• Categories
  • Archives

Brazil Drafting Forest Peoples to Protect Environment

Brazil’s traditional populations – Indians, descendants of runaway slaves, traditional fishermen, peasants, and communities engaged in extractive activities – are important allies in the fight to preserve the Brazilian environment.

This realization stemmed from a debate on environmental management, in Santarém, capital of Pará state, on the second day of the National Seminar to Evaluate the Pilot Program for the Protection of Tropical Forests in Brazil (PPG7). The PPG7 was created in 1992, but its implementation only commenced in 1995.


“When there are traditional inhabitants in conservation units, the protection of nature becomes effective,” declared Leonel Teixeira, who represented the Ministry of Environment (MMA) in the thematic discussion on Territorial Organization and Environmental Management.


This perspective was reinforced by Magaly Medeiros, representative of the Secretariat of Environment of the State of Acre, who affirmed: “It is the resident population that keeps the forest standing,”


It is Acre itself that provides the example to which Teixeira was referring: the struggle by the National Council of Latex Gatherers (CNS) for the creation of the first extractive reserves.


The conservationists’ big taboo, making forest preservation contingent upon the absence of human beings – the mentality behind the establishment of the first conservation units -, began to be overturned.


With the law that instituted the National System of Conservation Units (SNUC) in 2000, the units were divided into two categories: integral protection (which does permit permanent residents) and sustainable use (which permits the existence of inhabitants in the area).


Paulo Autiere, representative of the Secretariat of Environment of the State of Pará, informed that, when the process of eco-economic macro-zoning began in the state in 1988, 1.23% of the state’s 1,247,689 square kilometers were integral protection conservation units.


“We were hoping to attain 10%, but we have only 4.38% at present. On the other hand, the sustainable use units expanded beyond our expectations. They represented 10% and were supposed to reach 16%, but now they form 27% of Pará,” he revealed.


A proof of the growing recognition of the role of local residents in environmental management.


“Our main challenge is to adapt government policy to the diversity of cultures and landscapes in the Amazon region,” Teixeira observed.


Hanz Krueger, representative of the multilateral agency, German Technical Cooperation (GTZ), pointed to deficiencies in socio-economic data as a barrier to be overcome in meeting this challenge.


“Nowadays there are abundant data for the analysis of physical space, good studies based on satellite images and good technological equipment. But satellites don’t reveal people’s heads and the dynamics of social processes,” he joked.


The Pilot Program is coordinated by the MMA’s Secretariat of Amazon Coordination. The program, which is an offspring of the United Nations Conference on Environment and Development (Rio-92), represents a multilateral cooperation initiative to test and develop innovative strategies for the protection and sustainable use of Brazil’s tropical forests.


Since its inception, it has invested US$ 400 million on projects in the Amazon and the Atlantic Rain Forest.


The funds come from Germany, the European Union, the United Kingdom, the United States, the Netherlands, Japan, France, and Canada and are channeled through a Tropical Forests Fiduciary Fund administered by the World Bank.


ABr – www.radiobras.gov.br

Tags:

  • Show Comments (1)

  • Guest

    ME
    I WISH THAT YOU GOT RIGHT TO THE POINT WHEN YOU ASK FOR SOMETHING

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

comment *

  • name *

  • email *

  • website *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Ads

You May Also Like

Brazil Opens Agroecology School with Venezuelan Help

Establishing an exchange network among peasant farmers throughout Latin America is one of the ...

International Forum on Architecture and Construction, in the city of São Paulo, Brazil

World’s Tallest Building Engineer Praises Brazilian Design

Brazil has potential to export goods and services in the area of construction to ...

Cheers to Lula and His ‘Left Wing of the Possible’ in Brazil

It is more than appropriate that ORIT (Workers’ Interamerican Regional Organization) is holding its ...

Brazil Ventures into Space with a Little Help from Russia, China and France

In 2006 Marcos Pontes, a Lieutenant Colonel in the Brazilian Air Force, became the ...

In Brazil, Only 41% of Youngsters 15 to 17 Attend School

Representatives of the 34 member countries of the Organization of American States (OAS), international ...

Profit Takers and Oil Price Depress Brazilian Stocks

Latin American and Brazilian stocks in particular tumbled, as the recent surge in oil ...

Despite Unemployment 3 Million Children Work in Brazil

It is estimated that worldwide over two hundred million children and youths work when ...

Cover Story

The epic of Palmares — a state founded in the 17th century by runaway ...

More Brazilian Indians Looking for Basic Schooling

Registration of indigenous students for elementary school has increased in the last three years, ...

Brazil Expecting Half-Percentage Cut in Key Interest Rate

The Brazilian Central Bank’s Monetary Policy Council (Copom) begins its first meeting of 2006 ...