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mike
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9/28/2002
19:45:57
Subject: citizenship/residency
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Hello,

Does anyone know how long it takes for an american to get brazilian residency after he has married a brazilian.In the united states it is 5 years for residency and 10 for citizenship.What is it in brazil.Maybe 1 year for residency and 2 for citizenship???Please help....


Take Five
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9/28/2002
21:19:10
RE: citizenship/residency
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This information was found in an Australia website:

http://brazil.org.au/english/eng02.htm

It seems the time you have to wait is a mere one year.

BRAZILIAN CITIZENSHIP THROUGH NATURALIZATION

APPLICATIONS FOR BRAZILIAN CITIZENSHIP THROUGH NATURALIZATION CAN ONLY BE LODGED IN BRAZIL. APPLICATION STANDARDS ARE SET FORTH BY PORTARIA (ORDNANCE) OF THE MINISTER OF JUSTICE NO. 703 OF JUNE 13TH, 1995, PUBLISHED BY DIÁRIO OFICIAL DA UNIÃO (THE BRAZILIAN FEDERAL GOVERNMENT OFFICIAL DAILY) OF JUNE 14TH, 1995.

NATURALIZATION OF FOREIGN CITIZENS IN GENERAL

According to the Constitution of the Federative Republic of Brazil (art. 12, II, a), naturalized Brazilians are those who, as set forth by law (Law no. 6815, of August 9, 1980, as amended by Law no. 6964, of December 9, 1981, and Decree 86715, of December 10, 1981), acquire Brazilian nationality.

CONDITIONS OF NATURALIZATION.

Applicants must meet the following conditions:

A Legal capacity, according to Brazilian law.

B Registration as a permanent resident of Brazil.

C Proof of uninterrupted residence in Brazil for at least
four years immediately prior to lodging the application.

D Ability to read and write Portuguese in a manner
commensurate with his or her possibilities.

E Exercise of a profession or own sufficient property for
support of self and family. This condition is met if the
applicant:

(a) receives a pension for work done in Brazil, or

(b) is a student up to the age of 25, or

(c) is married to a Brazilian citizen, or

(d) shows proof of support by a parent, relative or
descendant who has enough resources to meet the legal
requirement's for the applicant's support.

F Proof of good behavior.

G Absence of any denunciation, indictment or sentence in
Brazil for a crime punishable, in principle, by more than
one year in prison.

H No income tax debits in Brazil.

I Good health. (No proof of good health is required from a
foreigner who has continuously resided in Brazil for more
than two years immediately prior to the date the application
is lodged. See "reduced period of residence" below.






--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

ABSENCES FROM BRAZIL

The required four year period of residence is not considered interrupted by trips abroad, provided that the motive for such trip is considered relevant by the Minister of Justice and that the total sum of the periods of absence from Brazil does not exceed eighteen months.

REDUCED PERIOD OF RESIDENCE

The required four-year period of residence may be shortened to, if the applicant:



1 One year: has a Brazilian child or is married to a
Brazilian.

2 One year: has a Brazilian parent;

3 One year: has rendered or is in a position to
render relevant services to Brazil, at
the discretion of the Minister of
Justice.

4 Two years: is eligible because of professional,
scientific or artistic ability.

5 Three years: owns property of expressive value in
Brazil; is an industrialist, owning
expressive resources; or owns expressive
paid-in shares in any corporation
specially and permanently active in
industry or agriculture.



--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

SPECIAL CASES OF NATURALIZATION

CITIZENS FROM PORTUGUESE-SPEAKING COUNTRIES

According to the Constitution of the Federative Republic of Brazil (art. 12, II, a), citizens from Portuguese-speaking countries may obtain Brazilian citizenship by residing in Brazil for one uninterrupted year and having moral integrity.

FOREIGN CITIZENS RESIDING IN BRAZIL FOR OVER FIFTEEN YEARS

According to the Constitution of the Federative Republic of Brazil (art. 12, II, b), foreign nationals with no criminal conviction residing in Brazil for over fifteen uninterrupted years may have the Brazilian citizenship if they so request. No other conditions are required.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION ON NATURALIZATION PROCEDURES CAN BE OBTAINED IN BRAZIL AT ANY FEDERAL POLICE PRECINCT.

