‘Let’s Not Fool Ourselves that We Are Rich,’ Says Brazil

Brazil’s Minister of Foreign Relations, Celso Amorim, demanded the country’s ambassadors to endeavor more to execute the Brazilian government’s foreign policy goals.

Amorim announced that this year the government will continue its efforts on behalf of the global campaign against hunger and poverty, South American integration, and “just” trade relations with developed countries.


The government’s priorities for this year will also include questions linked to the World Trade Organization (WTO) and the reform of the United Nations (UN).


“Some day we hope for UN reform, which is a matter of justice, not simply a reflection of our desire,” the Chancellor argued at the opening of a meeting January 6 with 49 ambassadors who represent Brazil abroad.


Concerning negotiations with the FTAA (Free Trade Area of the Americas) and the European Union, the Chancellor affirmed that they will proceed this year, but he called for patience in turning them into a reality.


“One should not confuse a successful negotiation with a rapid solution, since, rapid solutions often correspond to poor and unsuccessful negotiations. We need to negotiate with full knowledge of Brazil’s needs, as well as self-respect,” Amorim affirmed.


The conclusion of trade negotiations with the two blocs was supposed to occur at the end of last year.


Amorim made it clear that Brazil does not aspire to be a hegemonic country in political and trade spheres but needs to make an effort to continue to grow, even knowing that it will not be a member of the group of rich countries.


“Our Brazil has its role in the world, but we are aware of the difficult situations we face, because ours is a poor country. We can’t fool ourselves into thinking that Brazil will become a member of the group of rich countries, because it is not part of the group of rich countries,” he asserted.


He emphasized that Brazil’s focus will not be limited to a single region but that South American integration remains the priority.


According to the Chancellor, trade with other South American countries has increased around 50% in recent years.


“This represents a meaningful result. I hope that it will continue to be so, but this depends on various factors, such as the global economy, demand, and everyone’s efforts,” he concluded.


Translation: David Silberstein
Agência Brasil

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