Back to our cover

Brazzil Forum [ return ]
FromMessage
Brz
Guest


10/14/2002
20:18:23
Subject: Big Mac versus Rodízio
IP: Logged

Message:
Considering the BIG desvalorization of REAL today,
Considering the Nr 1 of Mc Donalds (one Big Mac, 01 Coke and 01 French Fries) in Brazil is R$6,50 (U$1,75) and a good Rodízio with Picanha, Alcatra, Maminha, Cupin, Fraldinha, Bufalo Cheese, Contra Filé, Costela, Linguiça, farofa, arroz, bacalhau, camarăo, polenta, french fries, ovo de codorna, many salads, coke with lemon juice and ice, etc, etc, and etc is R$10,00 (U$2,63), I really prefer a good Rodízio than to eat " isopor " lunch in Mc Donalds.


Silvio
Guest
 Email

10/18/2002
09:28:42
RE: Big Mac versus Rodízio
IP: Logged

Message:
DO you know what they call a quarter pounder in Paris?

Royale With Cheese.

Do you know why?

Because they are on the metric system.

Big Mac is still Big Mac but it's called Le Big Mac.

My source didn't go to Burger King so I don't know what Whopper is.


Brazilian
Guest


10/18/2002
11:12:30
RE: Big Mac versus Rodízio
IP: Logged

Message:
Silvio,

Have you eaten a good Rodízio? In Brazil you eat the best rodízios of the world!

In the USA, you will find some Brazilian Churrascarias Rodízio, but are very expensive and don´t serve complete rodízios. Besides this, American people is accostumed to eat sweet meats and not meats with sal grosso and seasoned.

Have you eaten one time one arroz de carreteiro or a risoto or a arroz a grega?...

Picanha ao alho?

May be, the Randy, Patinho, and others in this forum has eaten this in Brazil, but I don´t know if they know to taste this kind of meals. Maybe, they prefer a Big Mac or a hot dog....




Randy Paul
Guest
 Email

10/18/2002
18:26:30
RE: Big Mac versus Rodízio
IP: Logged

Message:
I never eat at McDonalds!! Deus me livre!!

There are good rodizios here in the US (and they serve genuine Brazilian style meats), but they are expensive. I usually prefer to eat seafood and if I had a rodizio with grilled salmon, halibut, crab, lobster, shrimp, tuna, etc., I'd be very happy!


Brazilian
Guest


10/18/2002
19:23:12
RE: Big Mac versus Rodízio
IP: Logged

Message:
Randy,

Why the red meat in the USA and the steak houses are generally so expensive? You know that in Brazil you can eat very good food and with reasonable prices (of course, depend where you go to eat too...). But, I don´t understand one thing, the USA is one of the main producers of cattle and thus there is a plenty red meats, but generally the steak houses are very expensive. Why the reason? About the chicken, depending of the place also is very expensive. In Brazil, fish is expensive, but chicken, roast chicken (frango assado) is not expensive and in Brazil is one of the main world producers of the chickens of the world.
Other thing: The type of meat cuts are different in relation the meat cuts used in Brazil. When you go to a party, normally is served only one type of " churrasco " normally breast and of which normally don´t have any taste! and inclusive need to stay roasting during more than 6 hours and after you and others put that sweet sauce. Where is the Maminha? Picanha? Costela? Alcatra? Fraldinha? Cupin? Contra-Filé? Could you explain this?


Brazilian
Guest


10/18/2002
19:25:49
RE: Big Mac versus Rodízio
IP: Logged

Message:
By the way, the salmon in the USA is fantastic and normally is from Alaska, no? Put a lemon juice on the roasted salmon and go ahead!


Randy Paul
Guest
 Email

10/18/2002
20:19:21
RE: Big Mac versus Rodízio
IP: Logged

Message:
They do have alcatra and picanha here. Cupim is impossible to find, because it comes from the Brahma cattle (the one with the hump) and I have yet to see that breed here in the US.

We have many different cuts of meat here: costela (beef ribs), sirloin (lombo), flank steak (maminha), etc. Pork ribs are delicious.

You are absolutely right about the salmon. The best comes from the Pacific Northwest (Alaska, Washington, Oregon and British Columbia). The Alaskan halibut is also excellent as are the Dungeness Crabs.

You can find reasonable steakhouses heere, but definitely not like you can in Brazil.


Brazilian
Guest


10/18/2002
23:35:23
RE: Big Mac versus Rodízio
IP: Logged

Message:
Very good!

costela (beef ribs), sirloin (lombo), flank steak (maminha), etc. Pork ribs are delicious.

Please, translate: Fraldinha to the English and what is the difference eitheir a Top Sirloin and a Sirloin in the USA? By the way, what would be the Contra Filé in English? and the linguiça? Normally is different in the USA and is a sausage. There are some very good called smoked sausage, but the " linguiças " in the USA are generally different in relation the Brazilian " linguiças " no? Other thing, you don´t have " farofa ŕ base de farinha de mandioca ", no? and also mandioca frita, no? It is interesting because the mandioca is a root and could support the cold at least in south regions of the USA, but I think that don´t exist mandioca plantations in south of the USA and also don´t exist mandioca plantations in Mexico.

