• Categories
  • Archives

Tourism Starts Showing at Brazil’s Balance of Payments

The increase in the number of foreign tourists visiting Brazil has begun to make a difference in the country’s balance of payments. Tourism is usually calculated as “invisible trade” in the current account (trade) area of international transactions.

According to the president of the Embratur (Empresa Brasileira de Turismo – Brazilian Tourism Corporation), Eduardo Sanovicz, “Tourism is an important commercial element. It is part of our economic agenda because it is profitable for Brazil, creates jobs, income and development.”


Although final data on tourism in 2004 is not available yet, Embratur estimates that the total number of foreign tourists who visited Brazil should reach 4.6 million, an increase of 12% over 2003.


Meanwhile, the Central Bank reports that from January to November those tourists spent US$ 2.88 billion in Brazil, an increase of 31.2%.


“Those dollars went into the pockets of thousands of Brazilians who work in the sector today,” points out Sanovicz.


Tourism in Rio de Janeiro has gotten a boost from cruise ships. This year a total of 85 of them are scheduled to dock in Rio.


It is estimated that during this season (which runs from October to April) they will bring US$ 55 million to the city in revenue, up from US$ 40 million during the last season.


The president of the company which handles the cruise ships in Rio (Pier Mauá S/A), Pedro Guimarães, says last year’s highlight was the inaugural trip by the Queen Mary, which carries 2,600 passengers.


“They were in Rio for four days. And the best part was that they made Rio the final port of one voyage and the starting port of another,” said Guimarães.


Translation: Allen Bennett
Agência Brasil

Tags:

  • Show Comments (0)

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

comment *

  • name *

  • email *

  • website *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Ads

You May Also Like

Thanks to Rain Brazil’s Soy and Corn Crop Won’t Be as Bad as Expected

Following abundant rains last month, which eased crop damage caused by a drought, soybean ...

Brazil: Two Ex-Cops Get 31 Years in Jail for Torturing Journalists

Two Brazilian former police officers  were convicted for being part of the militia that ...

Bazilian NGOs Urge Lula to Up State Presence in the Amazon

Various non-governmental organizations (NGOs) addressed a letter yesterday to President Luiz Inácio Lula da ...

For Brazilians, Vote Buying Scandal Is Just Politics as Usual, Shows Poll

Most Brazilians associate the recent charges and investigations of federal government corruption with the ...

US, Europe and Asia Say Present at Brazil’s Medical Fair, Hospitalar

Forty three Brazilian companies participated in the business roundtables of Hospitalar, a trade fair ...

Rio, Brazil: Rocinha Sings for Peace

Hoping to bring a semblance of normality back to the Rocinha shantytown, in Rio, ...

Tough Choice

The Landless Movement in Brazil is a success. One quarter of a million people ...

Final Numbers In: Brazil’s Economy Grew Mere 2.3% in 2005

The Brazilian economy ended up growing 2.3% in 2005 in comparison with 2004, when ...

Brazil’s Experimental Theater Group Invited to Play in Cairo Festival

Forte Casa Teatro, a group of actors from São Paulo, in southeastern Brazil, was ...