This information page is valid as of 04/03/99 and replaces all previous ones.






Boris
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9/29/2002
04:06:13
RE: citizenship/residency
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Beware, owning Real Estate in Brazil doesn't qualify one for residency nor for any type of visa.

www.lifestylesbrazil.com


mike
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9/29/2002
21:59:16
RE: citizenship/residency
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Does anyone know if I married a brazil girl and left her down there for the year would I still get the residency even if I was in the U.S for the year period(I would take a couple trips down in that year).Your comments are greatly appreciated!!!


brazzaboy
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10/01/2002
18:13:26
RE: citizenship/residency
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Thanks. I had basically asked for this information several months ago, but got scoffed at big time by a bunch of flamers. I have a great love for Brasil and it is about time the great people of Brasil accepted that foreigners can actually love your country too.

Thanks again. I hope to one day relocate permanently to a country I truly want to call home.



John Miller
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10/07/2002
11:46:40
RE: citizenship/residency
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The following are the informal requirements of citizenship in Brasil:
1) An ability samba
2) Party hard till sun up
3) Torcidor de Flamengo!
4) Consume 3-4 plates of feijoada
5) Know the bus numbers in Rio which will take you from Rio Branco via Vidigal to Barra de Tijuca to see your girl/boyfriend for R$1.20.
6) Which Posto to hang out to fumar maconha gratis.
7) Understand the full application of a "jeitinho brasileiro" when and where.
8) Know the full meaning of the words "simpatico and saudades".

Please no flaming, this was all tongue in cheek and much love and respect for Brasil its culture and its wonderful people.




eurokid
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10/07/2002
12:43:02
RE: citizenship/residency
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Sounds like a great idea, although im not a great dancer!!!


JD
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11/13/2002
14:51:45
RE: citizenship/residency
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I would also be interested in knowing if anyone has an answer to Mike's question, i.e. if the spouse's residence in Brazil counts as the one year residency. i'm in the same situation-- my husband will be in Brazil but I will only be able to stay down for a month or so at a time due to my job. any answers out there?
thanks for all this info!


informed
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11/14/2002
16:46:56
RE: citizenship/residency
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1. If you are an American citizen only at any time in your life, you cannot later become a citizen of another country without renouncing your American citizenship.

2. Permanent Residency (Visa no longer required)in Brazil is available to anyone married to a Bazilian or the parent (on the birth certtificate)of a Br. child.
Bonus: if you are a criminal, fleeing justice and the parent of a Br. child Brazil will not respect the extradition laws of the rest of the world, you can stay !!!

3. From my experience, if you choose to try and become a permanent resident I would suggest that you begin the application process through a Brazilian Consulate in the USA or even through their web page.
I ended up having to hire a lawyer, the Federal Police required it, I later learned that this was never neccessary, but the police would not follow the law, and of course the lawyers never informed me of the truth either.
If you have the unfortunate experience of hiring a lawyer you may learn as I (and many others I have communicated with) that the lawyers incentive will be to get as much money out of you as possible. Possibly a required trait to be a lawyer worldwide.
Unfortunately, according to my 5 year experience (I finally gave up)the process can be very slow. In fact the American Consulate in Rio, informed me (A brazilian woman)that it is not unusual for this process to take 10 years!

Good Luck.


Al
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11/26/2002
13:50:09
cpf
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Does anyone know how an American citizen with a tourist visa can get a cpf?


Boris
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11/26/2002
15:51:14
RE: citizenship/residency
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You will have to file an application with a branch of Banco do Brasil, obtain an Attestado that states the names of both of your parents (in the US Consulate), and finally visit an office of the Receita Federal to complete the process and get your CPF number.

... and you will need a permanent address in Brazil to where you CPF card should be sent. Once you have a CPF you would have to regularize it each year by filing either an income tax return or a waiver.


