Brazil’s Lula Wants Urgent ‘Democratization’ of the UN

Brazilian President Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva said that the participation of developing countries as permanent members of the United Nations (UN) Security Council is “non-postponable.”

At a luncheon offered in the Itamaraty Palace to the visiting delegation from Gambia, Lula thanked the president of that country, Yahya Jammeh, for his efforts to establish a “convergence” between the proposals defended by the G4 (the group formed by Brazil, Germany, India, and Japan) and the African Union with regard to UN reform.


The two groups want the UN Security Council to be expanded, but they disagree over how many permanent members should have veto rights in the organ.


According to the G4 proposal, Africa would receive two permanent seats on the Council without veto rights and one temporary seat. The African Union, on the other hand, is seeking two permanent seats with veto rights and two temporary seats for African representatives.


The G4 wants the total number of Security Council seats to be increased from 15 to 25. Six of the new members would occupy permanent seats – one for a country of the Americas, one for Europe, and two each for Asia and Africa.


Lula also remarked that the approximation between Brazil and Gambia is “necessary” for the two countries not to miss out on the historic opportunity to strengthen and democratize the United Nations.


“This is the only way we can prepare multilateralism to respond to the demands of a world marked by unequal globalization, the arms race, and the incitation of intolerance,” he observed.


The president of Gambia, Yahya Jammeh, reassured President Lula that his government stands “firmly” behind the aspirations of Brazil and the other G4 countries to reform the United Nations.


Jammeh insisted that, now more than ever, the countries of the South have “better possibilities” of contributing to the reform of the global system.


The Security Council is the UN organ that discusses and decides on matters related to armed conflicts and security around the world. Currently, only the five permanent members – China, the United States, France, the United Kingdom, and Russia – have voting and veto rights on the Council.


Agência Brasil

Tags:

Ads

You May Also Like

Stage Struck III

By Brazzil Magazine Continued from our last issue THE CENTRAL CHARACTERS OF BRAZILIAN THEATER ...

Time for Reform

Immobilism and stalemate are inappropriate terms to describe Brazilian politics today. The political process ...

A soldier from Brazil's National Security Force

Pan American Games in Brazil Will Count on 7,800 Federal Troops

Brazil's Ministry of Tourism is going to invest US$ 83.8 million in the Pan ...

Making Do

New official statistics show that the subterranean economy in Brazil employs one in every ...

Brazil on Mercosur Summit: ‘Total Agreement Only in the Cemetery’

Brazilian Minister of Foreign Relations, Celso Amorim made a positive assessment of the Mercosur ...

Brazil Tells World ‘Keep Off, the Amazon Is Ours’

Nelson Jobim, the Brazilian Defense Minister stated that the Brazil's Amazon sovereignty is non ...

Brazilian Ministers to Receive Saudi Executives Visiting Brazil

The executives of three major Saudi companies, who are travelling throughout Brazil, will be ...

Brazil Uses Public Bonds to Fund US$ 6 Billion Sovereign Fund

Brazil's Sovereign Fund (FSB) should be established, initially, using money from public bonds to ...

Brazil Gets Lowest Inflow of Dollars Since 2008

Brazil started the year with US$ 84 million greater outflow than inflow of dollars ...

U.S.A. Calendar

FRIDAY 1 HOLLYWOOD, FLOR. 9:00 PM – Clauduarte Sá at Brazil Samba Café LOS ...