Ciao, Sí£o Paulo. For Marta, Next Stop Is Paris.

In São Paulo, Brazil, the wooden guy’s in front… no, not John Kerry. As we enter the polling weekend, I’ll do one final entry before the post-election mop-up operation.

Mayor of a World City, pretty significant, huh? 10 million people (18 million, if you include the hinterland) all dependent on services from education and health to public works and rubbish disposal. But wait…


“A Serra election in São Paulo would pave the way for [Geraldo] Alckmin to contend for the presidential nomination for the Social Democracy Party in 2006, said lower house deputy Julio Redecker.”


So that’s what it’s all about, eh? Presidential elections in two years time. The city doesn’t even get a look in. For shame PSDB, for shame. But the petistas can still count on the unions, right?


“A (José) Serra victory may raise concerns that the Workers’ Party is losing strength less than two years after Lula, a former union leader, swept to office with about 60 percent of the vote, said Roberto Soares, a director for the São Paulo Metallurgic Workers’ Union.


Suplicy, 59, who placed second to Serra in the first round vote, created 12 new taxes and began road improvement projects that exacerbated traffic snarls in the city of 12 million people.


“Lula will end up suffering the damage from Suplicy’s lousy administration – it’s a rather strong symbolic defeat for the Workers’ Party,” Soares said in an interview.”


The way the Associated Press’ syndicated article on the Guardian site talks about it, you’d think the São Paulo mayoralty was some kind of runner-up prize for Serra for having lost against Lula in the presidential elections two years ago.


It comes full-circle with the conclusion that even if Lula loses São Paulo this weekend, he’ll still romp home in 2006 as the problem is Marta herself, not the PT itself.


Before Marta throws in the towel and packs her bags for the rumoured diplomatic posting in Paris, though there’s one tiny glimmer of hope in this this Washington Times article article, but not much.


I know if I was Lula, I wouldn’t want an ex-mayor with that level of profile in my party floating around with nothing to do.


Bonne chance, Marta.


For more information and analysis of the São Paulo and other local Brazilian results, visit the election blog being run by Guy Burton and Andrew Stevens at www.saopaulo2004.blogspot.com.

Tags:

Ads

You May Also Like

In Brazil Air Gets Better, But Forest Fires Grow Worse

Brazil’s IBGE (Instituto Brasileiro de Geografia e EstatÀ­stica – Brazilian Institute of Geography and ...

Youngsters from 50 Countries in Brazil for Entrepreneurs Summit

Young entrepreneurs from 50 countries will be in São Paulo, the largest city in ...

How Brazil’s Cardoso Left Marxism, But Not Marx Way of Seeing History

To the many critics in both the ivory tower and the political realm who ...

Brazil Under the Military Kept Argentina’s Bases to Catch Subversives

Argentina's dictatorship, which lasted from 1976 to 1983, held information bases in São Paulo ...

Brazilian Opposition Gets Moral Boost from Chile’s Presidential Election

Conservative businessman, Sebastian Piñera’s victory in Chile as president against a candidate supported by ...

Ecuador Offers Brazil the Pacific In Exchange for the Atlantic

The Ecuadoran Minister of Economy, Rafael Correa, suggested a cooperation agreement in which Brazil ...

Brazil Uses Sports to Promote Changes in the Country

Brazil’s Minister of Sports, Agnelo Queiroz, declared that "The government is using public policy ...

Brazil Cracks Down on Child Porn

Brazil’s subcommission on pedophilia and child pornography at the Secretatiat of Human Rights is drawing ...

In Blood of the Wicked, a Brazilian Cop Turns Out to Be the Good Guy

George Demko, a professor at Dartmouth University, has carved out an interesting niche for ...

Sí£o Paulo (10.9 Million), Rio (6.1) and Salvador (2.9) Brazil’s Biggest Cities

Brazil currently has 189.6 million inhabitants distributed across 5,565 cities and the capital of ...