• Categories
  • Archives

Some Brazilian Women Routinely Deported from Europe Are Sex Slaves

Part of the Brazilian women who were deported from or not admitted to Europe are victims of international human trafficking for sexual exploitation purposes.

This is the conclusion of a research dealing with women who return to Brazil via Guarulhos airport in São Paulo (the main entrance for foreign flights )after being deported or not allowed entrance in European countries.

The study was conducted in March and April 2005. 175 women answered questionnaires and 15 were interviewed. 76% of them were not admitted to their destination countries. 25% of the women interviewed admitted that they offered sexual services in Europe. Portugal led the countries with most refusals of Brazilian women, followed by Italy, France, Spain, and England.

The research also investigated the deported women. The majority is of humble origin, from the states of Goiás, Paraná and Minas Gerais (Central West, South, and Southeast regions respectively), with monthly income of up to three minimum wages (US$ 420.00). Ages varied between 25 and 40.

In 2004, according to the Federal Police, approximately 22.5 thousand Brazilian citizens were deported or not admitted to foreign countries. Of this total, 15,000 reentered Brazil through the Guarulhos Airport, and 33% were women.

The research was ordered by the National Secretariat of Justice and by the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crimes (UNODC). Several federal organisms that operate on that airport contributed to the study, such as the Federal Police, the Federal Highway Police, the Federal Revenue and Customs Secretariat, the Brazilian Airport Infrastructure Company (Infraero), and the National Sanitary Surveillance Agency (Anvisa).

The non-governmental organizations Brazilian Association of Women Defense (Associação Brasileira de Defesa da Mulher – ASBRAD), and Marginalized Women Service (Serviço da Mulher Marginalizada) also participated in the study.

Anti Slavery Campaign

Since 2004 the Brazilian Ministry of Justice and the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) have been conducting a Campaign to Combat International Human Trafficking.

The campaign’s slogans are "First they take away your passport, then your freedom" and "If someone offers you lodging, food, and clean clothes abroad, don’t believe it."

Both refer to the countless instances of women who leave Brazil under the pretext of enjoying a better life abroad and end up becoming victims of sexual exploitation.

The campaign consists in the distribution of inserts in passports and packages of condoms provided by the Ministry of Health and the placement of posters in airports,

Federal Police buildings, and busy spots in general. All the material gives the telephone number to report cases of human trafficking. The campaign also broadcasts its messages on the radio.

According to the UNODC, human trafficking is one of the most profitable activities exercised by organized crime and is responsible for around US$ 9 billion in business annually. It is estimated that each victim represents approximately US$ 30 in profits for the recruiters.

Agência Brasil

Tags:

  • Show Comments (0)

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

comment *

  • name *

  • email *

  • website *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Ads

You May Also Like

Brazil’s Ports Still Not Prepared Against Terrorism

Security norms are becoming increasingly rigorous worldwide, both for passengers and cargo, and there ...

New Details of the Scandal that Shook the Brazilian Government

Two publicity and public relations agencies linked to the bribes scandal shocking Brazil, regularly ...

Brazil’s WSF Splits for Anti-Liberal Planetary Fight

Next year’s World Social Forum (WSF), which is now taking place in Brazil, will ...

In Meeting with Kirchner Lula Demands Prompt Restoration of Zelaya in Honduras

The governments and businessmen from Brazil and Argentina have to learn that both countries ...

Brazilian protesters's sign against US president: Off with Bush

Briefing Bush on Brazil the CIA Way

Ahead of President George W. Bush’s visit to Brazil I thought I would try ...

Microsoft Offers Free Computer Training and Email to 5.5 Million Brazilians

An alliance between Microsoft and the government of the state of São Paulo, in ...

Gas Prices Help Push Inflation Up in Brazil

October’s Broad Consumer Price Index (IPCA) was 0.75%, double September’s rate of 0.35%. The ...

A National Guard

New official statistics show that the subterranean economy in Brazil employs one in every ...

Lula’s Credit Rating Downgraded

In the next few weeks, we should see whether Lula’s government has the political ...

Brazil Gets First Exclusive Publication for iPad. It’s a Free 24/7 Experience

Brazil is getting a glimpse of its first media interface developed specially for the ...