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MARQUESEAZY


Junior Member
   
ALOT OF BRAZILIAN WOMEN ARE NATURALLY BLONDE LIKE XUXA AND CRISTINA FROM UNIVISION IS ALSO A NATURAL BLONDE AND SHE'S FROM CUBA AN ISLAND THATS PREDOMINANTLY BLACK AND MIXED RACE AINT THAT SOMETHING.OFCOURSE NOT ALL HISPANICS LOOK ETHNIC SOME HISPANICS CAN ACTUALLY PASS FOR WHITE LIKE CRISTINA,RICKY MARTIN,CAMERON DIAZ,AND EMILIO ESTEVEZ JUST TO NAME A FEW

Total Posts: 88 | Joined Jan. 2003 | Posted on: 1:19 am on Feb. 20, 2003 | IP
Jeromy


Junior Member
   
I am aware of this. I am specifally referring to dark skinned ones that dye their hair blondes, or those who are not naturally blonde.

Total Posts: 55 | Joined Feb. 2003 | Posted on: 1:24 am on Feb. 20, 2003 | IP
Macunaima


Member
   
Well, as someone who used to dye their hair green and blue, I feel bad about tossing stones at people who dye their hair a ridiculously artificial color.

That said, what bothers me isn't the use of blond so much - which can be quite cool if used in a self-consciously artifical way - but in the presumption that blondness evidently makes beautiful.

The other day, just for a lark and for something to write about, I went looking for brown colored contact lens. Couldn't find them anywhere, even though they're quite common in the States. Found plenty of green and blue ones, however. In the second opticians I went into to, I was attended to by this woman who was "canela skinned" (to use Bori's descriptive) with bleach blond hair and blue-blue eyes. When she heard I was looking for colored lens she became enthusiastic "Oh! You'll love them! Mine are colored. See?" She pulled a chunk of her lens back and beneath, sure enough, she had jaboticaba colored eyes. Then she saw my eye color (blue) and became all flustered. "Er, I don't understand. You mean you want to make your eyes more blue? Or do you want green lenses?"

It took me about 10 minutes of explaining things in one sylable words in order to get her to understand that I really, truly wnated BROWN contact lens. Now, this woman wasn't dumb, but the level of incomprehension reached by her when I said I wanted brown lens was really a sight to behold. It was as if the sky had fallen.

When she left the room to go look through their stock, I took a look at the posters on the wall. One sported a lady who looked just like her - bleach-blond hair and all - with blue eyes. The caption read: "Arrasa com a competição... Naturalmente!" Which means "Wipe out the competition... Naturally!"

All this got me to thinking about MARQUES MULATINHO'S poorly informed rants here on the forum.

See, it seems to me that he's correct in pointing out the racism that permeates Brazilian society. Where he misses the boat is in his ignorance of how things actually work down here. He wants them to follow the ideological model he's picked up from Black Entertainment Tevelvison and they simply don't.

I don't see too many black people trying to be white in Brazil. What I DO see are a minority (but a substantial minority) of cablocos and very light skinned mulatos who are attempting to turn themselves into Xuxa.

This group is the minority, not the majority, as MULATINHO would have it. But what chills me (and Silvia, who studies this kind of stuff) is the way this sort of happens as if it were (to use the poster's words) "natural". "Naturally", if one is blond and blue-eyed, one will do away with the competition, or so these folks would like to believe.

One needs to be really careful when one tries, like MULATINHO, to extend this behavior over all Brazilians, however. To me - and to most Brazilians I know - this is the kind of thing one would see in suburbia. It's our version of the trailer park trash puttin' on the rinestones and the Dixie flags. Suburbia is full of girls like the one I met, not really white or black or indian or anything BUT mestiço. In such a situation, playing to an obvious racial extreme which is blared on T.V. everyday is a great way to make oneself stick out, a bit like Adrianerik said about sensuality. To tell the truth, however, I've seen a minority of girls go the other way, too, and adopt "estilo black" when it's obvious to everyone that they aren't black.

So it seems to me that these kids are - like MARQUES MULATINHO - ashamed of being mestiço.  They get MULATINHO'S message loud and clear: being mestiço ain't shit. They feel that being mestiço gives one no special destinction, especially when one is working class, and attempt to escape the model. Much better, they feel, to flaunt a different style and given that our media system is run by racists, the style which will most likely be flaunted by these T.V. babies who were brought up on Xuxa is blond and blue-eyed. In other words, deep down, most of these kids feel like MULATINHO. They presume that they need to subjectively be something they are objectively not. Most of them are closer in skin toen to "white" than to "black" anyhow, so it's quite easy for the ambient racism to push them in that direction.

Frankly, however, if one ain't from surburbia, if one is middle-class, wealthy or from the favela, this kind of behavior simply reeks of the (take your pick) the hoi polloi or of a people with no self pride. Everyone I hang around with (from both extremes) just clicks their tongues at it.

I find it to be sad, however.

-----
Brazil is the country of the future and always will be!

Total Posts: 147 | Joined Jan. 2003 | Posted on: 5:29 am on Feb. 20, 2003 | IP
Pedro


Newbie
   
Why do most people consider ridiculous that a dark skinned one dyes her hair blonde, but there´s nothing wrong that a light skinned dyes her hair black?

For instance, Carmen Miranda was a nature blonde. Did you know that? But probably no american never saw the original colour of her hair (except her husband, maybe).


Total Posts: 17 | Joined Jan. 2003 | Posted on: 5:58 am on Feb. 20, 2003 | IP
 

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