• Categories
  • Archives

Four Brazilian Indians Nominated for Nobel Peace Prize

Amongst the 52 Brazilian women nominated for the “1000 Women For the Nobel Peace Prize 2005” Project, four indigenous women were included: Maninha Xukuru-Kariri, Joênia Batista de Carvalho, Zenilda Xukuru and Eliane Potiguara.

Ever since the Nobel Peace Prize was created, in 1901, only 12 women have received the award. The project aims to get recognition for women who have, in various fields, fought for peace.


In Brazil, the Program Committee received 262 suggestions. Based on the history, the vision, the working method and the strategies reported by each of the 1000 women who have been selected from 150 countries, a book will be published.


Nominees include Joênia Batista de Carvalho of the Wapichana people. She lives in Roraima, and is a lawyer working with the Indigenous Council of Roraima (CIR).


Another nominee is Maninha Xukuru-Kariri, who has been part of the Association of Indigenous Peoples of the Northeast, Minas Gerais and Espí­rito Santo (Apoinme) since it was set up 15 years ago. She was the first woman to be part of the institution’s coordinating body.


“Society tries to deny its indigenous origins. They have taken our lands, our languages and our beliefs. Today, we know who we are, what our rights are and our position in history,” she says.


Zenilda Maria de Araújo, of the Xukuru people, who lives in Pernambuco, has, for two decades, participated in her people’s fight for land. Nowadays, the Xukuru possess more than 70% of their territory, but still live under constant threat from the ranchers in the region.


“Women have participated in all aspects of community life: in the fields, at home, in education, in health, in the struggles. We are on the front line in the struggles, together with the men. When we start to reflect on our struggles, we find more courage to continue the fight,” she says.


Eliane Potiguara was born in 1950 and, according to the information supplied by the 1000 Women Project, she is a writer and was founder of the Indigenous Education Women’s Group, which today is called the Indigenous Communications Network.


Cimi – Indianist Missionary Council – www.cimi.org.br

Tags:

  • Show Comments (0)

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

comment *

  • name *

  • email *

  • website *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Ads

You May Also Like

On Honduras Brazil and US Want Micheletti to Resign and Zelaya to Be Free to Go

Brazil and the United States seem to agree that ousted Honduran president Manuel Zelaya ...

Lula’s Last Appeal: When You Vote for Dilma You Vote for Me

Brazilian president Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva called on fellow Brazilians to vote for ...

RAPIDINHAS

The first thing that strikes you in Rio is the color, masses of it ...

Brazil’s Lula Tells Bush G8 Needs to Lead Stalled WTO Talks

President Bush and Brazilian President Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva have agreed to continue ...

Brazil Opens Doors to Haitians, But Only 100 a Month Will Be Able to Enter

Brazil will have to rethink its immigration policy due to the economic impact generated ...

Latin America Needs Brazilian Help to Fight AIDS

Brazil will help other Latin American and Caribbean countries fulfill their goals for HIV/AIDS ...

White Lie: Poverty in Brazil Has No Color

A little more than a century after the abolition of black slavery in the ...

Brazil Heads CIAT, World Body Reuniting Tax Offices from Americas and EU

The Secretary of Brazil’s Federal Revenue and Customs Secretariat, Jorge Rachid, starting Wednesday, April ...

Brazil Finds Huge Gas Field Enough to Supply 30% of Country’s Demand

Brazil’s oil and gas company OGX informed the press that a new onshore field ...

Brazil Sends 3 Ministers, Pelí© and Paulo Coelho to Davos

The World Economic Forum got started today in Davos, Switzerland. The theme of this ...