Brazil More than Doubles Its Purchases from Arabs

Brazilian port Brazilian-Arab trade has become a two-way street. The Middle East was the region that grew most as a supplier to Brazil this year. According to figures supplied this week by the Ministry of Development, Industry and Foreign Trade, sales by the countries in the bloc to the Brazilian market totaled US$ 5.87 billion from January to November, an increase of 106% over the same period last year.

In November alone, imports of products from the Middle East totaled US$ 429 million, growth of 43.5% over the same month last year. In total, Brazil imported the equivalent to US$ 13.14 billion last year, growth of 9.2% over November 2007.

The expansion of Brazilian imports from the world was boosted by products like ores, chemicals, pharmaceuticals, raw material for agriculture, non-food agricultural products, primary food products, accessories for transport equipment, capital goods and consumer goods.

In the accumulated result for the year, Brazilian imports totaled US$ 161.7 billion, growth of 47% over the first 11 months of last year. There was expressive growth in import of fuels and lubricants, capital goods, raw materials, intermediary products and consumer goods.

With regard to exports, the Middle East also had significant participation as a market. Sales from Brazil to the region totaled US$ 661 million in November, growth of 24.7% when compared to the same month in 2007. The main products shipped were sugar, ores, maize and ironworks products.

Between January and November, sales to the region totaled US$ 7.36 billion, growth of 23.3% over the same period in 2007. Total Brazilian imports reached US$ 184 billion in the accumulated result for the year, growth of 25.7%.

In the month of November alone, sales from Brazil totaled US$ 14.7 billion, 5% more than in the same month of 2007. The Foreign Trade Secretary at the Ministry, Welber Barral, commented that the deceleration of exports in November, when compared to the rest of the year, was furthered by the shutdown of Itajaí­ Port, in Santa Catarina, which was practically destroyed by the strong rains that hit the state in the month of November, by the lower oil prices, and by the reduction in foreign demand, mainly of iron ore.

Anba

Tags:

  • Show Comments (0)

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

comment *

  • name *

  • email *

  • website *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Ads

You May Also Like

Brazil Has Blocked Overseas US$ 300 Million Stolen from the Public Coffers

The Brazilian government hopes to recover around US$ 300 million that were transferred abroad ...

CIV, a Brazilian Glass Powerhouse

The pots, jars, glasses and bowls made by Brazil’s Companhia Industrial de Vidros (CIV) may ...

Constitution gets overhauling again

Would a century be enough for Brazilian congressmen to conclude the debate phase on ...

Brazilian Indian Leaders Go to Brasí­lia Looking for Justice

Four leaders of the Tupinikim and Guarani peoples, who live in the southeastern state ...

Brazil’s Furniture Union Puts 2006 Production on Sale

Unimóveis, the Furniture Worker Union of the Brazilian northern state of Amapá is promoting ...

Brazil and U.S. Committed to Rule of Law

In June of 2003, Brazilian President Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva and U.S. President ...

22 Million Chinese Tourists, 14,000 Visited Brazil. Brazil Wants to Change That.

Brazil’s Minister of Tourism, Walfrido dos Mares Guia, and the ambassador of the People’s ...

Brazil Worried International NGO’s Want to Take Over the Amazon

The 10th National Conference of State Legislatures, which began in Brazil Wednesday, May 17, and ...

U.S. Bishop Deplores Murder of Nun in Brazil

In a letter to Brazil’s ambassador to the United States, the chairman of the ...

US Travel Industry Wants an Easier Way for Brazilians to Visit the US

The U.S. Travel Association has a new plan that it says will create 1.3 ...