In Brazil, if you eat a " churrasco " barbecue in Rio Grande do Sul you don´t find cupin too and because the Brahma cattle is not bred there. But, if you eat a paulista churrasco, in Mato Grosso, Rio de Janeiro, etc, then you will find cupin normally. Gaúchos like to eat more costela, and fraldinha, but paulistas like to eat picanha and alcatra.

Other thing. How you speak in English the word: Pastel? There are not pastelarias in the USA, no? But, in some places you can find " păo de queijo ", no?



Randy Paul
Guest
 Email

10/19/2002
06:34:25
RE: Big Mac versus Rodízio
IP: Logged

Message:
Fraldinha I'm going to guess is what we call skirt steak. I know we don't call it little diapers! :-)

Contra file is filet mignon, and I would have to be a butcher to tell you the difference between a top sirloin and sirloin. As for sausage, we usually eat sausage based on another country's style: Spain, Italy, Poland, Germany, Portugal or Mexico for example.

When it comes to mandioca, if I am any indication, I don't think it will ever catch on here as potatoes are much more popular and versatile. You can still find mandioca in Latin neighborhoods in the US. I have never developed a taste for farofa. I tease my wife and call it areia.

Pastel in English if you are talking about salgadinhos is pastel or savory. If you are talking about sweets it's a turnover.

As for pao de queijo, I don't need to go to a shop. I'm married to a mineira! :-)


USCIT
Guest


10/19/2002
08:11:19
RE: Big Mac versus Rodízio
IP: Logged

Message:
Just a few food comments.

Brazilian, the main reason meats; beef, chicken and pork are so expensive in the U.S. is the sanitation procedures required by law in this country. There have been recent news items where a meat packer has sold many thousands pounds of such as hamburger and had to recall all of it because a bacteria was found when tested. A very expensive proceeding. And, to prevent it, a rather expensive process on the part of the meat packer. It does drive the price of meat up, but the consumer is much better assured of getting a meat that is safe to eat.

As to Big Mac's vs Rodízio, all foods are a matter of custom which is what develops personal taste. I personally like many Latino foods, my sister and her husband however do not. To each his own. We do have a few Mexican style food places where I am, which seem to make a decent living. However none that specialize in Brazilian foods that I know of. Maybe a business for someone to start?

Salmon in the U.S. can come from either the Pacific or the Atlantic. The States of Oregon, Washington, Idaho and even Montana have Salmon spawning grounds. Therefore fishing. As well as Alaska which has the most as far as Pacific salmon go. But much of the salmon eaten here also comes from the Atlantic. In fact one of the largest grocery chains (Albertson's) mainly sells Atlantic salmon. None of it is cheap however. Average price about $6.95 a pound when not on sale. Then it can be purchased at about $3.95 a pound. (Down rarely to $1.95 per pound) Compared to beef at about $3.95 a pound average with sales occasionally down to $0.50 a pound. Pork about the same. Chicken usually cheaper depending upon the cut. ($0.99 a pound up to $3.95 a pound.)(Prices in U.S. dollars)

A sirloin is the loin cut of a beef as might be expected. The Top part of the sirloin does not have any of the gristle that the bottom part of the loin may have. Therefore the difference. The Top is also supposed to have more flavor, although I don't personally find it so. My personal choice of meat cuts is the rib steak. More fat, but more flavor.

As to the sauces. The biggest factor in those is time. To properly cook a sauce, as most who do so know, is the time dedicated to it. In the U.S. where both man and wife work at jobs, they seldom take the time to cook these sauces. The price they pay for having such as a car, computer, cable TV and the like instead of fine dining. To pay for the cars etc, they don't have time to cook the sauces.

But the final factor of U.S. foods vs those of other countries is the melding of society. We have so many different peoples here that no ONE type food is liked by all. Therefore a resturant trying to draw a crowd from the largest number of people tones the taste of the foods down so the tastes of no one ethnic group stands out and hopefully, all will end up buying. Except for the few speciality houses, which then serve what you ask about. If they are Brazilian.

Main point being, after time and exposure, most people just say to hell with it and eat the more bland foods.




Brazilian
Guest


10/19/2002
12:39:05
RE: Big Mac versus Rodízio
IP: Logged

Message:
Thanks Randy and USCIT for the explanation given.

In Brazil, the most population loves to buy fresh bread in padarias (bakeries) and to eat a good French bread " fresquinho " (baked on the time). The Brazilian people loves also " baguetes " and mixto quente ( a sawduich of ham and cheese ), as well as other loves to eat " păo com mortadela ", and in the morning the breakfast is very different in relation the American breakfast. In Brazil is normally a " pingado " (coffee with milk) and a " păo com manteiga " (bread with a little of butter).