Down to earth
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11/27/2002
07:38:33
RE: citizenship/residency
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I would add a few things to “John Miller’s” list:

9) You must know what “ficar” means or you will be in big trouble
10) You must be able to ignore the violence, the homeless children and poverty around you and just get on with your playboy lifestyle
11) You must have blond hair and blue eyes but spare a black wig and get a tan to wander the streets or Brazilians will take your foreigner looks for a “mug-me” sign
12) You must know the Brazilian dress code if you don’t want to stand out as a gringo: blue jeans with tucked-in polo shirt and out-of-date trainers for men and 2 sizes-too-small jeans and crop top for women. If you are not very comfortable with that, just going around half-naked will do the job.
13) If you speak English, you must have an American accent
14) Poor people are not allowed in Brazil, we’ve got plenty already.
15) You must have at least 2 different diplomas or degrees regardless of where and how you got them. This is not so much to do with getting a job as it is to allow you to brag about your background.
16) Bring all that “Made in Taiwan junk” with you to impress the local folks cos in Brazil we like our imported stuff
17) Bring a year’s supply of condoms with you given that even if Brazil is one of the world’s biggest rubber exporters, condoms are a luxury and those who can afford them cannot always trust the quality. We’ve got enough babies and diseases as it is, don’t want any of yours, thanks.




Guest


11/27/2002
08:25:45
RE: citizenship/residency
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You've got some pretty nasty things well written there, can't say you're wrong, sadly.


Down to earth
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11/27/2002
08:44:57
RE: citizenship/residency
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I'll tell you Ze... I really wish I was wrong!


:o(



Guest


11/27/2002
12:01:15
RE: citizenship/residency
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By the way, nice work on the graveyard, you've added some very serious and lacking points on this forum. Points that I lack the heart to expose, but nonetheless the truth (I may disagree with some of the numbers, but just superficially).


Patinho
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11/27/2002
15:35:21
RE: citizenship/residency
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To John Miller and Down to Earth:

Where was your list 5 years ago when I needed it?

Had to learn what "ficar" meant the hard way... actually still recovering from it.

Those are good lists, I'd like to see more or maybe a new post combining them.... "The American's Guide to Brazil". Could be fuuny.


Tell
Guest


11/27/2002
16:10:53
RE: citizenship/residency
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OK, it seems everybody knows what "ficar" means. Who is going to give a clue to all of us out of the loop who have no idea what it means.
Pretty please


Patinho
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11/27/2002
20:05:36
RE: citizenship/residency
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Message:
the verb literally means "to stay"

When you "ficar" with someone, you "stay" with them.

From my understanding, it just means to have a good time with someone (kissing, hugging,etc) for an extremely short amount of time, and not looking for a long term relationship.

Both players involved know that it is just a "one night stand" even though there might be no sex involved. The next day, the 2 might act as if nothing at all happened.

In Lamen's terms... just hooking up for one night.
Maybe the next day the 2 will hook up again, maybe not.
This is very common in Brazil... more so than in the U.S. anyway.

I hope I was clear and did not repeat myself too much.


brazzaboy
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11/28/2002
02:37:00
RE: citizenship/residency
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Question for informed guest.
#2 in your list marriage to a Brasileira or father a Brasilian child. Is that automatic residency or do you have to wait 2, 3, 5 years for paperwork to be processed? Thanks


informed
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12/01/2002
11:58:58
RE: citizenship/residency
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You obviously have to wait for the paperwork to be completed to claim or prove you have permanent resisdency.
As I understand it, the fact that you are a parent of a Brazilian child automatically gives you the right to apply for and receive the authorization.



Elvis
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12/05/2002
01:24:13
RE: citizenship/residency
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Hello im an Australian citizen, and my girlfriend is also an Australian citizen, if she gives birth to a child in Brazil, does this mean the child is a Brazilian Citizen, and does this mean that myself ( the Australian father ) and my girlfriend ( the Australian mother )can apply under Brazilian LAW , and must be given a Brazilian Perment Residency Document if we request this statues.( none of us have brazilian citizenship or any type of residency document, we will only have a tourist VISA.


