• Categories
  • Archives

Experts Discuss in Brazil Global Good-Food Code

Expanding food access, improving product quality, and giving greater transparency to information on all stages of production are the challenges facing the 1st World Congress on Food Security, which began yesterday, July 11, in downtown São Paulo.

Government and private sector representatives from every continent are gathering for the first time to discuss the chief links involved in the food chain, from the use of rations and additives to the information needed by consumers.


The event represents the first step in an attempt to implement on a global scale the Code of Good Manufacturing Practices, approved last year in Denmark.


The encounter is sponsored by the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), together with the International Feed Industry Federation (IFIF) and the National Feed Industry Syndicate (Sindirações).


According to the president of the Syndicate, Mário Sérgio Cutait, one of the norms established in the code is to guarantee consumer access to information on the origin of butchered animals, the quality of the meat, and the means used to conserve it.


In this regard, Cutait points out, the requirement to include this information on product labels becomes “essential.” As for the prospects of universal adoption of the code, he observes that Brazil acted early and formulated a similar set of rules in 2000.


The secretary of Agricultural Policy of the Ministry of Agriculture, Livestock, and Supply, Ivan Wedekin, participated in the opening of the Congress.


He stressed the federal government’s intention to encourage the expansion of meat exports, as well as to promote a greater number of coordinated efforts by the sector to further this goal.


With respect to agricultural and livestock subsidies granted by governments of other countries, Wedekin said “that the country hopes the rich nations are well-disposed to open their markets.”


He mentioned the percentage levels of subsidies in the chief production areas, such as the United States (17%), Europe (36%), and Japan (50%), in comparison with Brazil’s (3%).


The 1st World Congress on Food Security ends tomorrow, July 13. The largest delegation is from the United States, followed by the ones from China, India, Nigeria, and the United Kingdom.


ABr – www.radiobras.gov.br

Tags:

  • Show Comments (0)

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

comment *

  • name *

  • email *

  • website *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Ads

You May Also Like

RAPIDINHAS

When he was first elected in 1994, president Cardoso promised a sweeping political reform, ...

Brazil’s Oscar Nominee Is Rags to Riches Tale

The film Dois Filhos de Francisco (Francisco’s Two Sons), directed by Breno Silveira, will ...

Brazilian Congress Deals with Two Conflicting Bills on Online Defamation

A law proposed by a Brazilian senator to increase by one third prison sentences ...

Brazil Gets Its First Official Koran Translation

The Arab-Brazilian Chamber of Commerce is launching a Portuguese edition of the Koran, the ...

Echoing Beneath the Fingers

The speech in its entirety, in Portuguese:By Brazzil Magazine Inside the old Helms Bakery ...

Buenos Aires Declaration Decries Violence Against Children in Latin America

The family and State institutions are the main settings where Latin American children and ...

Lula Renews Appeal to Save Brazilian from Firing Squad in Indonesia

Brazilian President Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva ordered on Friday, February 10, that "additional ...

Brazil Tragedy: Rio Ready to Remove Favelas Residents by Force if Necessary

After Rio’s tragedy, with over 223 confirmed deaths, 140 of them in Niterói, the ...

Export Council Brings Boost to Brazilian Sales Overseas

Exports from the state of Mato Grosso reached US$ 3.813 billion, between January and ...

Will Brazil’s Sarney Fall on His Sword?

The Senate chairman, José Sarney, is following in the tradition of his predecessors and ...