In Brazil, Women Have Better Schooling than Men, But Worse Wages

Brazilian women conquered more space on the labor market in 2003 and surpassed men in years of schooling. But they were unable to overcome their disadvantages compared with men in terms of salaries and positions.

This is one of the main findings of the Brazilian Institute of Geography and Statistic’s (IBGE) Synthesis of Social Indicators, 2004.


According to the study, the number of women who worked as employees in 2003 grew 4% in comparison with 2002, from 37.6% to 41.6%.


There were also significant increases in the proportions of women in the categories of domestic workers (from 14.5% to 18.6%) and employers (from 0.8% to 2.7%).


On the other hand, female participation declined in the categories of unpaid workers (from 13.4% to 10.1%) and self-employed workers (from 24.3% to 17.5%).


On the male side, the situation remained practically unchanged between 2002 and 2003. Over half the men were either employees (55.7%), self-employed workers (27.1%), or employers (5.5%).


The study also reveals that female employment is still concentrated in the service sector (49.1%), just as in 2002, with a slight increase (0.5%) in the sector of commerce and repairs.


According to the study, women’s greater involvement in the labor market, together with financial constraints, had a direct effect on the birth rate in 2003.


Of the 48.3 million women in the fertile age bracket (15-49) in 2003, 63% had at least one child. The proportion of women in this age bracket with over three children declined around 1%.


The percentage of adolescents between the ages of 15 and 17 with at least one child fell from 7.2% in 2002 to 6.5% in 2003. In the North and South regions, however, the trend was in the opposite direction.


The greatest increase occurred in the South (25.5%), as against the North’s 13.0%.


Translation: David Silberstein
Agência Brasil

Tags:

  • Show Comments (0)

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

comment *

  • name *

  • email *

  • website *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Ads

You May Also Like

Chemical Industry in Brazil Expects to Grow 19% This Year

Estimates by the Brazilian chemical industry say that industry should post revenues of US$ ...

In Brazil, Teaching the Koran in the Original

In the corridors of the Brazilian Islamic School, in the Vila Carrão neighborhood in ...

Brazil to Replay Its Agricultural Prowess This Year

Brazil’s 2005 agricultural harvest should attain 119.48 million tons, practically the same as in ...

Brazil’s GDP Fall, Worse Than Bad News

The announcement by the Brazil’s statistics bureau, the IBGE, that the Brazilian GDP growth ...

Speak Up, Brazil!

Brazilians will never tolerate a return to dictatorship, unless the U.S.—as it has done ...

Brazil’s Balí© Folclí³rico da Bahia Comes to LA

Brazil’s only professional folk dance company, Balé Folclórico da Bahia, returns to Southern California ...

Tramontina, a Brazilian Company, Revives Cookware Making and a Town in the US

In April 2003, when a major cookware manufacturing facility closed in Manitowoc, Wisconsin, USA, ...

Brazilian Chancellor in Bolivia Talks About Oil and Soy Interests

Brazil’s Minister of Foreign Relations, Celso Amorim, who arrived in Bolivia yesterday, May 21, ...

FIT 0/16: Fashion for the Little Crowd, Brazilian Style

The São Paulo Fashion Week ends this Monday, January 21. But the southeastern Brazilian ...

Despite Iran and Moves by China, Brazil and the US Remain Best Friends Forever

According to Brazilian daily newspaper O Estado de S. Paulo, the Chinese state-run oil ...