Patinho
Guest


12/05/2002
04:16:48
RE: citizenship/residency
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That's the rule in America... I know that. But Brazil I don't know.... it's a damn good idea though.


Mark
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12/07/2002
12:54:51
RE: citizenship/residency
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"The rule in America"???
What rule?


If any American citizen applies to be a resident of another country the children have nothing to do with it, from the perspective of American law. In America, residency has importance primarily for tax reasons, governed by the state, not the Federal government. Where the children were born or reside has nothing to do with American residency of the parents, there is no "American rule" that couples these two issues. American state residency has nothing to do with the childrens residency. American law that governs your American /State residency differs from state to state.

Do not confuse citizenship with residency.

Yes, the Australians would have the right to apply for (and should be granted residency) permanent residency in Br. based on the fact that their child is a Brazilian & Australian citizen.
This is governed by Br. Law unless Australia has a law specifically preventing Australian residents from acquiring Br. residency (which I doubt).


Patinho
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12/07/2002
23:23:05
RE: citizenship/residency
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I will attempt to educate you, Mark. When I made the comment "that's the rule in America", first of all, this is what is considered "slang". This is sometimes a generic, or more common way to say even more common phrases. They can be used to emphisize tone, emotion, or even convey quickness in speech. Do I think you are Brazilian? No... but obviously you just don't get the point.

What I particularly had in mind when refering to the "rule" was the hundreds of "border jumping" pregnant Mexican mothers who manage to sneak across the border and birth their child here. By right of birth, that child is an American citizen, and the parents can recieve residency.

I know what you are going to say. That I still am not distinguishing the difference between citizenship and residency. No I am not. Why? Because I don't care. I assume, and as always could be wrong, that what "Elvis", the Austalian poster that began this conversation, wanted is only looking for a way in which to permanently reside in Brazil, as am I.

So... before you go attacking someone for their choice in words to relay a simple thought, think again exactly what that person meant by it in the first place. Thankyou.


informed / Mark
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12/08/2002
07:06:59
RE: citizenship/residency
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Attacking you???!!!
I asked a question because I was unaware of any rule.
You are extremely sensitive (not to mention condescending and rude).

1. I was unaware that a foreigner could illegaly enter America, give birth to a child and the parents were automatically given American citizenship with the right of resisdency from the American Government. What a contrary attitude to the rule of law!

2. You wrote that you "do not care" about the residency vs. citizenship clarification. Well that is exactly the point of the Australians question. Why the hell are you responding to a post if you do not care about the posters question?

3. You state that you assume that "Adam" wants to live in Brazil permanently "as you do". Based on what? There is not anything in his post to support this assuption. Merely because he asked a question does not indicate anything but a desire for knowledge. Nothing more.

You might consider in the future not being such a prick, if you can help.
Your welcome.


Adam
Guest


12/08/2002
09:12:30
RE: citizenship/residency
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Message:
Mark, I think you mean "Elvis," not me...but come to think
of it, I prob would move there some day, b4 I do that, I have
countless other places to go..Anyways, about you and
Patinhos argument, when ppl write down words (and Im
sure you know this), its hard to understand exactly what
they are trying to say. This seems to be the case. Basically,
it got out of hand. Squash it.


USCIT
Guest


12/08/2002
15:05:59
RE: citizenship/residency
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Words. The little things we communicate with.

I shall go to town.

I will go to town.

Is there a difference? Do you know what it might be, and why?

Using the proper word is important in conveying an idea or thought. It is quite difficult to convey intent or emotion via the written word. That is why people who are very good at it are sometimes highly paid. Writers. They know just which words (or phrase) to choose to develop an emotion, or show their intent should it be other than just listing statistics.

Therefore Patinho, if you wish to truly convey your thoughts, perhaps you could look a little more closely at your word choice.

Mark, I took your comments as casual, not denigrating or insulting. But, the feeling evidently didn't come across to all.

E-mail is especially bad for this. (Forum entries) Words are written, but do they represent the writers 'intent'? Feelings, emotions and all of that.

In the example above:

I shall go to town. [I am compelled to go to town due to an outside influence not of my own choosing.]

