Amnesty Probes Charges of Violence Against Women in Brazil

Tim Cahill and Patrick Wilcken, who represent Amnesty International, are participating today, June 12, in a public hearing in the northeastern Brazilian state of Pernambuco legislative assembly in Recife.

The purpose is to discuss charges of human rights violations in the state, mainly against women. The meeting is sponsored by the National Human Rights Movement.

Cahill and Wilcken will spend the week in Recife, where they plan to meet with members of the Public Prosecutor’s Office, the judiciary, state departments of Justice and Social Defense, and representatives of human rights organizations and community associations. The topics that will be discussed are public safety, urban violence, and social exclusion.

One of the main criticisms of Brazil appearing in the Amnesty International Report 2006, released earlier this year, has to do with abuses, such as torture, mistreatment, and assassination, committed by the Brazilian police. The document is based on investigations conducted in 2005.

According to Amnesty, Federal and state police officers were involved in criminal and corrupt activities, as well as in murders committed by the so-called "death squad," which the international human rights organization says includes both active and retired police officers. According to the report, records show that the police killed 9,000 people between 1999 and 2004.

"The investigation of these homicides remains minimal," the text states. The document underscores the campaign against torture launched by the federal government in December.

Nevertheless, Amnesty says that in 2005 it received information about torture in juvenile detention centers administered by the São Paulo State Youth Welfare Foundation (FEBEM).

The international human rights organization also emphasizes the awful conditions in prisons when it comes to sanitary facilities and the lack of medical services. These conditions favor the outbreak of riots and the high degree of violence among inmates.

ABr

Tags:

  • Show Comments (0)

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

comment *

  • name *

  • email *

  • website *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Ads

You May Also Like

U2's Bono

Bono, Jagger and All Has-Been Rockers Rock Brazil to Boredom

São Paulo held its St Patrick’s day celebrations early this year as U2 (or ...

Governor Serra Finally Admits He Wants to Be Brazil’s Next President

José Serra, Brazil’s main opposition leader and governor of the country’s biggest state of ...

69% Positive: Brazilian President Rides Popularity Wave

Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva, the Brazilian president, celebrated "Brazil's newly acquired investment grade ...

Petrobras Surplus 600% Bigger than Last Year’s

Together the greater supply of Brazilian oil for export, the reduction of spread (the ...

Brazil Wants to Lower Number of Blank and Annulled Votes

The president of Brazil’s Federal Election Board (Tribunal Superior Eleitoral) (TSE), Marco Aurélio de ...

Brazil’s Ports Still Not Prepared Against Terrorism

Security norms are becoming increasingly rigorous worldwide, both for passengers and cargo, and there ...

Lack of Hygiene in Hospitals in Brasília Kills 22 People

After the death of four more people victims of the KPC superbacteria in Brazil’s ...

Jeitinho, Brazil’s Creative Way to Break the Law and Feel Virtuous About It

American historian Robert M. Levine, director of Latin American Studies at the University of ...

Indians and Farmers in State of War in Brazil

The almost 4,000 Terena people who live in the 2,090 hectares of the Buriti ...

Paraguay Tells Brazil: We Don’t Want a Friendly Hand. But Justice and Our Money

Fernando Lugo, the president of Paraguay, said he is looking forward to the coming ...