USCIT commented about the lack of time to cook with seazoned food and sauces. But, there is in the channels TVs in the USA a lot of cooking programs and having a great audience and selling books and videos, dvds, etc... It means that there is a great number of aficionados to cook with sauces and seazoned foods. If you cook a good rice, you need to put salt and other sauces, case contrary you are not going to eat a good food.

If you go to Săo Paulo City, you will find one of the BEST places of the world to eat very good food and of various types of dishes.


Po
Guest
 Email

10/19/2002
13:16:36
RE: Big Mac versus Rodízio
IP: Logged

Message:

When I've been to Brazil I've had some of the best pizza in my life. Struck me as kind of weird, because I didn't expect Brazil to have such good pizza. It had that really tasty cornmeal on the bottom and the spices were perfect.

What is the coffee like there? I've never had any.


Brazilian
Guest


10/19/2002
18:54:21
RE: Big Mac versus Rodízio
IP: Logged

Message:
In Săo Paulo City, you can eat one of the best pizzas of the world and there are two type of " massas ", one is " massa fina " and other is " massa grossa ". Normally the " massa grossa " is seems with the " massa from Napóles ". You can find a hiper variety of tastes too. In Săo Paulo City is concentraded one of the most Italian colonies of the world and therefore you can find excellent " rodízios " of pizzas, of " massas " (pastas) in Săo Paulo and inclusive rodízios of fish from several regions of the Brazil. Săo Paulo is known as " Capital Gastronômica " in Brazil.


USCIT
Guest


10/19/2002
18:54:31
RE: Big Mac versus Rodízio
IP: Logged

Message:
Brazilian,

I can very easily be convinced that the foods in Brazil are much better on the average than those in the U.S.. I would delight in going to a padarias in the morning and having french bread fresh from the oven.

You are also very correct in that TV here offers many cooking programs, and cook book sales are a good business. I have about 15 cook books sitting on my shelves, maybe three of which I have actually opened and used. They sell good anyway. When I am hungry. I assume there are many others just like me. Wanna be's, but just not quite making the grade. (I'm a horrible sauce cook.)

However, when I speak of lack of time I speak mainly of the Husband/Wife family, both working, with 2 kids, attending school. Games, plays, and so on to attend. Many of the older people are good cooks and keep the art alive. But I don't think the 'average' U.S. person takes the time they should to prepare and enjoy foods as do peoples from other cultures. Including Brazilian.

I also feel our restruants here generally serve very bland foods unless they are speciality houses. For reasons stated in my previous note.

I've many friends who claim to be good cooks. They make ONE sauce, to perfection. But that is it. Their one claim to cooking fame. I only know of one person, and I do know a great many people, who is actually a GOOD cook.

So, I posted from my own personal experience. A moment in the life of a U.S. Cit.

While I'm on the subject of foods, I also feel that Brazilians are probably better fed nutritionally than we are in the U.S. from what I read. You have a much greater variety of fresh fruits and vegetables available all of the time. As well as the meat proteins and such. A great advantage.

In the U.S. many of things such as fruits are picked long before they are ripe and expected to ripen in transit to market. Leaving a great deal to be desired in the matter of taste. And who knows what nutritional value they have.

o viva la Brasileiro cozinhar!









Brazilian
Guest


10/19/2002
19:05:08
RE: Big Mac versus Rodízio
IP: Logged

Message:
Brazilian people normally eat a lot. WE are big eaters of food and normally the Brazilian is very exigent with the quality of the food and the taste. But, we have the same problems of which have the American people with the fat. It is a problem of the modern and sedentary life of which we live today. Unfortunately almost all that is tasteful has fat and it is not so good to the health.


Po
Guest
 Email

10/19/2002
19:07:46
RE: Big Mac versus Rodízio
IP: Logged

Message:
I know what you mean about people claiming to be "good cooks."

Cooking is much, much harder than people think. To evaluate changing chemicals (which is what cooking is) is truly a science. To do it well is art. I was raised on fast food, and my mother never cooked. When she did, it was pretty bad. Thus, I had no one to learn cooking from. When I moved out and got an apartment I learned to cook for myself. USCIT, I fall into one category you talked about -- I cook 3 or 4 things very well, and past that, I'm useless. It takes an enormous amount of time to cook things well, and it has literally taken me years to get even these 4 dishes correct.


Brazilian
Guest


10/19/2002
19:09:02
RE: Big Mac versus Rodízio
IP: Logged

Message:
By the way, I forgot to mention the Croassaints of which are sold in good padarias.


Brazilian
Guest


10/19/2002
21:21:26
RE: Big Mac versus Rodízio
IP: Logged

Message:
Yes, to cook well is an art.