I will go to town. [I have a desire to go to town for a reason that IS of my own choosing.]

Simple, but a definite difference.

English 99 1/2. As near as the closest dictionary.

PS. An illegal giving birth in the U.S. is not 'automatically' given citizenship, but they are eligible to apply for the proper papers and it is nearly always granted. However, in case of non-marriage, as Elvis originally asked about for Brazil, it would be much more difficult for the father to make any claims. With DNA testing and etc., I'm sure it would be possible, but not nearly as easily obtained as a properly recorded birth event for the mother.


Patinho
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12/08/2002
15:44:46
RE: citizenship/residency
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I apologize if my tone came off as rash, while this was my intent, it was only in response to your (Mark) post that came off the same to me. Perhaps I am being over sensitive.

The reason? It seems that you outright denied certain facts that I know are true.

Just another example that has nothing to do with Brazil. My brother-in-law has American parents, he, for all purposes, is American. However, since his parents were in Japan at the time of his birth, he is first considered a Japanese citizen. By himself, his parents, and the American Government. Of course, because of his parents' nationality, they applied for, and recieved his American citizenship.

The only other way (to my knowledge) a person can be born an American citizen in a foreign country is to be born on American soil in that country... a Consulate, Military Hospital, etc...

As I said with my original response "That's the rule in America, but Brazil, I don't know."

Once again, I apologize to Mark, for my rude response.


Hugo
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1/02/2003
19:24:14
RE: citizenship/residency
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In reply to Elvis.

A child born in Brazil, whether one of the parents is Brazilian or not, is Brazilian under Article 12 (1) of the Brazilian Constitution 1988. Your scheme might work. solicitor@fastmail.fm


Tore
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1/03/2003
05:13:47
RE: citizenship/residency
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One possible way to gain permanent visa in Brasil is to invest in a business with a minimum investment of US $ 200.000.-

I am able to offer such an opportunity in connection with my SEAWAY PROJECT which basically entails establishing a passenger service by modern catamaran between the towns of Rio de Janeiro - Angra dos Reis - Paraty - Ubatuba and Ilhabela/Sao Sebastiao.

For full details, use this web site:
http://www.yachtmarine.com/seaway/


Macunaima
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1/03/2003
10:40:18
RE: citizenship/residency
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It is a widely held myth that the U.S. doesn't accept dual citizenship. Apparently, they do.

According to the U.S. Consulate in Rio and São Paulo, the U.S. has accepted dual citizenship with Brazil since 1998. As long as one does not officially renounce one's U.S. citizenship in an American consulate, one does not lose it.

This change has occurred because, as of 1998, Brazil has begun to accept dual citizenship.

Hey, don't take it from an anonymous voice on the internet: go down to the consulate and ask. You will get the information that I've posted here. If you don't I'd certainly like to know what you've learned.




Patinho
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1/03/2003
14:01:49
RE: citizenship/residency
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I don't understand what is meant by the U.S. or Brazil "accepting" dual citizenship. First, I thought is was always accepted.... I didn't think it was a new thing.

I am not argueing here, rather I am asking. If a person came here from...Brazil 30 years ago, and did all the requirements to become an American citizen, then they would have to renounce their Brazilian citizenship, before becoming an American citizen? So then they would have to get a visa and passport to go back to Brazil? It seems to me they would have to if neither country accepted dual citizenship.

I know this is not the way it is, but if not... then wouldn't that person have dual citizenship anyway? So what exactly is meant by "accepting"?

Anyone?


Macunaima
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1/04/2003
09:27:45
RE: citizenship/residency
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Patinho,

30 years ago, in order to be a Brazilian or American, one needed to renounce all other citizenships.

In practice, it was a bit more complicated than that. Brazil, I believe, officially didn't recognize dual citizneship, but as long as a citizen didn't officially go to his consulate and renounce it, he wasn't docked his Brazilian citizenship when he became a citizen of another nation.

Until the Brazil recognized dual citizenship, however, if a U.S. citizen became a Brazilian, he ran the risk of losing his U.S. passport if the U.S. government was even officially informed of his new status by the Brazilian government.


