Brazil’s Finance Minister Close to Resignation on Corruption Charges

The Brazilian Attorney General’s Office will file corruption charges against Finance Minister Antonio Palocci, reported Tuesday, November 15, daily Correio Braziliense in BrasÀ­lia, Brazil’s capital.

Quoting prosecutors Aroldo Costa Filho and Sebastião Sérgio de Silveira, the article says there’s sufficient evidence to prove that during Mr. Palocci’s time as mayor of Ribeirão Preto, the municipality bribed US$ 23,000 a month from the local private waste disposal company.

According to an investigation by prosecutors the money guaranteed the contract between the municipal government headed by Palocci and the Leão Leão Company to which some close supporters of the mayor had links.

The first allegations in the case were revealed by Rogério Buratti, who served as an adviser to Mr. Palocci and later worked for Leão Leão.

Palocci was mayor of Ribeirão Preto from 1993 to 1996 and again from 2001 to 2002, when he resigned to join President Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva’s administration.

The allegations of wrongdoing during his time as mayor of Ribeirão Preto have placed Palocci in a delicate position, with increasing speculation in financial and political circles that he will have to resign in coming days.

Mr. Palocci has been summoned Wednesday before a congressional committee that plans to question him about Brazil’s economic policy and the charges against him. The Brazilian press reports the Minister has been out of sight since last Friday, and his office claims he has taken several days off.

Since last May/June President Lula da Silva’s Workers Party has been exposed in Congress to corruption charges particularly a regular payments scheme to ensure political support for the administration with money laundered from private and government companies.

The corruption ring that forced the resignation of several close aides of President Lula apparently managed tens of millions of US dollars deposited in local banks and overseas financial havens.

This article appeared originally in Mercopress – www.mercopress.com.

Tags:

  • Show Comments (2)

  • Guest

    Emerald City
    “Pay no attention to the man behind the curtain.”

  • Guest

    Mohammed Saeed al-Sahhaf, former Iraqi I
    “Lies I tell you, all lies. No bribes were involved. No money changed hands. This is all a creation of the elitist anti-democratic forces that are seeking to overthrow the duly elected Brazilian government. Refuse to believe any of the news reports. They are all part of a conspiracy to divert attention from the continuing popularity of Presdient Lula and the countless achievements of the PT.”

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

comment *

  • name *

  • email *

  • website *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Ads

You May Also Like

85% of Schools for Indians in Brazil Don’t Go Over 4th Grade

Brazil’s  indigenous population will get around 400 new schools, according to information from the ...

Without Health Insurance Brazilians in US Fear Another Medical Tragedy

Brazilians who live in Massachusetts and who were friends or knew FabÀ­ola de Paula, ...

Five Years Without Ayrton

It doesn’t seem like five years since that fatal crash at the Tamburello curve ...

Brazil’s Surplus Grows to US$ 16 Billion for the Year

Brazilian exports added up to US$ 1.108 billion in the first two working days ...

Chí¡vez Suggests in Brazil Popular Housing Along South American Pipeline

The Presidents of Brazil, Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva, Venezuela, Hugo Chávez, and Argentina, ...

Egypt Chicken Import Gives Brazil a Shot in the Arm

Brazil has started exporting large volumes of chicken meat to the Egyptian market. According ...

Letters

A song and the news Here I am in Atlanta, Georgia, starting a Master’s ...

Brazil Resumes FTAA Talks with the US

This month Brazil reopens negotiations with the United States over the creation of the ...

Brazil Grows 6% in First Half and Expects 5.5% Growth in 2008

According to the latest release from the IBGE (Brazilian Institute of Geography and Statistics). ...