Joquim
Guest


10/20/2002
14:36:10
RE: Big Mac versus Rodízio
IP: Logged

Message:
I had my first Big Mac in my life a few weeks ago (a month?). The next day I had food poisoning for about 6 days...I bought the Kids Meal for my 4 yr. old daughter and found out later that even she does not eat hamburgers...thus I had already eaten it and was personally contaminated.

My few years in Rio I relished the sidewalk lonchonettes.

Long live Rio (real) Food.




Brent
Guest


10/20/2002
16:09:21
RE: Big Mac versus Rodízio
IP: Logged

Message:
Joquem said:
I had my first Big Mac in my life a few weeks ago (a month?). The next day I had food poisoning for about 6 days...I bought the Kids Meal for my 4 yr. old daughter and found out later that even she does not eat hamburgers...thus I had already eaten it and was personally contaminated.
----------------------------

If you had food poisoning for 6 days, then you must have eaten some contaminated food for about 6 straight days. Do you mean that you were sick for 6 days? If so, that's hardly food poisoning. If you eat contaminated food, you'll generally be well within a day or two, unless you have the metabolism of a 100-year-old man.

Sounds to me like you just got sick. Millions of people eat Big Macs every day, and they have no problems. The fact that you got ill is not the fault of McDonald's, nor the fault of the Big Mac sandwich.



USCIT
Guest


10/20/2002
22:29:42
RE: Big Mac versus Rodízio
IP: Logged

Message:
Brent.

True story. No exaggeration. Many years ago during my wandering days, I felt fine one day, ate at a greasy spoon cafe that evening, and within a few hours was almost comatose for about 4 days. I managed to stumble into an old abandonded shed where I lay. I occasionally recognized light and dark, but that was all I was aware of. I certainly did not eat or drink anything else.

I was in exceptional health. Young and hearty. My matabolism would normally process about anything.

Food poisoning can last several days. That I know.

Comic part of the story. When I finally did come 'back to life' I wanted something to eat and drink. I searched the shed and found an almost full bottle of Southern Comfort Whiskey. After that many days without eating, then pouring whiskey into my gullet (I didn't say I was bright) I was a raging drunk.

I left the shed in the dark of night and saw space ships. Huge. Right in my path. No way around them. They were wailing and whistling and talking to one another. I had to sneak past. Even drunk I knew I needed food. I got on my hands and knees and crept toward the creatures.

When close enough, I saw they were high tension power lines.

To this day, I hate the taste of Southern Comfort Whiskey.


Brent
Guest


10/21/2002
09:36:52
RE: Big Mac versus Rodízio
IP: Logged

Message:
Well, I stand corrected.

I was just going by what my doctor told me. If you were
hallucinating and shit, maybe that was beyond what we
normally think of as "food poisoning." Cool story though.
Sounds like something Henry Rollins would say.

On a similar note, I was sick last week. Flu-like symptoms.
When I couldn't shake it by the third day, I tried a remedy an
old Russian pianist told me about: an 8oz glass of vodka, with
a clove of garlic steeped in it overnight. I gulped it all down at
8am, and then (obviously) went back to bed.

I kid you not--the next day I not only felt better, I was 100%
better. Sure, the garlic vodka tasted like pure evil, and my
breath stunk, but next time I get sick I'm doing that again. He
also told me it works on sore joints.


crackers
Guest


10/21/2002
09:39:28
RE: Big Mac versus Rodízio
IP: Logged

Message:
space ships? its really amazing to me. i've never seen
anything like that and i dont want to. maybe mcdonalds isnt so
good now but i like it a lot when i was younger and got the cool
toys. maybe ill go eat this foods now...!


crackers
Guest


10/21/2002
09:39:29
RE: Big Mac versus Rodízio
IP: Logged

Message:
space ships? its really amazing to me. i've never seen
anything like that and i dont want to. maybe mcdonalds isnt so
good now but i like it a lot when i was younger and got the cool
toys. maybe ill go eat this foods now...!


USCIT
Guest


10/21/2002
10:48:38
RE: Big Mac versus Rodízio
IP: Logged

Message:
Must admit Brent, even if your drink tasted foul, it was much better than mine. <g> I'll have to try that next time I need it.

I do believe there are different types of food poisoning, but not medico enough to know what they are. Just that what I had was rather severe.

Also had a friend who had a similar experience. He was manning a fire tower in the Washington (state) forest. He was sick for days. Unable to even crawl across the small tower room to get to the radio to call for help. He got his by not washing his skillet and scraping the bottom one day when he served his food. His sanitation methods improved greatly when he finally came back around.

Anyway, it happens.

But it wasn't Big Mac's, Crackers. They hadn't been invented yet when I got that. It was a noodle and meat dish of some sort, though don't recall now just what one. And as I say, served at a greasy spoon cafe. I was poor and needed cheap food.


Brazilian
Guest


10/21/2002
22:50:34
RE: Big Mac versus Rodízio
IP: Logged

Message:
When you are in Brazil, ask in a good lanchonete, a good " churrasquinho ao vinagrete ". There is some thing very different than a Big Mac.


