Brazil’s Vivo Teams Up With ReCellular to Save Cell Phones from Trash

US-based ReCellular, an international collector, reseller and recycler of used wireless cell phones and accessories, has entered into a two-year partnership with Vivo, the leading mobile telecommunications service provider in Brazil with almost 30% of the cell phone market in the country.

The Portugal-based Vivo serves over 28.5 million consumers and its partnership with ReCellular tries to, as they say it, "safely and securely recycle retired cell phones to ensure environmentally-friendly disposal."

"ReCellular and Vivo are partnering in one of the largest handset recycling initiatives the wireless industry has ever seen," said Charles Newman, president and CEO of ReCellular, Inc.

"Vivo’s network is the largest in the southern hemisphere, which means there is the potential to properly recycle tens of millions of cell phones."

The launch of the recycling program is set to happen in early November in 58 stores in three major cities including 15 locations in Rio de Janeiro, 11 locations in Brasilia and 32 locations in São Paulo.

The complete partnership will expand to in-store collection at up to over 4,000 collection points throughout Brazil.

Keeping as many cell phones as possible from reaching Brazil’s landfills or polluting its environment is the main objective for the program. 

Once the cell phones are received by ReCellular, they will be put through the Cell Phone Data Eraser program to erase all previous data stored on the phone prior to reuse.  Funds generated from the program will go to local charities in the three participating cities.

For over fifteen years, ReCellular has been working with retailers, manufacturers, charitable groups and environmental organizations to create cell phone recycling solutions that benefit the public without impacting retailers in terms of cost or effort. 

The company already collects thousands of cell phones at drop-off locations around the United States and Canada, and then reconditions the equipment for resale in developing markets where new equipment is often cost-prohibitive.

Tags:

  • Show Comments (0)

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

comment *

  • name *

  • email *

  • website *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Ads

You May Also Like

Fab Four Resung

"I Want to Hold Your Hand" was the track that amused me the most. ...

In Blood of the Wicked, a Brazilian Cop Turns Out to Be the Good Guy

George Demko, a professor at Dartmouth University, has carved out an interesting niche for ...

High Inflation Doesn’t Deter Bulls in Brazil

Latin American stocks were mixed to higher, with Brazilian stocks advancing, as signs of ...

Brazil Opens Amazon for Logging and Greenpeace Applauds

Brazil has approved a law granting licenses for wood logging in publicly owned sections ...

Tom Jobim and Vinicius, the Brazilian Odd Couple Who Started It All – Part Three

Enter the American director, writer, producer, actor and jack-of-all-media-trades, the inimitable Orson Welles, once ...

In Brazil, Man and Two Women Confess to Cannibalism and Selling Human Meat Pies

According to police chief Wesley Fernando, from Garanhuns, in the northeastern state of Brazil, ...

Cry of Excluded Brings 1 Million to the Streets of Brazil

The participation of indigenous people in the 2004 Cry of the Excluded protest brought ...

Brazil’s Lula Might Win Reelection and Still Lose His Mandate

Brazilian President Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva is headed toward a first-round victory Sunday ...

Slavery Lives

Brazilian Indians who learned the Portuguese and received some schooling are being expelled from ...

Beating as Usual

Amnesty International tells that police torture to obtain confessions is a routine practice in ...