Patinho
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1/04/2003
23:47:27
RE: citizenship/residency
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it sounds illogical... but I guess you learn something new everyday.... thanks


Brazilian Girl
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1/05/2003
08:02:05
RE: citizenship/residency
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Besides (and I know that because my friend married a German guy) you will only be granted with citizanship in Brazil after you have a child. Before that you will only be resident.


foreigner
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1/09/2003
11:51:32
RE: citizenship/residency
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Is adopting a brazilian child a possible and achievable alternative for a foreigner to gain permanent residence in Brazil ? if so any links for this?


Macunaima
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1/09/2003
12:42:37
RE: citizenship/residency
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Brazilian girl´s info is not exactly true.

Having a child is not a prerequisite for Brazilian citizenship.

One can get citizenship after residency if one stays in country for five years. This period is reduced to instantly if one has a Brazilian child. Also, IIRC, one can also get citizenship w/o residency (that´s a permanent visa or a "green card" for you confused folks out there) after 15 years of residency in Brazil.

This information is available on the Ministry of Justice´s Divisâo de Estrangeiros website.


foreigner
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1/11/2003
09:54:27
RE: citizenship/residency
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yes Macunaima, "This information is available on the Ministry of Justice´s Divisâo de Estrangeiros website." Here is the direct link:-
http://www.mj.gov.br/estrangeiros/permanencia.htm
If you can understand it, please tell me the answer to my question:- "Is adopting a brazilian child a possible and achievable alternative for a foreigner to gain permanent residence into Brazil ?"




Tore
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1/11/2003
12:08:02
RE: citizenship/residency
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One possible way to gain permanent visa in Brasil is to invest in a business with a minimum investment of US $ 200.000.-

I am able to offer such an opportunity in connection with my SEAWAY PROJECT which basically entails establishing a passenger service by modern catamaran between the towns of Rio de Janeiro - Angra dos Reis - Paraty - Ubatuba and Ilhabela/Sao Sebastiao.

For full details, use this web site:
http://www.yachtmarine.com/seaway/



Jason
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1/15/2003
21:21:45
RE: citizenship/residency
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I would like to live in Brasil with my friend.But i called the Brazilian consulate. and they said that i can only apply for a tourist visa. but i can only stay there 3 months so what do i do if i want to live with my friend just to learn the language and come back in 2 to 3 year .. well hope you can help.. Jason


scientist
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1/22/2003
07:29:00
RE: citizenship/residency
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CONCESSION OF PERMANENCE To the BEARER OF TEMPORARY VISA In the CONDITION OF PROFESSOR, TECHNICIAN OR RESEARCHER OF HIGH LEVEL And FOREIGN SCIENTIST.

What I want to know is has anyone got a permanent visa under this condition.

Is it as easy as "I have a bachelors degree in science and want to do research in my field". and you can have a permanent residence visa.
or is it still a matter of "please jump through this hoop next, .. adnauseam."


Translation by
http://babelfish.altavista.com/babelfish of this page

http://www.mj.gov.br/estrangeiros/concessao.htm#CONCESSÃO DE PERMANÊNCIA AO TITULAR DE VISTO TEMPORÁRIO NA CONDIÇÃO DE PROFESSOR, TÉCNICO OU PESQUISADOR DE ALTO NÍVEL E CIENTISTA ESTRANGEIRO:

