• Categories
  • Archives

Open Letter to President Lula in Defense of Cuba’s Prisoners of Conscience

Fidel, Lula and Raul CastroA letter addressed to Brazilian president Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva by the secretary general of Reporters Without Borders (RSF) says that Brazil and the community of Latin American countries are the only ones with the ability to influence the Cuban government’s position on human rights and media freedom.

Cuban dissident Orlando Zapata Tamayo death after 80 days of hunger strike “must have personally affected you as a former government opponent who was a victim of Brazil’s military dictatorship” points out the letter.

“Latin America, which has embarked on the road of unity and regional integration, used to suffer from dictatorships and repression. The Latin American democracies cannot continue to watch this situation drag on in Cuba without reacting. On this sad seventh anniversary of the “Black Spring,” Cuba is no longer a symbol. Cuba is no longer a taboo”, writes Jean Francois Julliard, the organization’s secretary general.
 
Mr. Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva
President of the Federative Republic of Brazil
Planalto Palace, Brasília, D.F.

Dear Mr. President,

Appeals were addressed to you by Cuban dissidents following imprisoned dissident Orlando Zapata Tamayo’s tragic death on 23 February. You were in Havana when Zapata died after more than 80 days on hunger strike. Some people accused you of taking too long to express your regrets at Zapata’s demise.

Your comments nonetheless gave rise to hopes that you could act as a mediator with the Cuban authorities on the question of prisoners of conscience, as shown by the letter from a new Orlando Zapata Committee that the Brazilian embassy in Havana received on March 9.

Reporters Without Borders, an organization that defends press freedom worldwide, supports this initiative and urges you to act on it, despite your reluctance. Brazil and the community of Latin American countries are the only ones with the ability to influence the Cuban government’s position on human rights and media freedom. Zapata’s death personally affected you as a former government opponent who was a victim of Brazil’s military dictatorship.

At the same time, you said you wanted to respect a key principle of Brazilian diplomacy, which is to abstain from any direct interference in another country’s internal affairs. But in what way could reminding the Cuban authorities of fundamental and universal principles – such as the right to express one’s views freely, the right to freedom of movement and the right not to be arrested because of what one says or writes – be regarded as targeted and discriminatory interference?

In the course of a dialogue with Spain, the current holder of the European Union’s rotating presidency, the Cuban authorities subscribed to these principles by signing two United Nations conventions on civil and political rights. But it now refuses to ratify them. Why?

Like us, you rightly condemned the extremely grave human rights violations in Honduras after the June 2009 coup d’état. Brazil even allowed its embassy to be a refuge for the democratically-elected president who was overthrown by force. The Honduran de facto authorities accused you of interference but all you did was take a stand against injustice.

Must it be otherwise for Cuba, where 200 people are in prison solely because they think differently from their leaders? They include 25 journalists, bloggers and intellectuals who are serving long sentences just because they wanted to report the news without being controlled by the government.

One of them is our own correspondent, Ricardo González Alfonso, who was given a 20-year jail sentence during the March 2003 “Black Spring.” How could your government, which defends freedom of expression and access to information for its own citizens, ignore this appeal?

We are aware that Cuba has long been a symbol in Latin America. The 1959 revolution overthrew a dictatorship. For the past 50 years, Cuba has been subjected to an absurd embargo that is unfair for the population but useful to the government.

During a recent visit to Haiti, which owes a lot to the Brazilian presence, we were able to see the real effectiveness of the Cuban medical brigades – a source of national pride – in the assistance they were giving to the victims of the earthquake.

But none of this absolves the Cuban government of the fate it inflicts on its opponents. It does not excuse the brutal treatment and humiliation of journalists, activists, trade unionists and their families. It does not justify the fact that Cubans are unable to access the Internet freely or travel abroad without permission.

But anyone pointing out this other Cuban reality is unfortunately exposed to hate propaganda from those who think they are protecting Cuba’s honour but are in fact just defending a regime that that has run out of arguments.

The future of Cuba and its institutions is a matter for Cubans, but Cuba’s human rights violations concern the international community and the conscience of the world, as they do in any country where these rights are flouted.

To be respected, the Cuban government must be respectable. That is the meaning of the resolution that was adopted by the European Parliament on March 11, in an almost unanimous vote involving all of it political currents.

The need to act is urgent. The journalist Guillermo Fariñas Hernández has begun a hunger strike in Zapata’s memory to press for the release of prisoners of conscience. We urge him to stop but he says he is ready to die. Other dissidents will do the same in the absence of any effort by the Cuban authorities and if the silence from Cuba’s brother countries in Latin America continues.

How does the Cuban government respond to the distress of these people? By persisting in its efforts to smear their reputation. Latin America, which has embarked on the road of unity and regional integration, used to suffer from dictatorships and repression.

The Latin American democracies cannot continue to watch this situation drag on in Cuba without reacting. On this sad seventh anniversary of the “Black Spring,” Cuba is no longer a symbol. Cuba is no longer a taboo.

