Brazil and LatAm Fall Short on Millennium Development Goals

Fifteen out of the 24 Latin American and Caribbean nations, including Brazil, have met Millennium Development goals in reducing malnutrition and hunger, improving access to potable water and gender equality in education.

However, they are behind in reducing absolute poverty, universal access to education and environmental protection.


That is the result of a report on Millennium Development Objectives (MDO) just released by the United Nations and the Latin American Economic Commission (Cepal).


The report shows that the infant mortality rate for children under five years of age in the region was reduced from 56 per 1,000 births in 1990, to 33 per 1,000 births in 2003. The mortality rate for babies of less than one year of age fell from 43 to 25 per 1,000 births during the same period.


With regard to the environment, the report calls the situation “worrisome,” and cites the following problems: loss of natural vegetation and biodiversity, air pollution and the growth of urban slums.


“Economic growth is fundamental if there is to be progress in social policies,” says the executive secretary of Cepal, Alicia Barcea.


She explains that many numbers in the report are only averages due to the differences in the countries surveyed. “However, there is no doubt that growth must include improving income distribution.”


She added that improving social conditions involves investing in infrastructure and a certain amount of social cohesion, along with other factors not included in the MDO, such as jobs and political stability.


The Millennium Development Objectives were adopted in 2000 by the governments of 189 countries, including Brazil.


The signatories are committed to human development around the world and established eight objectives which are to be accomplished by 2015: eradicate absolute poverty and hunger; achieve universal education; promote gender equality and freedom for women; reduce infant mortality; improve maternal healthcare; combat HIV/AIDS, malaria and other diseases; protect the environment through sustainable economic activities and establish a world partnership for development.


ABr – www.radiobras.gov.br

Tags:

  • Show Comments (1)

  • Guest

    important!
    i think that the government needs to take the taxes and use them toward helping to reach brazil’s MDG this might not be so important to u but it is to me because i’m in model un (UNITED NATIONS) hope this changes something for good.

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

comment *

  • name *

  • email *

  • website *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Ads

You May Also Like

Lula and Chavez Disagree on South American Summit. Brazil Position Wins

Latinamerican leaders meeting in Bolivia ended the second summit of the South American community ...

Brazil Will Have By 2013 World’s First Seaweed Biofuel Plant: a US$ 10 Million Project

The first industrial plant in the world capable of getting biofuels from seaweed should ...

Crisis in Brazil: US$ 20 Billion Drop in Investments Means 70,000 Fewer Jobs

It's estimated that Brazil lost the equivalent of US$ 27.8 billion in investments from ...

Despite Last Decade’s Good Ride Competitiveness Cliff Haunts Brazil

As Carnaval in Brazil kicked earlier this month, Brazilians were ready for a party. ...

In Brazil, Rule of Law Is for the Birds

Brazil is a nation suffering from a substantial lack of commitment to the rule ...

Taí­s Araújo is Xica da Silva in Brazilian soap opera

Xica, the Brazilian Slave Who Became Empress, Is Back on US TV

Ten years after becoming a hit in Brazilian TV, the novela (soap opera) Xica ...

Brazilian Police Break Soccer Ring That Was Cheating the IRS

Brazil’s Federal Police have just broken up a soccer corruption ring that illegally raised ...

Brazil’s Largest Port Gets Boost in Exports and Drop in Imports

Cargo activity in the Port of Santos, Brazil, Latin America’s largest port, set a ...

For UN Rapporteur Brazil Needs Affirmative Action to Deal with Marginalization

Racial discrimination is a structural and historical problem in Brazilian society, according to Doudou ...