Po
Guest
 Email

10/22/2002
07:24:20
RE: Big Mac versus Rodízio
IP: Logged

Message:

I forgot to mention: I've also had those ham and cheese
sandwiches people were talking about above. They are
outstanding and cheap.

Can someone tell me what the coffee is like in Brazil? I've not
had it yet. I've heard it is really good and really strong, and that
it's more like espresso. Is this true?

The only thing I didn't like in Brazil was some kind of fruit juice.
I can't remember the name. It tasted like dirty feet. Bleech!

Po!


Randy Paul
Guest
 Email

10/22/2002
07:53:40
RE: Big Mac versus Rodízio
IP: Logged

Message:
Sounds like açaí, definitely an acquired taste.


Brazilian
Guest


10/22/2002
21:45:59
RE: Big Mac versus Rodízio
IP: Logged

Message:
Coffee:
Brazilian coffee is a true coffee and not an " American tea coffee " of which you drink in the USA )))):)))......

A " cafézinho " in Brazil and mainly made in an express machine is a small cup of which is at least 10 times stronger than the BIG American mugs with " tea coffee " of which you drink every day in the USA.

The Brazilian coffee is stronger than the Colombian coffee. Colombian coffee is milder in relation the Brazilian coffee.

If you need to keep your eyes very well open, then I recommend the Brazilian " cafézinho " very well consistent and " puro " (pure). But, it is necessary to be a Brazilian coffee from state of the Săo Paulo, because if you drink a " mineiro " cafézinho is equal an American " tea coffee " and the same in Rio de Janeiro, which is a " tea coffee " and inclusive when you are in Săo Paulo, if you want a coffee very weak (American tea coffee), then you ask for a " carioca " it means a coffee very weak in a small cup where you can see the bottom of the cup and remember your traditional American " tea coffee ".)))):)))....

When you enter in a padaria or lanchonete or bar and ask for a " cafézinho ", the clerk will ask a question to you. What kind of coffee you want? There are some kinds of which are offered to you.


Randy Paul
Guest
 Email

10/23/2002
06:03:09
RE: Big Mac versus Rodízio
IP: Logged

Message:
>If you need to keep your eyes very well open, then I recommend the Brazilian " cafézinho " very well consistent and " puro " (pure). But, it is necessary to be a Brazilian coffee from state of the Săo Paulo, because if you drink a " mineiro " cafézinho is equal an American " tea coffee " and the same in Rio de Janeiro, which is a " tea coffee " and inclusive when you are in Săo Paulo, if you want a coffee very weak (American tea coffee), then you ask for a " carioca " it means a coffee very weak in a small cup where you can see the bottom of the cup and remember your traditional American " tea coffee ".)))):)))....

This is chauvinist nonsense, obviously written by a Paulista.

I have spent a lot of time in Minas Gerais and have had some excellent coffee. There is an excellent fazenda de cafe in Itaipé in Minas Gerais as well as some other high quality coffee growers in Minas. Indeed, Minas has now surpassed Săo Paulo state as the largest producer of coffee in brazil.


BRENT
Guest


10/23/2002
07:52:23
RE: Big Mac versus Rodízio
IP: Logged

Message:

I have some comments, Brazilian:

>>A " cafézinho " in Brazil and mainly made in an express
machine is a small cup of which is at least 10 times stronger
than the BIG American mugs with " tea coffee " of which you
drink every day in the USA. <<

So what? Strong coffee is not necessarily GOOD coffee.
That's what you're implying. And what the hell does "tea
coffee" mean. You put it in quotes, but you don't explain it.

>>The Brazilian coffee is stronger than the Colombian coffee.
Colombian coffee is milder in relation the Brazilian coffee. <<

Again, this matters not. And no one asked about Columbian
coffee. We get the picture--Brazil has the "strongest" coffee
in the world. That doesn't mean it tastes good.

>> But, it is necessary to be a Brazilian coffee from state of
the Săo Paulo, because if you drink a " mineiro " cafézinho is
equal an American " tea coffee " and the same in Rio de
Janeiro, which...<<<

Blah, blah, blah. This reminds me of the Irish when talking
about Guinness: "Ye can't have Guinness in America; it's shite!
Guinness in England is shite! Ye have to have Guinness in
Dublin, but in the northeast of Dublin. Any Guinness in the rest
of Dublin is shite!"

>>if you want a coffee very weak (American tea coffee), then
you ask for a " carioca " it means a coffee very weak in a
small cup where you can see the bottom of the cup and
remember your traditional American " tea coffee ".)))):)))<<<<

I'm drinking an American coffee right this second, and I can't
see the bottom of the cup. The coffee is from Starbucks.
Pretty soon, all those coffee places in Sao Paulo will be taken
over by Starbucks. Get used to our coffee.

