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Adam
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11/08/2002
16:11:15
Subject: Brazil-by John Updike
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It is about 2 cariocas from Rio and their adventures in Sao
Paulo, Matto Grosso, and Brasilia. One is a upper class light
skinned woman, and the other a poor dark skinned man. I
highly recomend this book for those who wish to learn a little
about racial inequality in brasil a few decades back.


diggsy
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11/08/2002
18:54:42
RE: Brazil-by John Updike
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I second that, Adam. I read it a few months ago and couldn't put it down. I think Updike went for a timeless setting that tried to stretch across a symbolic history of this great country that I am just now starting to study and experience. The scenes in the Rio favelas [shantytowns] were very memorable and poignent, and of course the scenes in the Amazon were steamy and exotic like we imagine the Amazon is. I wanted more though. I was unsatisfied at the end. And the fantastical plot twist 2/3rds through just didn't do it for me. I second the recommendation though. I 'm glad you posted it. And this leads me to an open question for all:

Do you know any other good books [fiction or non] that intimate the mysteries of Brazil?

I just finished reading Joseph Pages "The Brazilian" and enjoyed thoroughly.



USCIT
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11/09/2002
10:39:25
RE: Brazil-by John Updike
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Diggsy, unable to find any reference to a book titled 'The Brazilian' by a Joseph Pages. Is it just published? By whom if I may ask?

Some of the works of Marcio Souza have been translated into English. Those that I know about, if you want further reading are listed below.

Done by a Brazilian about Brazil. Albeit kind of tongue in cheek sometimes. His first book was "Emperor of the Amazon" (1980 -U.S. date or date of translation) "Mad Maria" (1983) "The Order of the Day" (1986) "Lost World II" (1990) "Death Squeeze" (1992) and as editor of a non-fiction book "The Book Of Days" (1993). To just name a few.

All good books. Worth reading. Main point being, if a person is seriously trying to look into Brazil and the culture, reading books written by Brazilian authors and watching the innuendoes, the jokes and subtleties as well as the main story line, often gives a better degree of insight as to what is culturally accepted in Brazil than something written by a person from the U.S. or other country.

Perhaps a Brazilian will give a viewpoint on how Marcio Souza's works are viewed in Brazil.


diggsy
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11/09/2002
11:44:18
RE: Brazil-by John Updike
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Hey Adam,

Never heard of Sousa before, but will definitely check him out.

My apologies. The name of the book is "The Brazilians" and the author is Joseph Page, an American law professor with a passion for Brazil. Yeah, it's written by a gringo, but still worth the read. I'm curious if there's anyone else out there that has read it and has any thoughts on it.


Another One
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12/24/2002
15:51:39
RE: Brazil-by John Updike
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Another good book is a how-to called Ventriliquism for
Dummies


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