35 Indians Prosecuted in Brazil for Invading and Destroying Properties

Thirty-five leaders of the Xukuru people are being prosecuted for having reacted to the murder of two young indigenous people and to an attempt to murder their chief.

The depositions of the leaders to a federal court began on August 3 in the city of Caruaru, state of Pernambuco, in northeastern Brazil, and they will continue until August 24. Ten people have been heard already.

They are being prosecuted under charges of having invaded homes, setting fire to them and damaging them and of having ordered the destruction of real estate items.

On February 7, 2003, an attempt against the life of chief Marcos Xukuru caused the death of two young people who were accompanying him and tried to defend him. In that incident, Josení­lson José dos Santos and José Ademilson Barbosa da Silva, two indigenous people, were killed. José Lourival Frazão was prosecuted and sentenced to prison for the crime.

On the date of the incident, an outraged group of Xukuru went to the Cimbres village to demand explanations from the perpetrators of the crimes and their supporters. When they got there, they were shot at and four indigenous people were injured. Nobody is being prosecuted for this act.

In their investigations, the Federal Police and the Federal Prosecutor’s Office turned the victims of the incident into defendants: chief Marcos Xukuru is also being prosecuted based on the argument that he caused the conflict.

During the depositions this week, the defendants said that a crowd of about 2,000 people reacted against the murders and that although the leaders tried to control them, it was impossible to prevent them from expelling from the indigenous land the group that committed the acts, which is an ally of politicians and farmers of the region. The leaders also reported that they collaborated with the Military Police to allow the dissident group to be removed from the land.

Since the 1980s, the Xukuru have been fighting against a project designed to create a structure for the Our Lady of Thanks Sanctuary, located inside the indigenous land, to become a religious tourist site. For this reason, Funai, members of the local Catholic Church and politicians of the region began to try and divide the people and to sponsor violent acts against the Xukuru.

On many occasions, government agencies in charge of indigenous issues were warned by traditional Xukuru leaders that the interests of political and economic groups which were alien to the indigenous people were creating a serious internal conflict among them.

Tags:

You May Also Like

Like in the Movies: Robbers Tunnel into US$ 65 Million from Brazil’s Central Bank

A group of robbers stole a record 65.2 million US dollars by tunneling into ...

Dengue Jumps 180% in South of Brazil. Authorities Urge Public

A bulletin from Brazil’s Ministry of Health reports that the number of cases of ...

Brazil’s Foreign Affairs Are Blossoming

The Brazilian Export Promotion Agency (Apex/Brasil), linked to the Ministry of Development, Industry, and ...

Al Jazeera's news broadcast

Al Jazeera and Brazil’s Bandeirantes Are Now Partners in News

An agreement recently announced between Al Jazeera TV, from Qatar, and Bandeirantes, a Brazilian ...

Corruption Inquiries in Brazil Result in 47 Dismissals. More Heads to Roll.

Federal government investigations into accusations of corruption in State-run enterprises have led to 47 ...

Brazil Exports to Arabs Up 62%

The Brazilian foreign trade figures with the 22 Arab countries have already exceeded, from ...

Nixon Era and US and Brazilian Imperialism Still Very Present

A set of documents published by George Washington University’s National Security Archive on August ...

Arab Skies Friendlier to Brazil’s Embraer

Gulf Air, an airline belonging to the governments of Bahrain, Oman and Abu Dhabi, ...

Brazil: Sí£o Paulo Campaign Gets Botox Enhancement

Miaow! Cat fight! Cat fight! To liven up Sunday, Monica Dallari, the girlfriend of ...

Shorter Lives

The fecundity rate has declined dramatically from the 60s and 70s when every Brazilian ...