gives:-

CONCESSION OF PERMANENCE To the BEARER OF TEMPORARY VISA In the CONDITION OF PROFESSOR, TECHNICIAN OR RESEARCHER OF HIGH LEVEL And FOREIGN SCIENTIST: Legal base: Normative resolution nº01/97 of the National Advice of Immigration. NECESSARY DOCUMENTS: 1- Certified copy of all the leves of the passport (for person); 2- Test of the nomination for the position which was approved, in public competition or, Employment contract, for the exercise of activity for superior stated period the 02 (two) years, together to the public or private entity of education, or cientifica and technological research; 3- Curriculum vitae; 4- Test of professional formation, through legalized and translated diplomas; 5- Petition by means of together proper form to be gotten to the Ministry of Justice or Polices Federal (for person); 6- Certified copy of the temporary register (identity card for foreigner or together register to the SPMAF, of the Federal Policy); 7- Declaration of that it was not condemned and does not answer the criminal proceeding in Brazil and the exterior; 8- Voucher of collect of the stipulated tax, in the original (for person), to be collected by means of GARFUNAPOL.Valor guide of the tax vide the table. Obs: After the fulfilling of the form and joined demanded documents, will have to be litigated in the agency of the Department of Federal Policy next to the residence of the petitioner. The maximum time enters the entrance of an order of concession of definitive Permanence to the bearer of temporary visa in the condition of professor, technician or researcher of high level and foreign scientist in the Division, until its publication, is of: - 01 (one) year, without requirement; - 01 (one) year and 6 (six) months with requirement leading in consideration the type of requirement. We stand out that all the documents produced in the exterior will have to be legalized together to the Brazilian consular authorities in the exterior, and translated for translator I publish sworn. We clarify that other documents could be requested, when to judge itself necessary.





Writer
Guest


1/22/2003
14:21:20
RE: citizenship/residency
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Message:
Here is my problem. I don't speak any Portuguese, but my father was a Brasilian citizen. I have all the proof for this, he died when I was 3 years old, because my mom is American, I just stayed here. I relatives there from my father, but the language barrier. I am trying to learn Brasilian Portuguese now. Now that I am a writer fulltime I wanted to go to Brasil and stay for a few years. What can I do or should do?

I was told by the US consulate because my mother never applied for Brasilian citizenship back then that I am just a tourist, is this true?

Thank you I have already learned so much from every thing posted on here. Great information. I am only 26 years old, so I don't know if age matters?


Critic
Guest


1/22/2003
14:56:44
Writer?
IP: Logged

Message:
Are you sure?


Oya
Guest


1/22/2003
19:21:23
RE: citizenship/residency
IP: Logged

Message:
Writer, if I were you I'd double check everything you've been told. I had a friend with not a similar situation, but was told the wrong information by the US offices in DC. Just double check, in fact go directly to your nearest Brazilian Embassy, or whatever office that represents Brazil in your state and speak directly to them. I don't see why you should have any problems. If you father is or was a citizen then you should be able to apply and be approved no matter the time, I would think. The only thing I can think of that may hinder you is because you say you dont speak Portuguese. But I still say that can be helped and I think you shouldn't have any problems. Check into some of the websites listed here by other posters. Good luck and you should be fine.


Freitas
Guest
 Email

1/27/2003
08:29:52
RE: citizenship/residency
IP: Logged

Message:
similar question to writer-
1. Does anyone know what documents are required to obtain brasilian citizenship? (both my parents are brasilian- still are- i was born in the US-we live here- but everyone else on both sides live there)
2. Is an 'Apostille' required or is that only a European thing?
3. Can the process be done at a brasilian consulate/embassy here in the US?



Writer
Guest


1/27/2003
09:06:12
RE: citizenship/residency
IP: Logged

Message:
Thank you Oya, for the information.

I am currently looking into this further. I definitely believe (now) that I was given incorrect information over the phone. Sometimes things are better done in person.

I will come back with the information I was given in a week or so. But this is definitely an "in person" situation.

Critic, thank you for the assessment, you are a 100% correct. My proofreading skills suck and sometimes even writers use incorrect grammar, misspell words, and falter on punctuation. One doesn't have to be a great in the aforementioned, to tell a story; although it does make the editor(s) job much easier, but they too must earn their living. Keep the inner critic alive, I take it all in stride.



Writer
Guest


1/27/2003
09:10:17
RE: citizenship/residency
IP: Logged

Message:
Correction: I will come back with the information given to me. I said "was given to me". Pardon my butchering of the American English language lol.


Dave
Guest


2/11/2003
20:27:59
RE: citizenship/residency
IP: Logged

Message:
Does anyone know if the federal police come and check up on you at your appartment during the naturalization/citizenship process?
I have a friend who is a bit concerned.


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