Brazil: Rio Selling More Than Raw Material

The Rio de Janeiro State Federation of Industries (Firjan) is commemorating
the structural changes that have occurred in recent years, leading to the
diversification of the state’s export portfolio.

After beginning 2000 with crude oil and natural gas as the major items on its list, Rio is already exporting more and more semi-manufactured and manufactured products, informed the head of the Firjan’s Economic Research department, Luciana Marques de Sá.

“In the past two years there has been a structural change, which has raised the state’s exports significantly. Beginning in 2000, we became strong in crude oil and natural gas exports.


“And beginning in 2002, there has been a growing tendency to export semi-manufactured and manufactured products””indicating greater diversity in the export portfolio.


“The outstanding performers are automobiles, trucks, and buses, which are establishing themselves among the state’s five major export products, with strong growth as well in the last 12 months and this year.”


Recent export records in the agriculture sector and new market niches for meats were the highlights of the 6th Agribusiness Congress scheduled that took place from August 26 to 27 in Rio de Janeiro.


Former minister, Pratini de Morais, president of the Meat Exporter Association (Associação Brasileira da Industria dos Exportadores de Carne) (ABIEC), addressed the congress on “How Brazil became the world’s biggest meat exporter.”

The latest data from the Ministry of Agriculture show that new export records continue to be set. Strong performance in soy, meats, coffee, sugar, alcohol, lumber and cereals resulted in exports totalling US$ 4.4 billion in June, up over 68 percent, compared to June 2003. And this year’s agriculture sector trade surplus is running at US$ 3.96 billion, up 78 percent.

For the first half, farm sector exports totalled US$ 18.5 billion, up 36 percent over the same period in 2003. And the first half surplus of US$ 16.1 billion is up 42.6 percent. Both results historical highs.

At the moment, the agriculture sector accounts for 47.2 percent of all Brazilian exports.

Agência Brasil


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