I thank you in advance for your reply, which I undertake to publish, with your agreement.

Respectfully,
Jean-François Julliard
Reporters Without Borders secretary-general 

Tags:

  • Show Comments (1)

  • Lloyd Cata

    You Need To Wake Up, Peace Does Not Come With Embargos, Occupation, And Accusations Of Terrorism
    President Lula’s response should be the same, “non-interference in the internal affairs of other nations”. If you insist on pursuing the case of Honduras, there is ample evidence that the Honduran president was the victim of an ‘admitted’ coup ‘orchestrated’ by foreign agents of, and associated with, the government of the United States. If that had not been the case then President Lula would not have had the basis for
    ‘interference’. As you say, Latin America ‘should be’ past the time for these activities to occur. As long as this type of threat is evident, such as the other coup of Aristide, in Haiti; also spirited out of the
    country in the middle of the night, then it is certainly legitimate for the entire region to be concerned, and it is legitimate for the region to remain concerned until the repressive nature of this foreign-inspired coup is addressed in Honduras. I don’t think a ‘free press’ has been established there, as you know so well.

    With respect to Cuba, you may persist that there is no longer a need for a revolutionary government in Cuba, but I respectfully disagree. You hail overtures from the Obama government, such as the remittances and relaxed visitation, but you decline to mention that the Obama government still classified Cuba as a terrorist nation. Do you think to insult the dignity of the Cuban Revolution with a few dollars? Do you pretend that you want a relationship based on mutual respect when you still occupy Cuban territory and use that occupied land to illegally, under US law, to torture and deny justice for those imprisoned on Cuban soil, thus tainting the name Guantanemo in the annals of world history? The reason Cuba cannot accede to the wishes of idealists for an end to the revolution, and it consequences, is because the Obama government is not strong enough to end the embargo, and could not even if it wanted to, because the way the American sanctions are written, two-thirds of the Congress must approve. Hello…the American people want to end the embargo, the American businesses wants to end the embargo, the American president wants to remove the embargo, but even if he could that would label him a ‘true’ communist.LOL

    What does that all have to do with Cuban dissidents ‘starving themselves to death’? I am not one to be played the fool, and neither is Mr. Lula. What is the ‘consequences’ of allowing such activity to influence the policy of the state in this situation. Would everyone who wanted to get off the Island simply try to starve themselves to death until the ‘media’ called out their name? We must remember that allowing people to leave was the policy during the Mariel, and it was the United States that negotiated a halt to the Cubans leaving. Understand also that once reaching US shore Cubans are ‘automatically’ regarded as citizens of the US. Be generous in your consideration of what that means with respect to Cuban nationality. No, sir! The threat is still real, the revolution is still real, and the reality that these people are committing suicide by starving themselves to gain media attention and become martyrs to a foreign agenda is regrettable.

    You will make the same arguments when he goes to Iran, Syria, Palestine, and elsewhere. To be sure President Lula is not unaware of the ‘intended’ media storm these ‘suicides’ have produced. His response need only be to the Brazilian people, because until you ask Mr. Obama to account for the political prisoners in the US, and have adequate response, then to press Mr. Lula for a response to 2 Cuban suicides is hypocrisy, but that is between Reporters Without Borders and Mr. Lula. Good Luck.

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

comment *

  • name *

  • email *

  • website *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Ads

You May Also Like

Brazil Slashes 30% from 2016 Olympic Games Expenses

The organizers of Brazil’s Rio 2016 Olympic and Paralympic Games are making cutbacks of ...

The King of the River

CDs or Books by Keyword, Title or Author By Hélio Pólvora À memória de ...

Brazil Exports Grow to Record US$ 137 Billion, 16.2% More than in 2005

Brazil’s trade balance had its second best monthly performance in 2006 in December, which ...

Bolivia nationalized oil and gas operations

Brazil Caves in to Bolivia and Brazilians Feel It in Their Pockets

Brazil will pay about 11% more for natural gas from Bolivia under a deal ...

Brazil Has Best Month for Jobs in Six Years

The creation of 229,757 formal economy, on-the-books, jobs in August was the best result ...

Brazilian Gets Hollywood’s Women in Film Filmmaker Grant

Winners of the WIF Latina New Filmmaker Grant, announced in February by Women In ...

Can El País Bring Journalism Back to the Brazilian Press?

The arrival of the Portuguese version of the daily El País in Brazil, comes ...

Brazil: Brasí­lia Declaration Full Text

By invitation of Mr. Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva, President of the Federative Republic ...

Brazilian Troops Keep an Eye on Haitian Elections

Exactly two years after former president, Jean Bertrand Aristide, fled the country, Haiti will ...

Brazil Ready to Produce Bird Flu Vaccine in Two Months

Isaias Raw, president of the Butantã Institute, in São Paulo, informed that within 60 ...