Biotech Crops Curb Erosion and Pollution in the US and Brazil, Says GM Crowd

Since the introduction of biotech crops in 1996, farmers have reduced – and, in some cases, completely stopped – plowing or tilling the soil to eliminate weeds and prepare fields for planting.

The benefits of conservation tillage range from less erosion to improved wildlife habitat to a reduction in greenhouse gases and fuel use.

"Our problem with erosion was very serious and it was very damaging to the environment to the extent that, in these crops, to produce one ton of grain in Brazil, we lost 10 tons of soil per hectare per year. We solved this problem by eliminating tillage," says Almir Rebelo, grower advisor and president of Friends of the Earth, a Brazilian grower organization.

With conservation tillage, farmers leave the stubble or plant residue on the soil’s surface, rather than plowing or disking it into the soil.

The new crop is planted directly into this stubble, and GM (genetically modified) herbicide-tolerant plants make it possible and practical for growers to control weeds in the crop by applying an herbicide rather than plowing.

A reduction in plowing means a decrease in the number "tractor trips" across a field – resulting in fuel savings and a reduction in greenhouse gases.

"Looking at the impact on greenhouse gas emissions, the technology has helped deliver important savings," says Graham Brookes, an agricultural economist and director of UK-based PG Economics.

"In 2004, 10 billion kilograms less carbon dioxide have been released into the atmosphere. And that’s equivalent to taking 20 percent of the cars in the United Kingdom off the road for a year."

In the United States alone, farmers have increased no-till crop acres by 35 percent since 1996 when GM crops were first planted.

"We no longer have to till the fields to control weeds, where we used to have to till two, three times and use more diesel and jeopardize the soil to more erosion," says Terry Wanzek, a U.S. corn and soybean farmer.

"As a result of us keeping crop residue on the ground, we have a new foraging opportunity for wildlife," says U.S. cotton, corn and soybean farmer Jay Hardwick.

"So we’re seeing a new happening on the landscape in terms of wildlife emergence. Not only top of it, but underneath. Earthworms are coming back to play, and earthworms are strategic in getting water into the soil structure."

The impact of conservation agriculture has been just as significant to farmers in the developing world.

"We do not have to burn the residue in our harvest anymore," says Jerry Due, a Philippine corn farmer. "We just allow the residue to decompose in the field to become fertilizers."

These comments – as well as comments from two additional experts and four additional farmers – are available in a short video and podcast about conservation agriculture at Monsanto Company’s "Conversations about Plant Biotechnology" website: www.monsanto.com/biotech-gmo/new.htm.

Visitors to the "Conversations about Plant Biotechnology" website can access dozens of additional videos with the farmers and families who grow GM crops and the experts who research and study the technology.

Monsanto – www.monsanto.com

Tags:

  • Show Comments (3)

  • John

    Biotech Crops Curb Erosion and Pollution
    [..]Antibacterial and antimicrobial biotechnology information, personal response system research[…]
    http://clickstorm.org

  • Guest

    cute pic tho

  • Guest

    wht the fuck??

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

comment *

  • name *

  • email *

  • website *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Ads

You May Also Like

Brazil Invests in Steel Production Getting Ready for Global Boom

The Brazilian capacity for steel production should reach 50 million tons per year in ...

Dramatic Jump in Brazil’s Dairy Exports

Through August of this year, Brazil exported more dairy products than it did in ...

Middle East’s Index Fair Showcases 36 Brazilian Companies

Index, the largest accessory and decoration fair of the Middle East, should count on ...

Literature:

Vadinho, Dona Flor’s first husband died on a Sunday of Carnaval, in the morning, ...

Fear of Recession Makes Brazilian Real Fall 3% in One Day

The Brazilian real, Brazil's currency, fell the most in four months battered by the ...

Brazil’s Ex-Chief of Staff Denies Everything, But Doesn’t Convince Congress Committee

During more than seven hours of testimony before the Brazilian Congress’s Ethics Council (Conselho ...

Especiaria by Flávio Chamis

Flí¡vio Chamis Takes Us on a Discovery Voyage Through Brazilian Musical Lands

The mix of classical and popular occurs as a seemingly natural development in the ...

Naughty, Naughty Santa

There is no other country like Brazil in which the lines between men’s magazines ...

Bad News on Industry Output Sends Brazil Downhill

Brazilian and Latin American stocks slumped, as investors took some profits following strong gains ...

Far and Away

Distances are so tremendous and communications so primitive, in the Amazonas, that countless number ...