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Subject: Dengue Fever in Recife?


Posted by Markus
On Friday, March 22, 2002 at 09:59:45

Message:
My friends in Recife tell me that there is a
major outbreak of dengue fever this month
(March) in the NE of Brazil. Are other areas
affected? I heard that Rio was also facing a
similar epidemic. Will the onset of winter
reduce the problem?
RE: Dengue Fever in Recife?
Posted by braslvr
On Friday, March 22, 2002 at 15:34:23

Message:
My friends in Rio Grande do Norte tell me that there has been abnormal amounts of rainfall and flooding the past few months. Combined with the normal high temperatures of the region, this would tend to make the mosquito population explode. I think only less standing water would reduce the problem. Sources in Rio deny there is a problem there, for what it is worth.
RE: Dengue Fever in Recife?
Posted by Jo
On Monday, April 01, 2002 at 11:50:34

Message:
Yes, there were many cases of dengue here in Recife, but now it has declined. People are being very careful with standing rainwater.

Yes, it was worse in Rio, but there also the number of cases is declining.


RE: Dengue Fever in Recife?
Posted by Randy
On Tuesday, April 02, 2002 at 08:29:51

Message:
Thanks Jo! I was wondering if it was declining because I was not seeing much news about it lately. Good news!
RE: Dengue Fever in Recife?
Posted by Jo
On Tuesday, April 16, 2002 at 02:20:38

Message:
I may have spoken too soon. The hoopla has died down, but cases do continue.

This is an article from my most recent Gringoes Newsletter from Sao Paulo. I have seen that there are quite a few cases here in Recife still, but there seem to be fewer at my school in Boa Viagem. Here in Recife there have been some hemmoragic strains, but only 9 or 10 cases.


Dengue Spreads in Rio

The recent dengue rage in Rio de Janeiro is not letting up with more than 80,000 cases registered since January of this year. According to official figures a total of 500 people have contracted the most virulent strain of dengue fever, which is transmitted by mosquitoes, and 31 people have died from internal hemorrhaging caused by the disease. Health officials and even the army has been called in to try and eradicate the disease by fumigating streets and clearing stagnant water receptor, which provide an ideal breeding ground for mosquitoes.
Most dengue sufferers recover after about a week of flu-like symptoms, but a rare hemorrhagic form causes internal bleeding as the person seems to be recovering. There are four strains and no vaccine.
The number of dengue cases worldwide each year is estimated at 50 million, with more than 20,000 deaths, according to the Washington-based Pan American Health Organization.

4/15/2002


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