• Categories
  • Archives

Brazil: Bureaucracy Is Killing Latin American Trade

A cargo that could reach the Pacific in four days can take as many as 20 days, due to bureaucratic difficulties in Latin American trade, especially with Bolivia.

This information comes from Cloves Vetoratto, the special secretary of Strategic Projects of the Mato Grosso state government, Brazil. “Inter-regional trade suffers from serious obstacles we need to settle,” he said in an interview on Brazil’s National AM Radio.


A seminar was just held in Cuiabá, with the participation of governors from Argentina, Bolivia, Peru, and Chile, in an attempt to formulate a work agenda and a timetable of responsibilities for each of the countries.


A Brazilian delegation including the governor of Mato Grosso, Blairo Maggi, spent 11 days traveling through Bolivia and Peru to gain first-hand knowledge of the problems that Brazilians face in these countries.


According to the secretary, bureaucracy constitutes the biggest obstacle to trade. “We were able to corroborate that crossing the Andes is not difficult; the difficulty is crossing the bureaucracy, the bureaucratic barriers that exist between these countries,” he reports.


Brazil and Bolivia have an agreement eliminating the need to use a passport between the two countries. Nevertheless, “these agreements haven’t been adopted in the field, and passports are still required. These are dozens of hindrances, and at each point it is necessary to present personal and automobile documents,” he says.


The obstacles in one country end up setting off a cascade effect. “If Bolivian customs creates a problem, Brazilian customs goes one better, so we need to sit down and talk,” Vetoratto explains.


Translation: David Silberstein
Agência Brasil

Tags:

  • Show Comments (0)

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

comment *

  • name *

  • email *

  • website *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Ads

You May Also Like

For IMF, Brazil is Reaping Fruits of Discipline

In 2004 there was a marked pickup in activity in most of Latin America, ...

Brazil Calls Bolivia’s Oil Nationalization Unilateral and Unfriendly

With the words, "Considering that, through historical struggles at the cost of much bloodshed, ...

Brazil-US Relations Worsen After Revelations of Washington Spying

The Brazilian government intends to probe telecommunications companies operating in Brazil to find out ...

Criminals Have Already Killed 90 Policemen in São Paulo, This Year

Brazil announced on Tuesday it will create a new police agency, boost surveillance operations ...

Brazil Is Betting Disarming Will Lower the Killing

More than 40,000 people in Brazil are killed each year by firearms. The problem ...

The Plague

It is unacceptable that the "trust no one" policy of the Brazilian government be ...

Latin America’s Largest Dance School Is Brainchild of Brazilian Dreamer

The background noise is the sound of impatient shoes tapping the ground, trying to ...

Rebelo’s Turn

Some have dismissed his initiative as just "the paranoia of the Brazilian left-wingers", but ...

Brazil’s Musical Polyglots

My own vote for the most absurd-sounding cover album ever committed to disc by ...

Brazilian Nattan Pires: a New Star in the World Fashion Constellation

In the competitive world of international fashion, the Brazilian model Nattan Pires has shown ...