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Brazil to Vote Against Iran Sanctions. Vote that Matters Though Will Come from Big 5

UN Security Council meetingIran’s president, Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, indirectly rebutted pressure by the international community on his country because of suspicions regarding the aims of his nuclear program. According to the official Iranian news agency, Irna, Ahmadinejad declared that “world disputes,” which are part of “global arrogance,” interfere with regional development efforts.

Iran, he said, would fight to protect its culture and values. “The Iranian nation is destined to attain great achievements and high levels of development while preserving our own culture far from the Western way of life,” said the president. “The bet that global arrogance is making is that they can dominate the world by disseminating discord among nations.”

At the same time, the president of the Iranian parliament, Ali Larijani, criticized international pressure in favor of sanctions against Iran. The movement, he said, was led by the Barack Obama administration in the United States. “The language of sanctions and resolutions is not appropriate for a dialogue and interaction with the Republic of Iran,” he declared.

Brazil’s position is against sanctions. The Brazilian Foreign minister, Celso Amorim, has just traveled to Istanbul, Moscow and Tehran as part of a diplomatic effort before the official visit by president Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva to Tehran on May 15.

Amorim’s objective was to gather support for further negotiations. He was partially successful: Turkey is with Brazil against sanctions; Russia is in favor of something called “intelligent sanctions.”

Meanwhile, behind the scenes at the United Nations there is enormous pressure from the US and Europe for more sanctions against Tehran. There have already been three rounds of sanctions and its controversial nuclear program.

The issue is expected to come to a vote in the UN Security Council in May. As Brazil and Turkey are rotating members of the Security Council at the moment, there will not be a unanimous vote in favor of sanctions.

However, the question, as always in the UN Security Council, is what the voters with vetoes will do. The US, France and England are in favor; Russia in favor of “intelligent sanctions.” China will probably never vote in favor of any sanctions, but may be persuaded to abstain.

Twenty percent of China’s petroleum comes from Iran so much of the behind the scenes maneuvering has involved getting oil tankers from places like Saudi Arabia to China to ensure there is no shortfall in the world’s fastest growing economy.

Thus, because of all the horse trading required, even if sanctions are approved they may be watered down sanctions; they may well be what Brazil has been saying sanctions always tend to be: dumb sanctions that never harm the people and institutions they are supposed to, but rather the more vulnerable general population.

ABr

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  • Show Comments (14)

  • enrique villegas

    Iranian Sanctions
    Brazil Has every right to make up it’s own mind.Some Countries are allowed to make mistakes like invading a Country(Iraq), that had no weapons of mass destruction.In the United States(ONE)man decided to to invade Iraq.That (ONE) man that invaded the wrong Country(IRAQ) left office in 2008 with a economic crisis.GEORGE W. BUSH ……And many Americans don’t have jobs because of (ONE) man’s mistake!!!!!!!!!!!!

  • FloresLucia

    respond
    Cars and houses are expensive and not everybody can buy it. However, loans are invented to support different people in such cases.

  • Starker

    Frazine
    Be sure that most of iranian people are for democracy and for the green movment and they are against this islamic gvt dictaor

    I have made this point several times on this board, having followed the student movement for years. Best of luck ridding yourselves of the mullahs.

  • frazine

    huge political error
    I am writing you from Iran ,That is a very big political error from President Lula to support a extrem right gvt as Ahmadinegad .

    Be sure that most of iranian people are for democracy and for the green movment and they are against this islamic gvt dictaor .Most of the iranian left party as Parti tudeh or fedayens Iran are against Ahmadinejad .
    Most of the iranian workers organisation are against this religious gvt and Brezil support it !!!!

  • Tiger

    Lula gets less press, and looks less like a strong independent man, if Brazil votes for sanctions. As he nears the end of his term, his image is even more important to him and supporters, who are arleady to construct Lula- the myth (look at the recent film about his life, financed by those doing business with his government and containing lots of inaccuracies). I bet he envites Chavez and Castro.

  • Lloyd Cata

    Second Class Markets
    Since the beginning of ‘merchant’ societies, or mercantilism, there has been recognition that in the ‘secondary economies’ lies the greatest potential for ‘growth’. Becoming a catalyst for that growth is in the best interests of both Brazil, as a ‘net’ exporter, and to the growth of the world economy.

    There will certainly be economic repercussions from some long entrenched market forces in these underdeveloped areas. New agreements with second-class economies threaten historic means of commerce. We see this clearly in the formation of such organizations such as IBSA, with the trade agreements between India, Brazil, and South Africa. The Empire must address these new market forces once it recovers from its own economic devastation. The Honduran solution, so effective throughout Africa, has had unintended consequences and must be refined before the Empire can proceed to address Brazilian, and indeed BRIC bilateral agreements and markets.

  • Lloyd Cata

    Luigi Vercotti
    [b]Why wouldn’t Petrobras invest in another refinery IN BRASIL? [/b]

    Refinery capacity in Brazil is not a pressing issue due to its bio-fuel resources. Note that Venezuela does have refineries and capacity, it does not need foreign refineries for energy products. Thus the Empires efforts to originally break the Venezuelan oil industry, that ultimately failed. Even after nationalization US companies continue to engage in oil recovery efforts in Venezuela. Sanctions are for those unable to defend themselves against such tactics.

    Iran does not even have the oil infrastructure of Iraq. Iraq also was, and is, another major oil producer without refinery capacity. Poor Nigeria, Africa’s largest economy, has little refinery capacity. Am I to presume this is an error or oversight on the part of “some people” at the expense of other societies. Am I to presume that of all the hundreds of billions of dollars delivered to the hands of tyrants, dictators, and potentates there was no imagination to build refinery capacity in these societies?

