55 | Joined Dec. 2002 | Posted on: 12:56 pm on Jan. 13, 2003 | IP
BRENT


Newbie
   

Quote: from fernandobn on 12:56 pm on Jan. 13, 2003
Confuso (Confused) he, he, he


Funny shit, Fernando!

Total Posts: 22 | Joined Jan. 2003 | Posted on: 1:36 pm on Jan. 13, 2003 | IP
fernandobn


Junior Member
   
I couldn't help, no mean to hurt anybody, but just a joke, I use to hear from Brazilian comedians since I was a kid.

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Fernando B.

Total Posts: 55 | Joined Dec. 2002 | Posted on: 1:57 pm on Jan. 13, 2003 | IP
Pedro


Newbie
   
To USCIT:

the term for a mixed european + indian + african is BRAZILIAN.

Total Posts: 17 | Joined Jan. 2003 | Posted on: 5:31 am on Jan. 14, 2003 | IP
maverickpix


Newbie
   

You guys are just tooo funny! So I guess this is what you call Brazilian sense of humour?? Actually,How would you describe a Brazilian sense of humour?

Does anyone have any short Brazilian jokes? About themselves and Americans about there heritage? ...Keep feeding me information, it is all educational and appreciated!!

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Mo

Total Posts: 20 | Joined Jan. 2003 | Posted on: 10:53 am on Jan. 14, 2003 | IP
USCIT


Newbie
   
Ah, thank you Pedro. I gather I am to take it from your postings then that a Mulata and a Caboclo and a Cofuzo are not Brazilians, but as stated. The only one correctly termed Brazilian is of the three blood lines.

I had thought perhaps European + African + Indian might be Mameluco, but wasn't certain. Thank you for your courtesy in providing this info.

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USCIT

Total Posts: 21 | Joined Dec. 2002 | Posted on: 12:21 pm on Jan. 14, 2003 | IP
Guest



Anonymous
   
Mameluco is the fruit of white and Indian mixing.

All these names. I propose mamelufuso for the complete salad.

Total Posts: 211 | Joined Dec. 2002 | Posted on: 12:39 pm on Jan. 14, 2003 | IP
Adam


Junior Member
   
I have started reading "Little Brazil," and it is very interesting to me. So far, the author talks about brasilians leaving their country to the states, it explains the who, where, when and why's..even gives true stories of immigration from brasilians(how to evade the "Tia Mata" I think this was the code name for INS). I would reccomend this book to everyone.

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Tchau

Total Posts: 64 | Joined Dec. 2002 | Posted on: 8:45 pm on Jan. 15, 2003 | IP
maverickpix


Newbie
   

Hey Adam,

Wow that ws quick for someone to go out any buy the book 'Little Brazil'. I would love to read it, and I'm glad you are enjoying it...keep the feedback and information coming through...after all it is educational and to the benefit of all those who log into the forum!

Obrigado,

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Mo

Total Posts: 20 | Joined Jan. 2003 | Posted on: 7:00 am on Jan. 16, 2003 | IP
MARQUESEAZY


Junior Member
   
IN AMERICA ALL THESE MULATAS WOULD BE CONSIDERED BLACK BY AMERICAN STANDARDS.AND WHILE I AM ON THE SUBJECT I HAVE TO PUT THIS MYTH TO REST NO BRAZIL DOES NOT HAVE THE LARGEST BLACK POPULATION OUTSIDE OF AFRICA THATS RIDICULOUS.I WOULD SAY THE U.S AND THE CARIBBEAN WOULD FIT THIS DESCRIPTION.IF BRAZIL HAD THAT MANY BLACKS DONT YOU THINK THERE WOULD BE A BLACK PRESIDENT IN BRAZIL.HAITI PROBABLY HAS THE LARGEST BLACK POPULATION OUTSIDE OF AFRICA SINCE ITS THE ONLY BLACK REPUBLIC ON THE HEMISPHERE.BRAZIL'S EUROPEAN IMMIGRANTS WAY OUT NUMBER THE BLACKS.MOST BRAZILIANS ARE DESCENDED OF PORTUGUESE,ITALIANS,LEBANESE,AND JAPANESE BUT VERY FEW ARE DESCENDENTS OF AFRICANS THEY ARE A VERY SMALL MINORITY ONLY 6% OF BRAZILIANS FALL INTO THAT CATEGORYBUT THE OTHER 94% SURE ARENT.

Total Posts: 88 | Joined Jan. 2003 | Posted on: 1:00 am on Jan. 17, 2003 | IP
maverickpix


Newbie
   

Thanks Marqueseazy for your matter of fact information.

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Mo

Total Posts: 20 | Joined Jan. 2003 | Posted on: 4:47 am on Jan. 17, 2003 | IP
Guest



Anonymous
   
Marqueasy you are incorrect in your numbers I use to work for the UN (United Nations/and I was one of many reps with Brazil) and in a few days I will be back with exact numbers given by THE BRAZILIAN GOVERMENT.

Total Posts: 211 | Joined Dec. 2002 | Posted on: 2:15 pm on Jan. 20, 2003 | IP
Guest



Anonymous
   
Also would you please kill the "all caps" in cyber space that's "screaming and or yelling". You also need to do more research. I've read your other comments in other threads where you spew the same MISINFORMATION, and I wish to direct you to the facts, which I am compiling as I type.

You sound more like the Brazilian version of the Klu, Klux, Klan that are huge in America. I know for a fact that Afro-Brazilians (based on your Brazilian government numbers) are at least 40% of Brazil's citizens. If it is a myth then blame your very own goverment. Oh and no matter how many people populate a space, doesn't mean they will be allowed to be represented. The United States of America has made several strides towards racial and economic equality BUT is there a Black president? No or not yet anyways. The higest rankers are Colin Powell and Condelessa Rice and they are both Black. There is no more ONE DROP rule in the USA, that went out with the CIVIL RIGHTS MOVEMENT. Also Haiti doesn't have more people on it's island than the USA has Blacks. Anyways I felt the need after seeing you post such inaccurate information to post, oh I will create a whole new topic with exact numbers given by the Brazilian Government.

To the ORIGINAL POSTER, I apologise for taking your topic into a whole different direction. Please forgive my American ways.

Total Posts: 211 | Joined Dec. 2002 | Posted on: 2:24 pm on Jan. 20, 2003 | IP
 

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