Brazilian Expert Sees Uncontacted Tribes Disappearing in Three Years

Uncontacted Indian tribe from Peru A Brazilian expert on Amazonian Indians has warned that uncontacted tribes in the most remote parts of the Peruvian Amazon "could disappear within three years," if nothing is done to protect them.

The dire warning was made at an emergency meeting about the tribes by Brazilian indianist José Carlos Meirelles. Meirelles was in a plane earlier this year when iconic photographs of uncontacted Indians were taken, wearing body paint and poised to fire arrows at the intruders.

During the meeting a government spokesman admitted that illegal loggers have invaded the uncontacted Indians' land, and revealed that he knew of 12 illegal logging camps. The admission comes after denials earlier this year that logging was affecting the tribes.

The meeting concluded with a powerful statement denouncing the weakness of the Peruvian government and a long list of demands. These include the removal of loggers who have invaded the Indians' land and the outlawing of "forcing first contact" with them.

"In Peru there is no government institution able to take responsibility for protecting and defending uncontacted tribes," the statement, called the "Declaration of Pucallpa", reads. "Important decisions about these people are taken by ministers, public bodies and companies who agree with the government's policies of resource exploitation."

The meeting was held in Pucallpa, a jungle town in Peru connected to the capital city by a highway that has split one of Peru's uncontacted tribes in two. It was organized by an indigenous federation specially set up to defend uncontacted tribes, CIPIACI, and Brazil's Center for Indigenist Work (CTI).

Survival International's (an organization dedicated to protect tribal peoples human rights) director, Stephen Corry, commented on the subject, "The admission by officials that they know of 12 illegal logging camps in just one of the areas inhabited by uncontacted Indians is startling, particularly after their previous denials that logging was having any impact at all. They must take action now to close them down."

Tags:

  • Show Comments (0)

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

comment *

  • name *

  • email *

  • website *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Ads

You May Also Like

Machinery in Brazilian farm

Favorable Expectations Make Brazil’s Machinery Sector Grow 16%

Brazil's capital goods industry grew 16% in the first two months of this year ...

AA Flies Nonstop from Miami to Belo Horizonte and Salvador in Brazil

Starting in November American Airlines will add three destinations in Brazil to its route ...

Lula or Cardoso? Who’s Brazil’s President?

In all the key policy areas—land reform, environmental protection, affirmative action, and foreign policy—Lula’s ...

Brazil’s Gol to Offer 10 New Daily Flights Between Rio and Sí£o Paulo

Gol Linhas Aereas Inteligentes S.A., Brazil’s low-fare, low-cost airline, announces that the company will ...

We’re Not Shiite, Says Brazil in Refusing US Money

Brazilian officials last week said that the country has refused US$ 40 million in ...

Brazil Expecting 7.18% Growth This Year

The latest weekly market survey by Brazil’s Central Bank shows that the market continues ...

Brazil’s Lula Has Been Calling the Powerful

Brazilian President Lula has asked Bush and other First-World leaders to support changes in ...

Brazil Creates Company Just for Defense and Security Aircraft

Embraer, Brazil’s aircraft maker has just unveiled a new subsidiary that will be focused ...

Honored in Europe Brazil’s Lula Says Too Many Are Paying for Excesses of Very Few

Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva, the president of Brazil, in what seemed very much ...

Blair Calls Lula Once Again to Apologize over Brazilian’s Killing

British Prime Minister Tony Blair telephoned Brazilian President Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva Tuesday ...