This is all elitest nonsense. The guy was just asking what
Brazilian coffee is like, not whether you think it's better than
American coffee. Maybe some people like both.



Vargas
Guest


10/23/2002
10:30:55
RE: Big Mac versus Rodízio
IP: Logged

Message:
heh heh heh... brent, man, that's funny. starbucks for
everyone. and yeah, what the hell is "tea coffee"? water
through grounds, right? c'mon. also, what's up with all the
different places "tea coffee" is available in brazil? it seems
like you have to specifically ask for the cafezino or whatever
or else they always serve you a "tea coffee" in brazil. man, if
he copped an attitude like that up here, they might tea-bag his
coffee, but he'd never get a "tea coffee," no matter how
pretentious he was. 'hey barrista! i'd like a venti soy vanila
cafezino with a chocolate covered graham cracker please.'


Brazilian
Guest


10/23/2002
13:07:13
RE: Big Mac versus Rodízio
IP: Logged

Message:
The problem is that you and others are accostumed to drink " dirt water "...:))))) Yes! " Tea Coffee " ! What hell you can say that American coffee is coffee??... " Tea coffee " is more appropriated..:))))....

About the Minas, yes. There is today a big production of coffee, but the problem isn´t the production and the quality of the coffee, but the manner to do a good coffee! You go to the Minas, then you drink " dirt water " ! It is true! you see the bottom of the cup, as you see the bottom of the cup of an American coffee! It seems only a " dirt water " or simply a " tea coffee " (and depends, because you can find good teas where you can´t see the bottom of the cup...). But, there is taste for anything in this life. There is people that love " tea coffee ", " dirt water ", and there is people who loves a good and strong coffee!

About the Colombian coffee in relation the Brazilian coffee. There are some differences and due the climate and the regions where the coffee plantations are made. Brazilian coffee is normally more acid, sour, and the Colombian coffee is not acid and is much more milder than the Brazilian coffee.

In Brazil, depending of the region where has a coffee plantation, there is difference either a coffee and other quality of coffee. The coffee of which you will find in Minas is a good coffee, but it is more milder than the paulista coffee plantation. There are various regions and various types of coffees, but the question is the manner how is made a good coffee, and sincerely the mineiro coffee is equal a dirt water or a tea coffee, as well as in Rio de Janeiro. If you like a good and strong coffee, then you need to drink a good Café do Ponto, Paulista coffees express machines, etc. But, you need to know how to ask a good coffee too. In case contrary, the clerk can give you a bad coffee.


Brent
Guest


10/23/2002
13:25:06
RE: Big Mac versus Rodízio
IP: Logged

Message:

Brazilian, what you are saying is: "You can get good coffee in
Brazil, but you have to be in Sao Paulo. Otherwise, you'll get
American coffee. But even in Sao Paulo, you have to know
how to ask for good coffee, otherwise you'll get American
coffee."

Sounds to me like you'll get something similar to "American
coffee" no matter where you go, unless you ask for a "good
coffee."

Duh! Well anywhere you go in the U.S., you can ask for an
espresso or a cappucino. If you ask for a coffee, you'll get a
coffee. Just like in Brazil -- if you ask for a coffee, you'll get a
coffee.

You have shed no light on anything. Pretty much, it's the same
in Brazil.


Brazilian
Guest


10/23/2002
13:34:19
RE: Big Mac versus Rodízio
IP: Logged

Message:
Brnt wrote:

..." Duh! Well anywhere you go in the U.S., you can ask for an
espresso or a cappucino. If you ask for a coffee, you'll get a
coffee. Just like in Brazil -- if you ask for a coffee, you'll get a
coffee." ...

Brazilian Paulista Coffee, please!:)))))....





Brazilian
Guest


10/23/2002
13:37:12
RE: Big Mac versus Rodízio
IP: Logged

Message:

Brazilian Paulista Coffee, please!:)))))....

And curto and puro ( and short and pure ).:))))...



Randy Paul
Guest
 Email

10/23/2002
13:39:23
RE: Big Mac versus Rodízio
IP: Logged

Message:
Why, when the best coffee comes from Minas?


King Kong
Guest


10/23/2002
13:53:04
RE: Big Mac versus Rodízio
IP: Logged

Message:
to the guy who wrote:

>>>>Blah, blah, blah. This reminds me of the Irish when talking
about Guinness: "Ye can't have Guinness in America; it's shite!
Guinness in England is shite! Ye have to have Guinness in
Dublin, but in the northeast of Dublin. Any Guinness in the rest
of Dublin is shite!"


actually, not just any pub in Dublin will do! A number of them serve shite (Shyte??) Guinness as well. Gots to know which pub is good. And in Some Places Best Not Mentioned, it comes down to knowing which tap in the same pub is the right one! otherwise, you get shite!


