Industry of Fear Thrives in Brazil

The original target was to collect 80,000 weapons by the end of the year. But the response has been much greater than expected and Brazilian Minister of Justice, Marcio Thomaz Bastos, reports that already Brazil’s Disarmament Campaign has collected 120,000 weapons.

“We have raised our sights and now think we can collect 200,000 by December,” said the Minister.


Bastos is in the state of Paraná, South region, to launch a Disarmament Campaign Caravan that will travel around the country. Paraná will kick off the caravan because it was the first state to officially join the disarmament campaign at the beginning of the year. The state collected 20,000 weapons in six months.


The objective of the caravan is to make people aware of the importance of turning in weapons to the police. Bastos reports that as of now churches, radio stations and health centers will also be receiving weapons because some people are afraid of going to the police.


In July, Brazil’s president Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva signed a decree containing the necessary legislation to make the Disarmament Statute law.


The decree has 77 articles on a wide variety of items. It deals with types of weapons, their use and restrictions on use, as well as regulations for ownership.


The decree also establishes the National Weapons System (Sinam), housed in the Ministry of Justice, and the Military Weapons Management System, housed in the Ministry of Defense.


There will be restrictions on imports of weapons. The restrictions are detailed in the decree. All police firearms will have to be registered. Firearm licenses will have to be renewed every three years. The government has initially US$ 3.2 million to compensate people who turn in weapons.


Disproportionate Killing


“Although Brazilians are only 2.8% of the world’s population, the country has 11% of all the homicides committed on the planet. Unfortunately, that is a number that just keeps rising,” laments Carlos Lopes, who represents the UN Development Program in Brazil. Lopes made his comments at the opening of an international seminar on weapons in Rio de Janeiro, at the end of April.


According to Lopes, in Brazil 40,000 people are killed annually by firearms. “That is more than the number of people killed in Iraq. It is difficult to comprehend that so many people die from gun wounds here, after all Brazil is supposed to be at peace,” he said.


Lopes says that UN data shows that people in the private sector (this does not include the military) are spending almost US$ 24 billion (R$ 70 billion) annually for protection; this is the so-called “industry of fear.”


It is a thriving business that siphons off money from areas that need investments, such as social assistance, he explained.


Agência Brasil

Tags:

You May Also Like

Brazil Is Starting an Intenational Revolution in Men’s Wear

Brazilian men’s fashion is starting to find its space in stores around the world. ...

Brazil Chooses Miss Bumbum, a Tribute to the Country’s Favorite Female Anatomy Part

Hundreds of Brazilian women turned out for the Miss Bumbum “best buttock” competition. “These ...

Brazil’s Coconut Water Coming to a Store Near You

The Brazilian coconut water market is around 600 million liters a year. The development ...

Brazil Promises Minimum Primary Surplus of 4.25%

Brazil’s 2006 budget primary surplus will have a "floor of 4.25% of GDP" forecasted ...

Developing Countries Get Brazilian College Scholarships

Citizens from all over the developing world can apply for scholarships in masters and ...

Rio +20: Green Fund Should Be Scrapped Due to Global Crisis

An idea supported by Brazil (along with the 130 other nations is the misnamed ...

Brazil Congress Ignores Court Order to Hand Over Expenses List

Daily newspaper Folha de S. Paulo has filed a Writ of Security with Brazil's ...

Sun Tzu, Carnegie, Steven Carter, Three Oldies that Spell Gold in Brazil Bookstores

Two are gone and one hasn't written a book in almost ten years, yet ...

Brazil Dedicates Four Days to Celebrate and Sell Underwear and Lingerie

Fevest, the Brazilian Underwear Fashion Tradeshow  has started this Tuesday, August 8, in the ...

Oracle Touts Its On Demand Service in Brazil

For the second time in Latin America, Oracle opened its user conference, called OpenWorld. ...