• Categories
  • Archives

Four Brazilian Indians Nominated for Nobel Peace Prize

Amongst the 52 Brazilian women nominated for the “1000 Women For the Nobel Peace Prize 2005” Project, four indigenous women were included: Maninha Xukuru-Kariri, Joênia Batista de Carvalho, Zenilda Xukuru and Eliane Potiguara.

Ever since the Nobel Peace Prize was created, in 1901, only 12 women have received the award. The project aims to get recognition for women who have, in various fields, fought for peace.


In Brazil, the Program Committee received 262 suggestions. Based on the history, the vision, the working method and the strategies reported by each of the 1000 women who have been selected from 150 countries, a book will be published.


Nominees include Joênia Batista de Carvalho of the Wapichana people. She lives in Roraima, and is a lawyer working with the Indigenous Council of Roraima (CIR).


Another nominee is Maninha Xukuru-Kariri, who has been part of the Association of Indigenous Peoples of the Northeast, Minas Gerais and Espí­rito Santo (Apoinme) since it was set up 15 years ago. She was the first woman to be part of the institution’s coordinating body.


“Society tries to deny its indigenous origins. They have taken our lands, our languages and our beliefs. Today, we know who we are, what our rights are and our position in history,” she says.


Zenilda Maria de Araújo, of the Xukuru people, who lives in Pernambuco, has, for two decades, participated in her people’s fight for land. Nowadays, the Xukuru possess more than 70% of their territory, but still live under constant threat from the ranchers in the region.


“Women have participated in all aspects of community life: in the fields, at home, in education, in health, in the struggles. We are on the front line in the struggles, together with the men. When we start to reflect on our struggles, we find more courage to continue the fight,” she says.


Eliane Potiguara was born in 1950 and, according to the information supplied by the 1000 Women Project, she is a writer and was founder of the Indigenous Education Women’s Group, which today is called the Indigenous Communications Network.


Cimi – Indianist Missionary Council – www.cimi.org.br

Tags:

  • Show Comments (0)

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

comment *

  • name *

  • email *

  • website *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Ads

You May Also Like

Unemployment Is Up in Brazil

After falling for three consecutive months, Brazil’s unemployment rate rose slightly to 11.4% in ...

Brazil Ready to Send Cancer Experts to Venezuela to Help Chavez

Dilma Rousseff, the president of Brazil, who had her own battle against cancer, offered ...

Brazil’s Petrobras Goes for Risky Gamble in Deep Turkey Seas

Brazil’s state-owned oil company Petrobras announced that it will soon be operating in Turkey ...

Brazil Prepares Big Self Promotion Campaign in the US

The XXIII Plenary Meeting of the Brazil-United States Entrepreneurial Council got underway yesterday in ...

A Casualty of Brazil’s Defeat, Roberto Carlos, 33, Announces Retirement

Brazil defender Roberto Carlos has announced he is retiring from international football, after his ...

It’s Official: Brazil Won’t Renew IMF Accord

Brazil’s Minister of Finance, Antônio Palocci, informed the International Monetary Fund (IMF) that Brazil ...

Brazilians Living Abroad Elect 16 of Their Own to Represent Them

Brazilian expats living in several countries around the world participated in elections to choose ...

Brazil and Korea Study Renewable Energy Sources

Korea Electric Power Corporation (Kepco), a Korean state-owned company and Brazil’s Eletrobrás – Centrais ...

Brazil’s Emissary of Samba

Samba brings instantaneous images of Rio’s world-famous Carnaval, of fabulously decorated floats, enormous drum ...

Brazilian Dies While Being Held by US Immigration Agents

US-resident Brazilian Irene Araújo had a little problem earlier this week. She was worried ...