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Brazil Accepts to Lower Import Tariffs to 9.9%, But With Conditions

Brazil’s Minister of Foreign Relations, Celso Amorim, sent a message to worried members of the Brazilian industrial sector that all Brazil will do at the 6th Ministerial Meeting of the World Trade Organization in Hong Kong this month is present a proposal to lower the average import tariff for the sector from 10.8% to 9.9%.

Speaking at a meeting of the Economic and Social Development Council, Amorim called the offer significant but well within reason. He explained that Brazil intended to use the flexibility clauses that WTO norms permit as a tool and maintain higher tariffs in sensitive sectors.

Amorim went on to say that the Brazilian offer would remain on the table only if the European Union and the United States make positive offers regarding market access and farm subsidy reductions. He insisted there had to be some kind of parity.

"Developing countries will reduce industrial sector import tariffs if there is an equivalent counterproposal for farm produce in developed nations," said the Minister.

Otherwise, he pointed out, the WTO talks would be a double failure, doubly unjust. "That is because this round of negotiations has two goals: reduce the gap between the developed and the developing nations, as well as reduce the gap between the industrial and agricultural sectors," explained the Minister.

Rising Surplus

Brazil’s foreign trade surplus in November reached US$ 4.09 billion, with exports of US$ 10.79 billion and imports of US$ 6.7 billion. That was the year’s third biggest monthly surplus (behind only July’s US$ 5 billion, and September’s US$ 4.3 billion).

The cumulative trade surplus, January to November, is now at US$ 40.44 billion, an increase of 34.08% (US$ 10.27 billion), compared to the same period last year.

Total exports for the year have now reached US$ 107.41 billion (up 24% over the same period in 2004), and imports US$ 66.97 billion (up 18%).

ABr

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  • Show Comments (2)

  • Guest

    Trying to Importing into Brazil is having to deal with the worst most corrupt people in the country. The Brazilian government wants to export, but not import otherwise it would do something about this problem.

    Why else besides greed and corruption would Brazilians pay so much for household/kitchen appliances. Computer software, cars and so on.

    Somethimes its many times more expensive to buy the above mentioned products locally then it is in even the USA and thats taking into consideration exchange rates.

    The government must start looking after the concerns of its citizens.

  • Guest

    quite contradictory !
    His statement “Developing countries will reduce industrial sector import tariffs if there is an equivalent counterproposal for farm produce in developed nations,”

    But if we reduce by 50 % or so or eliminate our subisidises in agriculture, reducing your industrial goods rate from 10.9 to 9.9 % is not equivalent whatever way you look at it.

    You want fair trade without being fair yourself. Your trade balance is already highly positive.
    And who will finance and pay for the many thirld world countries net importers of foods sold by you ?
    You said that without subisidises agriculture prices would go higher. Who will pay for the prices differences when already today these countries cannot pay what they import at today’s prices ?

    You ? No problem ! You borrow and lend to them ! You then will be responsible for their hunger or will make write offs of money YOU loaned to them !

    But you cannot have it both ways !

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