Political Reform Will Not End Corruption in Brazil

The political reform under consideration in the Brazilian Chamber of Deputies will not be able to solve the structural problems of Brazil’s political systems by itself.

In the opinion of the president of the Brazilian Political Science Association, Maria Hermí­nia Tavares de Almeida, changes in the political system are insufficient for the country to overcome this problem.


“I don’t believe in the existence of political reforms that will resolve this, because political systems face specific problems at specific times,” she said.


Almeida observed that the reform will be incapable of diminishing corruption in the political system as it is currently constituted.


“I don’t believe that public campaign financing will resolve the corruption issue. What can minimize this problem are combinations of instruments, ranging from those associated with an observant press and observant society to those that have to do with the Federal Police, the Federal Revenue agency, and things of that sort,” she affirmed.


The political scientist pointed out, nonetheless, that the reform can signify the start of changes in the electoral system. She criticized, however, what she refers to as the “purification” of the political reform being discussed in the Chamber.


“The reform started out in the decade of the 1990’s as a major reform that would transform presidential into parliamentary government and change the electoral system, and what is left now is a minimal agenda,” she said.


She admitted that, in its current version, the political reform has a better chance of being approved by the legislators. “It is more probable that this reform will be approved than one that changes everything,” she remarked.


In Almeida’s opinion, there is no such thing as political systems immune to corruption. “We see this not only in the less developed countries. Problems of corruption are hard to resolve through reforms, even if some instruments are capable of minimizing this practice.”


Strengthening oversight mechanisms, according to Almeida, is the way to reduce corruption in countries like Brazil.


“The political system is refined not only through reforms but through experience, practice, and, most of all, numerous outside oversight mechanisms. Various mechanisms that sound an alert when something is wrong, when behavior does not correspond to the rules, and so on. Not everthing can be resolved through institutional changes,” she affirmed.


Agência Brasil

Tags:

Ads

You May Also Like

Brazil: Killing Waters Down South, Choking Fires in Brasília

The rain will be less this week than last and river levels began to ...

Brazil Fears no Blackouts or Brownouts At Least Up to 2010

Brazil does not face the risk of running short of electric power, either for ...

To Export More Brazil Needs to Boost Imports

Brazil needs to import more. This was the position defended by the Research and ...

Brazilian Army Trains for Arab Summit

Soldiers of the Brazilian army carried out today a special training to ensure the ...

Brazil Goes Prospecting the Middle East for Tourists

The main trade fair in the tourism sector in the Middle East, the Arabian ...

Opposition Gains Don’t Deter Brazilian Bulls

Brazilian and Latin American shares rose, ahead of this week’s U.S. presidential election. Stocks ...

Brazil to Export 3 Billion Liters of Ethanol This Year

The Arab Brazilian Chamber of Commerce is participating in the International Ethanol Workshop today, ...

A Call to Peace

Look into the eyes of most Brazilians while speaking of Iraq, and you will ...

In Visit to Cuba Brazil President Lambastes Obama for Embargo and for Keeping Guantanamo Open

Brazilian president Dilma Rousseff, a communist guerrilla in her youth, who is visiting Havana ...

Brazil Makes the US’s G-20 of Drug-Friendly Countries

Brazil is in the company of Afghanistan, Bolivia, Burma, Colombia, Nigeria, Pakistan, and Venezuela ...