Brazil to Use Kyoto Protocol to Sell Pollution Credit

The Kyoto Protocol was signed eight years ago in Japan. The international treaty, aimed at reducing greenhouse gas emissions, goes into effect today, without the adhesion of the United States and Australia.

The rich countries that adhered to the treaty are expected to reduce their polluting gas emissions 5%, relative to 1990. They have until 2008-2012 to comply with this regulation.


According to Brazil’s Ministry of Science and Technology’s chief coordinator of Research in Global Changes, José Miguel, not much will change in Brazil, since this process has been underway for several years.


“What will happen here is that more companies and projects will seek governmental approval for authorization in the category of clean development mechanisms, the so-called MDL’s.”


Miguéz recalled Brazil’s pioneering effort when it comes to the Protocol.


“The first project approved by the UN’s clean development mechanisms was a Brazilian project in a sanitary landfill in the city of Nova Iguaçu, in the state of Rio de Janeiro. This year we are hoping for the approval of 30 more projects,” he stated.


He pointed out that, besides the aspect of attracting funds, these projects can bring Brazil improved sanitary and health conditions.


“MDL projects can make possible changes in people’s living standards, job creation, and in power generation, through the use of renewable energy sources. In 21 years each project could reduce emissions by 14 million tons.” he said.


Brazil may earn boodles of money from the Kyoto Protocol, according to Miguêz. “The accord envisions the sale of carbon gas credits. Through this, Brazil gains in every way.”


Developed countries, which emit a lot of carbon dioxide, can purchase credits from developing countries, thus obtaining the right to emit these gases for a longer period of time.


Studies conducted by the Getúlio Vargas Foundation (FGV) show that this market has an annual business potential of US$ 3.5 billion in Latin America and that a big share of this potential has to do with projects in Brazil.


Translation: David Silberstein
Agência Brasil

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  • Guest

    A project
    dsmccafferty@dundee.ac.uk

    Hi.I am currently working a of university project on reasons why certain countries could of been exempt from the Kyoto Protocol.
    While it seems that Brazil is following this protocol, and already has a substatial amount of clean energy resources. Would you be able to provide me with more information on why Brazil may of had the possibility to not to follow the protocol?

    Daniel McCafferty

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