    No sir, my imagination, such as it is, is aligned with the truth, aligned with the facts, and consistent with my support for Brazilian investment in Iran. But…but…for those who still support Cuban sanctions and embargoes after 50 years…

  • marek s.

    lula,s ego
    Lula will do a lot to show he will not follow US or EU.
    He says with much pride that Brazil,s biggest trading partner
    is not US nor EU anymore but China.
    You are looking for logic where there isn,t much to be found.

  • fried CHC

    Luigi Vercotti – A$$HOLE O MIO
    If I was Picasso dazzling you with daring color and stylish innovation, You’d be the monkey throwing paint pots at the canvas.

    Hehehe

    Costinha
    😉

  • Luigi Vercotti

    PetrobrASS
    Cata, I’m sure you love to hear yourself speak and read what you write, so answer a simple question: Why wouldn’t Petrobras invest in another refinery IN BRASIL?

    Brazil paints itself as such a complete international whore, doing business only in places where the first world won’t. Iran? Lula couldn’t pick a worse friend. Good thing nobody takes Brasil seriously or even a jackass like Obama would pick up the phone and remind Lula where his place at the table is. (He sits with the kids).

  • Andrade

    [quote]Try another tack, sir, because this one simply will not stick.[/quote]

    Waste of time asking him to try another tack. One cant argue with illogical folks.;-)

  • Andrade

    [quote]Most Iranians would likely approve of sanctions if it brought an end to this illegitimate regime. [/quote]

    Like most Iraqis are very happy about the regime change the west brought about on them? Grow up, dude. The Brazilian government doesn’t give a shit about your constant rant against the Iranians. For that matter the U.S. government doesn’t give a rat ass either about your “expertise” on Geopolitics.

  • Lloyd Cata

    Paul Wilson
    [b]While Brazil has been unwilling to oppose Iran because Petrobras has over $2 billion in investments there, the US and other nations have been tailoring specific sanctions that will have most affect on the income and investments of the Revolutionary Guard, and are not designed to harm ordinary Iranians.[/b]

    Sir, your constant reference to the Petrobras investment in Iran is particularly interesting given your claimed desire not to impact the general Iranian population. Perhaps you should frame your objection differently since the Petrobras investment is for a ‘petroleum refinery’. I am sure you frame of reference for this deal is ‘anything that helps run the regime is fair game’, with no concern whether Iran’s production of gasoline would help the people and stabilize the society. Perhaps you should do further research into ‘why’ Iran has the oil surplus, has markets for that surplus, yet in all the years of dictatorship and Western influence there were no refinery capacity built into the Iranian infrastructure? Indeed there has been a ‘pattern’ of this lack of petroleum refinery in oil source nations. Why in all the years of petroleum profits do these nations lack the ability to refine their own gasoline? In fact, the reason the US cannot allow Venezuela to continue on an independent path is because it does have refineries. Of course that does not help in the production of electricity because that is another area that has been neglected in the extraction of resources from developing states. The economic and trade aspect to the Petrobras deal have nothing to do with Iran’s nuclear program, and without it the Iranian people are subject to Western influence to ‘turn off the gas’ for every Iranian.

    Brazil understands that it also may be subject to the same dictates that the West would like to impose on Iran, and Brazil is clearly not going to accept foreign influence in its own nuclear ambitions or possibilities. As you so clearly see, Brazil did not offer to give the US its own stockpile of ‘highly enriched uranium’ at the recent nuclear summit.

    The ‘only’ rogue nuclear power in the world is presently Israel. The capabilities or lack thereof of Iran, and also North Korea, can be fairly ascertained by the, although imprecise, credible inspections by the IAEA. By giving Israel the ‘democratic’ label, placing it in the cradle of Western ideology, a cloak is placed on its nuclear prowess and ambitions. How long can the West maintain this double-speak and threaten the future of those who will not conform to such hypocrisy?

    If Washington is unable to influence its ‘democratic’ friend to reveal it nuclear forces and ambitions, there is no need to harass others who have already given their allegiance to non-proliferation. Specifically, since the world knows that Israel was in cooperation with the former apartheid regime in South Africa to circumvent the proliferation protocols.

    You may find comfort in your ‘condemnation’ of Brazil’s behavior in this area, but perhaps you should look closer to home before exposing yourself to the facts of the relationship between Brazil and Iran. The US-Israeli relationship has more to do with the instability of the region than all the other actors. The recent Pentagon analysis of the Israeli posture as detrimental to US interests could not have been clearer, although cloaked in the diplomacy of military subservience to civilian rule.

    Petrobras’ investment in Iran has nothing to do with Iran’s nuclear ambitions, and you know it. In fact it could be considered a ‘humanitarian’ gesture given the lack of gasoline experienced by ‘ordinary’ Iranians. Try another tack, sir, because this one simply will not stick. Remember, always, how the smartest and most clever in your society have led the world to unjust war, unjust financial hardship, and now unjust ecological destruction.

  • Paul Wilson

    [quote] if sanctions are approved they may be watered down sanctions; they may well be what Brazil has been saying sanctions always tend to be: dumb sanctions that never harm the people and institutions they are supposed to, but rather the more vulnerable general population.[/quote]

    While Brazil has been unwilling to oppose Iran because Petrobras has over $2 billion in investments there, the US and other nations have been tailoring specific sanctions that will have most affect on the income and investments of the Revolutionary Guard, and are not designed to harm ordinary Iranians. You make no mention of this, nor mention of how Petrobras is one of the few remaining international corporations willing to invest in Iran. Big profits are motivating Brazils position on Iran, not concern for the average Iranians who currently being arrested, tortured and sentenced to death by hanging for peacefully protesting against this brutal regime and the rigged elections. You fail to mention this. Most Iranians would likely approve of sanctions if it brought an end to this illegitimate regime.

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