In Brazil, Getting a Job Can Be Three Times Harder When You Are Poor

Brazilian youngsters between the ages of 16 and 24 from low-income families have a harder time on the job market than those from families with higher incomes. And the difficulty is proportional to income, that is, the poorer the family, the harder it is for youths to find paying jobs.

This conclusion comes from the study, “Youth: Diversities and Challenges in the Metropolitan Job Market,” released by the Inter-Union Department of Statistics and Socioeconomic Studies (Dieese).


The Dieese study was based on data from the Survey of Employment and Unemployment for all of 2004 and done in conjunction with the São Paulo state government’s State System of Data Analysis Foundation (Seade), the Ministry of Labor and Employment, and local governments. Six of the country’s metropolitan areas were researched: São Paulo, Belo Horizonte, Porto Alegre, Recife, Salvador, and the Federal District.


The study divided families into four groups, according to income. In the São Paulo metropolitan area, the unemployment rate in 2004 among young people aged 16 to 24 was 22.1% in the highest income group, 28.9% in the second group, 39.3% in the third group, and 58.5% in the group with the lowest family income. The same pattern is observed in the other regions.


The unemployment rates for the highest and lowest family income groups are, respectively, 26.5% and 66.1% in Belo Horizonte, 31.1% and 66% in Recife, 34.4% and 67.1% in Salvador. In Porto Alegre the disparity is more than triple, with 18.8% unemployment in the highest income group and 58.7% in the lowest income group. In all the regions, the difference is progressive and inversely proportional to income.


Commenting these findings, the Dieese economist, Patrí­cia Lino Costa, said that the data reveal that “those whose financial situation is superior have more access to information and professional training and can exhibit one or more language courses and attend a good university, among other advantages.”


The Dieese study also reveals that in the São Paulo metropolitan area, for example, 68% of the youths from families considered to have the smallest income, and, therefore, the ones most in need of jobs and income, participated in the job market.


In the group of families with the highest income, participation in the job market was 79.2%, despite being the group least in need of jobs and income.


Agência Brasil

Tags:

Ads

You May Also Like

Guess Who Is Bullish on Brazil Now? The Germans and the Dutch

Multinationals keep on betting on the Brazilian market despite the crisis in the global ...

Despite Cheaper Food, Inflation Up in Brazil

Inflation in Brazil resumed an upward trend in October. October’s Broad National Consumer Price ...

Brazil Promotes Use of Natural Gas for 30,000 Buses

The Science, Technology, Development and Tourism Secretariat of the State of São Paulo, Brazil ...

Brazil to Grow a Mere 2.3% in 2005, Says IPEA

Latin American markets gained ground, with Brazilian stocks posting the biggest gains on hopes ...

25 de Março: Over a Century Later This Brazilian Street Is Still in Arab Hands

There were those who opened their doors in the late 19th century, others in ...

Despite Indians and Greens Opposition Brazil Goes Ahead with Amazon Dam

The Brazilian government has given the go-ahead to a controversial project to build a ...

Paradise Guardians

Capão is a bird watcher’s paradise. Ocelot, puma and jaguar still roam freely. The ...

Brazil Is Recovering Its Railroads, But It’s a Long Hard Road

Brazil’s railroad sector is recovering its dynamism, assured the president of the National Rail ...

Brazil’s Pragmatic, Anti-American Look at Beijing’s Olympics

Brazilian people’s feelings about the Olympic games in Beijing are as diverse as the ...

US Creative Way to Get Rid of Hospital Waste and Make a Buck: Exporting It to Brazil

In the United States somebody found out he could solve the problem of hospital ...