Brazil Says WTO Talks Need Obama’s Nod in Order to Succeed

A thoughtful Obama Global trade talks need a strong signal from US President-elect Barack Obama to save them from failure, this according to Brazilian authorities. On Thursday, December 11, Brazilian Foreign Minister Celso Amorim made this comment after meeting with World Trade Organization Director General Pascal Lamy in Geneva.

"Such a move would be justified because a successful Doha round deal at the WTO would offer one solution to the global financial crisis that originated in the United States," said Celso Amorim.

"I think an encouragement from the incoming administration would be a very positive signal and would be probably what we need in this very last stretch," he added.

Calling on Obama to show leadership and not hide behind formalities as the outgoing administration of George W. Bush handles the Doha talks, Amorim said it was up to Washington to show the maximum flexibility to help resolve the crisis.

Leaders of the G20 rich and emerging nations called last month for an outline Doha deal by the end of this year to help counter the financial crisis by warding off protectionism.

Trade ministers came close in July to a deal in the Doha talks, launched in the Qatar capital in late 2001 to free and promote world trade. However the meeting collapsed over differences between the US and India and China over a proposed safeguard to help farmers in poor countries withstand surges in imports.

Despite progress in technical negotiations since then, the safeguard remains a particular stumbling block. So too do proposals to create duty-free zones in industries like chemicals, and the level of trade-distorting US subsidies for cotton.

Lamy is holding intense consultations with ministers from the US and other major trading powers to see if enough progress can be made on these three issues to call ministers to Geneva to seek a breakthrough.

Amorim said that as far as he could judge, Lamy had not yet made up his mind.

WTO spokesman Keith Rockwell said Lamy would decide today, December 12, whether to call a ministerial meeting next week, after a further round of calls with the major players.

But Amorim, one of the keenest proponents of a deal because of Brazil's huge food exports, said not to call a meeting would be just as much a failure as to hold one that then collapsed.

Mercopress

Tags:

Ads

You May Also Like

LETTERS

Brazil—at its current level of almost a trillion reais a year, five thousand reais ...

27% of Brazil’s Youth Do Nothing. They Neither Work Nor Study.

About a quarter of Brazilians in the 15 to 24 age group neither work nor ...

In Brazil, All Is Allowed… After the Elections

There are those in Brazil who believe that the government will propose in November, ...

US and the Rich Urged in Brazil to Cancel Poor Nation’s Debts

The Global Call to Action Against Poverty (GCAP), the biggest ever global mobilization to ...

Brazil’s Big Contractors Looking for a Bigger Slice of Belo Monte’s Action

A sweetheart deal? Maybe. After all, the Brazilian Development Bank (BNDES) will ante up ...

Toil for Tots

Low wages and unemployment are mainstream concerns in Brazilian society but their most painful ...

Bull Times for Brazilian Beef

Revenues from Brazilian beef exports in the month of September reached US$ 241 million, ...

Helping the Helpless in Brazil

If you visit Brazil as a tourist or on business you will get no ...

Brazil Doesn’t See Eye to Eye with Mercosur Junior Members

General Carlos Alvarez, Mercosur's standing secretary, admitted it was difficult for the South American ...

Ted Kennedy to Be Keynote Speaker of First Encounter of Brazilian Leaders in the U.S.

The Brazilian Immigration Center/Massachusetts, with the Brazilian Strategy Network/California and several other activist groups ...