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krista



Junior Member
   
1) I am currently preparing to take on a research project dealing with African influences on Brasilian music; or more precisely - the influences or traces of African ritual music in Brasil/Brasilian music. (african ritual music here would more or less equal candomble, macumba and umbanda rituals/music)
HOWEVER, my work should be a LOT more narrowed down than that. I'm scared. I have no idea what topic I should pick, what will work, what will not work... I've been thinking of tracing African rhythms in Maracatu music perhaps... but perhaps someone here has even a better suggestion?
Or even better - does anyone know any good books/websites that actually deal with the musical side of Afro-Brasilian music? There's too much of this anthropology/sociology/etc around, and almost no detailed analysis of the music itself... If I have some sources of information,I can easily make my own topic; but right now I can't even find anything... Help... anything will be good...

2) I'm planning to move to Rio for the summer (umm...or what we like to call summer here on the north pole). Been looking for a nice small, somewhat equipped apartment (well, i can't really bring my own bed and my own fridge...). The rates published on the internet are mostly for North American tourists, and I as a poor eastern european will definitely not pay $600 a month for a place. Anybody know anything cheaper? Where should I look?
I have been reading the O Globo classifieds lately, and I find quite a bit of stuff there for R$300-800.. Is that per month? (i take nothing for granted). Should I consider getting someting thru O Globo section? What does "cozinha kit." mean?
Ahh...soo many questions. Any help welcome. I will not pay more than R$900 for anything... (you know, I need to eat too...even though it seems to be fashionable among girls of my age to be on a constant diet...)
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ps: if anyone actually gives me some USEFUL help on either topic, i promise i'll put a thank-you note for you in the beginning of my research paper.

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Radio Do Mar: http://www.live365.com/stations/226288

Total Posts: 97 | Joined Jan. 2003 | Posted on: 11:14 pm on Feb. 12, 2003 | IP
Adam


Junior Member
   
"cozinha kit". ...cozinha means kitchen, I dont know why theres an extra "kit." there. Something else you might see is "cozinha cabe fogão, quatro bocas," which means kitchen fits stove, four mouths.

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Tchau

Total Posts: 64 | Joined Dec. 2002 | Posted on: 12:57 am on Feb. 13, 2003 | IP
Macunaima


Member
   
Krista,

The logical place for you to start would be to read Rogério Basitde's book on African influences in Brazil. It's title, unfortunately, escapes me now. I think you'll find that the African influences are very wide and that there're few direct "left-overs" from the colonial period in stuff like maracatu.

Hernan Vianna's books on Samba and Funk would also be obligatory reading and there are many interesing thesis deposited at my universit which should at least point you in the right direction as to bibliography. Universidade Cândido Mendes has a good selection of stuff at the Centro Afro-Asiatico, too.

As for housing, we will very probably have a room available in our apartment in Santa Teresa by then. The room is small, but the apê itself is wonderful, with a great view of the bay. We're talking something on the order of 300 reais rent, including utilities, which should run toa round another 50 or so.

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Brazil is the country of the future and always will be!

Total Posts: 147 | Joined Jan. 2003 | Posted on: 3:47 am on Feb. 13, 2003 | IP
krista



Junior Member
   
all those books you named - do any of them deal with the actual musical details though? I already have a pile of books treating the African influence in the general sense, and they're not doing much good right now. My stuck-point is finding reliable musical examples to analyze (I don't trust myself enough to juss pick up a random Brasilian CD and label something as "the african thing" on it...). But I'll definitely check out UCAM. Tell me this - if I actually choose to contact someone at one of the universities in Brasil, is there any chance that I can deal with them in English? (my portu isn't all so good that I could comfortably discuss ethnomusicology with anybody)
...and...there's a good chance that some day soon I may ask you more about the room you have there...

People around BOSTON area - Does anybody know of any active candomble priests around the area? Or anybody who knows the songs or the drumming patterns of different candomble rituals... I mean, someone who'd be willing to talk to me. I've found people who can tell me very well which dance movements go with each rhythm in candomble tradition, but I'm a bit stuck in my search for  drummers and foresingers...

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Radio Do Mar: http://www.live365.com/stations/226288

Total Posts: 97 | Joined Jan. 2003 | Posted on: 6:51 am on Feb. 13, 2003 | IP
fernandobn


Junior Member
   
Krista check this out
http://www.bangadrum.com/Merchant2/merchant.mv?Screen=CTGY&Store_Code=bad&Category_Code=brazillib

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Fernando B.

Total Posts: 55 | Joined Dec. 2002 | Posted on: 10:05 am on Feb. 13, 2003 | IP
Macunaima


Member
   
A good person for you to talk to at my deptarment at the Museu would be Prof. Gilberto Velho. He does speak english.

Also, in the States try Anthony Seeger.

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Brazil is the country of the future and always will be!

Total Posts: 147 | Joined Jan. 2003 | Posted on: 2:33 pm on Feb. 13, 2003 | IP
krista



Junior Member
   
ahh...thank you so much.
However, it looks like my big plans will not come to life... I just thought that I had a nice topic in my mind, and then I talked to my drumming teacher (she's about to get her PhD in ethnomusicology from Brown), and she told me that I'm too ambitious and trying to do something that she hasn't even dared to think of yet (oh..I basically wanted to trace some african ritual-drumming rhythms and patterns thru time and see what has become of them now, where in Brasil can they be found and how have they transformed. But I guess she's right - that kind of research would take direct contact with lots of primary resources both in Africa and Brasil + several years of work; especially because no works on this topic have been published yet). But anyway...I'll just make up some really general topic then, and see where it takes me...
Fortunately, I found a really cool Brasilian guy in Boston who runs the local Brasilian cultural center, teaches capoeira, samba drumming and probably knows a lot about everything. So, as soon as I meet him again, I'll bug him for some help...
Ahh...music is so much fun. :D


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Radio Do Mar: http://www.live365.com/stations/226288

Total Posts: 97 | Joined Jan. 2003 | Posted on: 6:13 pm on Feb. 13, 2003 | IP
krista



Junior Member
   
by the way...
according to UCLA Anthony Seeger deals with music of Brasilian indians, and according to UFRJ Prof. Gilberto Velho deals with anthropology, but not with music (you see, that's my problem - I'm trying to do some detailed analysis of specific musical examples, but apparently this has not been done much in the past...)
But I'll just use whatever the local Brasilian artists in Boston area know and hope this will be enough for now (after all, i'm still a firstyear...got enuff time do take on some bigger plans)
thus, I consider case closed.

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Radio Do Mar: http://www.live365.com/stations/226288

Total Posts: 97 | Joined Jan. 2003 | Posted on: 9:45 pm on Feb. 13, 2003 | IP
Macunaima


Member
   
Yes, however as an ethnomusicologist specializing in Brazil, you canb et yer booties that Seeger will have a preety good idea of where you can start and who to talk to.

As for Gilberto... The man has orientated practically everyone who's done urban ethnomusicological work in Brazil in the last 20 years. He's Vianna's orientator. Again, though he might not be able to tell you what you want, he cartainly knows who will.

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Brazil is the country of the future and always will be!

Total Posts: 147 | Joined Jan. 2003 | Posted on: 3:43 am on Feb. 14, 2003 | IP
 

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