Vargas
Guest


10/23/2002
14:50:27
RE: Big Mac versus Rodízio
IP: Logged

Message:
yeah, and not only that, you have to make sure that only an
actual, regionally correct irishman in ireland is pouring the
guinness from that one special tap in the one pub. of course,
there's only one man that fits the bill -- seamus o'grady, age
57. i have his phone number. hey brazillian -- i'll trade you
seamus' phone number for the lowdown on the one proper
barrista in the one proper coffee shop in the one correct town
in brazil and the password i'm going to need to get that
coffee...


Mad Max
Guest


10/23/2002
17:24:20
RE: Big Mac versus Rodízio
IP: Logged

Message:
Now you guys is all battin up the wrong tree. The way you get a 'good' cup of coffee is to take a coffee bean er so, smash em up a bit, and add hot water. Now its the ratio between the water and the beans that makes the best coffee. The more beans you got, the stronger the coffee. That's the whole sum and total of it.

Thing some people don't know is that a coffee bean starts losing its flavor the 'minute' it is smashed up or ground. That's right from the start. So, the sooner you make yer coffee after mashin up that bean, the better the taste will be.

Well, cept fer another thing. Depends a bit on the water. Iff'n you got water with such as a lot of soda in it, the coffee will taste different than if the water is distilled. To give a radical example. Though I know folks here ain't radical.

Now if the bean loses its flavor right after its mashed, then the bean can't be transported very far for a test. But most water does move around pretty good. So I guess the best way to check this out is to charter an aeroplane and fly over there to them places mentioned where the beans are, taking jugs of yer own water and make a cup at each place. Ya gives that a taste test, then fly on to the next place. Ya gets em all checked out and can remember, you'll know where the best coffee's from. Purty simple you ask me.

Course there is another way. Instead of adding hot water to the beans, you can steam them. They calls that espresso most places. You steam them thar crushed beans up in a holder till a kind of syrup drips down and then drink that. The sooner you drink it after the drippin, the stronger the coffee.

I minds a time my daddy was a gonna try out some of them there brazilian beans. He fixes him up a brew pot so's he can steam them. Takes awhile. Unc'l Jed comes along about half tanked, as he usually is, thought Pappy was a makin whiskey. Gulped down what was made, ain't spoke to Pappy since. Some fellers jest don't like that there Zillian coffee it appears.


Brazilian
Guest


10/24/2002
00:32:33
RE: Big Mac versus Rodízio
IP: Logged

Message:
Hey, Mad Max,

Good point! But, can you imagine Randy drinking " dirt water made in Minas " and to say that that is a good coffee?... It is the same to enter in an Albertson´s Market and take a free big mug full of dirt water called American coffee where you see the bottom of the mug and drink and say that that is a good coffee!?...

Fica sonhando Randy....

Come on... To say that the coffee who is prepared for a mineiro is good is the same to drink a free " dirt water " in an Albertson´s market...

I know your wife is a Mineira, but you should recognize that the mineiros prepare a true " dirt water " or " mineiro tea coffee " and not a real and true coffee. The question is that you are accostumed to drink a " tea coffee " since when you was a children and thus you like of " mineiro tea coffee ". It is normal... It is obvious...




Randy Paul
Guest
 Email

10/24/2002
06:40:07
RE: Big Mac versus Rodízio
IP: Logged

Message:
>I know your wife is a Mineira, but you should recognize that the mineiros prepare a true " dirt water " or " mineiro tea coffee " and not a real and true coffee. The question is that you are accostumed to drink a " tea coffee " since when you was a children and thus you like of " mineiro tea coffee ". It is normal... It is obvious...

Opiniăo e cu: cade um tem um.


Brazilian
Guest


10/24/2002
11:40:34
RE: Big Mac versus Rodízio
IP: Logged

Message:
Randy wrote:

..." Opiniăo e cu: cade um tem um. " ...

It is true! But, to drink a " mineiro dirt water or tea coffee " can give a big diarrhea too...



Brent
Guest


10/24/2002
12:09:17
RE: Big Mac versus Rodízio
IP: Logged

Message:
So what? I got diahrreah when I went to Mexico. That doesn't
mean their food is bad, it just means I couldn't handle it
beceause of the bacteria.

This conversation is getting very tiring. You're a coffee snob.
We realize your position. In the U.S., people like you sit in
cafes and wear berets and smoke long cigarettes and write
"poetry" and talk about Sartre.


Randy Paul
Guest
 Email

10/24/2002
12:20:57
RE: Big Mac versus Rodízio
IP: Logged

Message:
Brent, not only is he a snob, but he is one who doesn't know what he's talking about.

"Brazilian"

You've probably heard this one.

Um mineiro chegou ao loja em Săo Paulo. Ele pediu o dono da loja:

"Quero comprar um pinico."

Dono respondeu:

"Que é isso?"

Mineiro explicou pra o paulista.

Dono falou:

"Aqui nós chamos essa coisa um mineiro."

Mineiro respondeu:

"Entăo me dá um. Quero encher com paulista."


