Paranaguí¡ Becomes First Brazilian Port to Get International Security Seal

The Port of Paranaguá, in the southern Brazilian state of Paraná, will receive this Thursday, December 14, its International Ship and Port Facility Security (ISPS) Code.

The Code is a certification that both the access to the port’s premises and the pier area comply with international security regulations. Investment in qualification for the certification totaled US$ 2 million. Paranaguá will be the first port in Brazil to receive the ISPS.

The resources invested were applied into purchasing biometric identification equipment (through hand palm reading), 69 monitoring cameras, road weighbridges, electronic systems for bar-code reading and new fences.

An exclusive area was created for Federal Police, and new energy generators were installed, as well as new illumination systems for the public premises, exports corridor, workshop, managerial headquarters and annexes. The certification includes the Port of Antonina, also in Paraná.

"The Port of Paranaguá is of utmost importance to Brazil, and its certification is a great step forward to our country," claimed João Carlos de Menezes, acting president for the National Commission for Public Security in Ports, Terminals and Navigable Waterways (Conportos).

Conportos is a collegiate comprised of the ministries of Justice, Transportation, Finance, Foreign Relations and Navy. It is presided by the Ministry of Justice, and in charge of approving Brazilian security and inspection plans for international certification in all premises operating in foreign trade.

The Port of Paranaguá is Latin America’s largest port for grains, and the world’s sixth largest in this category. In 2005, the port handled 30 million tons, including exports and imports.

This year, cargo handling is estimated to reach 31 million tons, which would represent a 3% increase. During the certification ceremony, another US$ 8 million worth of investments will be delivered for improving the piers, reforming the administrative buildings and constructing two new buildings.

Out of the 209 Brazilian ports and terminals that are yet to implement the international code, 152 have already received the Statement of Compliance. The standardization of security procedures was decreed by the International Maritime Organization (IMO), an organization linked to the United Nations (UN).

Omar Nasser works for Fiep, Paraná State’s Industry Federation.

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