• Categories
  • Archives

Brazil Still Ambivalent on Adopting Genetically Modified Crops

Brazilian legislation permits the cultivation of one type of genetically modified (GM) soy and another single type of GM cotton, pursuant to rulings by the National Biosafety Commission (Comissão Técnica Nacional de Biossegurança) (CTNBio), an agency housed in the Ministry of Science and Technology.

Following a long legal battle, the Monsanto GM soy, known as Roundup Ready (RR), began to be planted in Brazil in 1998. GM cotton, known as Bt, has been legally planted in Brazil since March of 2005 (Bt stands for bacillus thuringiensis which is a foreign gene added that protects the cotton crop from the pest known as bollworm (A. lepidoptora)). At the same time, it is legal in Brazil to import GM corn for animal feed, but not for human consumption or planting.

The CTNBio has ruled that there are no limits on the percentage of GMO in GM soy grown in Brazil although there must be labelling informing consumers of their presence.

As for GM cotton, the CTNBio gave special permission for its cultivation after a shortfall in cotton seeds in 2004 and cases of contamination.

At the moment, the CTNBio is examining requests for authorization of eleven more GMOs.

João Paulo Capobianco, the secretary of Biodiversity and Forests at the Ministry of Environment says the fact is that the Brazilian government has not defined its position on GMOs.

"As for labelling, the Ministry is in favor of total information. Any exporting country, including Brazil, should have detailed information on labels," he declared.

However, there are different opinions in the government on labelling, says Capobianco. For example, there is a movement to have generalized rather than detailed labelling. Thus, a product would be labelled "may contain GMOs," rather than "contains GMOs."

Meanwhile the NGO Greenpeace has stepped up its campaign against GMOs, saying that Brazil faces a serious problem with the contamination of native species of cotton that have been cultivated for thousands of years.

"There is a danger of losing biodiversity," says Gabriela Couto, of Greenpeace.

Agência Brasil

Tags:

  • Show Comments (0)

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

comment *

  • name *

  • email *

  • website *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Ads

You May Also Like

Movits’s multifaceted art

Brazilian Ricardo Movits is the artist who is writer who is musician who is ...

Brazil’s Oil Spill Firm Romancing the Arabs

AGS environmental solutions, a Brazilian company that works in prevention and control of accidents ...

In Memoriam of Brazil’s Elizeth: At 85, Still Heavenly and Moony

Divine. Moonlit. Magnificent. Elizeth Cardoso sprung from the stages of Rio de Janeiro and ...

Brazil Warns Chavez: Keep Your Hands Off Mercosur

Brazil’s Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva warned Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez that "interference" by ...

After Brazil Complaint Britain Decides to Take Back 1,000 Tons of Toxic Trash

Brazil has announced that it will lodge a formal complaint with the World Trade ...

Brazil’s Tough Talk Bends US on Cotton Subsidies

The United States Congress approved this week scrapping subsidies to the cotton industry and ...

‘I Defend a Palestinian State and Israel,’ Says Brazil’s Lula

The result of the Summit of South American – Arab Countries will come “in ...

Nothing New at Brazil’s New Cabinet

Brazilian President Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva invested, March 22, the new Ministers of ...

Brazil Getting 85,000 New Cases of Tuberculosis a Year

Brazil managed to cure between 75% and 77% of the tuberculosis cases detected in ...

Four-Year Graduate Course in Islamic Theology to Start in Brazil

The Muslim Beneficent Society of the Santo Amaro neighborhood, in the city of São ...