Gil
Guest


10/24/2002
13:24:53
Coffee VS Café
IP: Logged

Message:
About coffee in Brazil:

Despite what my compatriot from Sao Paulo has said, let me explain a few things. Coffee in Brazil, no matter where you go, is indeed far stronger than what you taste elsewhere so be carefull and take it easy. First of all a good coffee here in Brazil has severall different aromatic brands that we don't export, so try feeling the aroma first and then taste it slowly. Second, there seems to be two types of coffee consumed here in Brazil, the Sao Paulo brand, which is stronger and can be found also in Rio and the south of Brazil, and the Minas Gerais (Mineiro) brand also found in Rio and in the north and central region of Brazil. I miself like more the mineiro one which is lighter and has a more pleasant aroma, but nevertheless the "paulista" is quite good.


Mad Max
Guest


10/24/2002
14:51:03
RE: Big Mac versus Rodízio
IP: Logged

Message:
HEY, 9 points for GIL. He's the first one to come up with an intelligent answer to the initial question. I'd give him a 10 but he didn't address espresso. I kinda like that stuff.


Brazilian
Guest


10/24/2002
19:00:06
RE: Big Mac versus Rodízio
IP: Logged

Message:
Hey Handy,

In the state of Săo Paulo, paulistas don´t sell pinico; why? because the cities in the state of Săo Paulo in the houses have discharge pipe and sewerage system where the mineiros and nordestinos work to clean. For this reason they are accostumed to clean this and mainly in the Tięte river and Pinheiros river. But, in Minas, it is possible you find some sewerages system. For example, in Belo Horizonte. There are Mineiros who know this system now...

One Mineiro arrived in Săo Paulo and he asked for an owner of a newspaper " banca de jornais " to give a " estadăo velho " and the owner of the " banca de jornais " delivered a map of Minas to him...


Brazilian
Guest


10/24/2002
19:06:44
RE: Big Mac versus Rodízio
IP: Logged

Message:
Hey Handy,

Do you know why a Mineiro when go to the " roça " he takes a " enxada com o cabo longo "?.... No?..." é para ficar longe do trabalho"... Do you know the difference either a mineiro and one baiano?
Mineiro is a baiano who stoped in the half of a way when he would want to go to Săo Paulo, but he took tired and stayed in Minas.


Randy Paul
Guest
 Email

10/25/2002
06:20:24
RE: Big Mac versus Rodízio
IP: Logged

Message:
>Mineiro is a baiano who stoped in the half of a way when he would want to go to Săo Paulo, but he took tired and stayed in Minas.

Nice to see that not only do you recycle stale jokes, but that you're racist, too.


braslvr
Guest


10/25/2002
08:52:00
RE: Big Mac versus Rodízio
IP: Logged

Message:
>Nice to see that not only do you recycle stale jokes, but that you're racist, too.

Also evident by his constant references to Nordestinos being inferior.


Brazilian
Guest


10/25/2002
22:19:53
RE: Big Mac versus Rodízio
IP: Logged

Message:
Who sustaint the economy of the Brazil are the paulista people (the state of the Săo Paulo)and that stale jokes have the bottom of the true.


Gil
Guest


10/26/2002
02:58:13
Sao Paulo vs Resto
IP: Logged

Message:
One thing is to sustain the economy, the other is concentrating more riches and "means of production" in a single city. By the way, with most of the working class being natural to other regions... Very stupid in my opinion.

I hope that this regional bickering stops here, it is very uncivil and adds nothing to the discussion.

"A half truth is a lie as any...



Guest


10/26/2002
03:05:18
RE: Big Mac versus Rodízio
IP: Logged

Message:
Meu café é melhor, eu sou mais rico, bla, bla...

Sua capital é suja, seu povo é neurótico, sua comida regional năo existe, ninguém ouve sua música... Enfia seu dinheiro e roda


Randy Paul
Guest
 Email

10/26/2002
07:14:37
RE: Big Mac versus Rodízio
IP: Logged

Message:
>Who sustaint the economy of the Brazil are the paulista people (the state of the Săo Paulo)and that stale jokes have the bottom of the true.

BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH!

Zé and Gil:

I couldn't agree more.


Brazilian
Guest


10/26/2002
19:40:30
RE: Big Mac versus Rodízio
IP: Logged

Message:
Who sustaint the economy of the Brazil are the paulista people (the state of the Săo Paulo).

Like or not like it is true. Săo Paulo: a locomotiva do Brasil!


Randy Paul
Guest
 Email

10/27/2002
18:18:30
RE: Big Mac versus Rodízio
IP: Logged

Message:
>Like or not like it is true. S?o Paulo: a locomotiva do Brasil!

I could really care less about that. I just detest those among you who are snobby and racist such as yourself.


Brazilian
Guest


10/27/2002
20:59:49
RE: Big Mac versus Rodízio
IP: Logged

Message:
Viva Săo Paulo!! A locomotiva do Brasil!!


P 1

Back to our cover