Brazil Tells US to Help Poor Countries Instead of Making Own Ethanol

Brazil is suggesting that the African nations start producing renewable fuel as a way to improve the area's economy, creating new jobs for a product expected to have big demand in the years to come.

Many regions in Africa have favorable soil and climate conditions for bio-fuels production, according to the president of Petrobras, José Sergio Gabrielli.

He was a member of the Brazilian delegation that accompanied president Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva in Davos, Switzerland, during the World Economic Forum, which ended this Sunday, January 28.

The suggestion for the African continent to become a producer of renewable fuel was made in Davos by president Lula, who offered Brazilian technology to help the Africans.

"We believe this might be a way out for these countries," said Gabrielli. "The key issue, though, is not technology, but rather the financial aspect," Lula claimed.

Lula suggested to the businessmen in attendance at the World Economic Forum that wealthy countries might finance projects for bio-fuel production.

"Bio-diesel generates employment, income and development, and the Brazilian program could be an example to be implemented in African and Central American countries, with financing from wealthy countries," Lula said.

Lula mentioned that instead of producing ethanol out of corn, for instance, the United States should finance bio-diesel projects in poor countries, which could also be cheaper.

Professor Mário Ferreira Presser, who coordinates the Economic Diplomacy Course at the University of Campinas (Unicamp), in the southeastern Brazilian state of São Paulo, said that bio-diesel projects "have many attractive aspects: they would benefit Africans, Europeans and Brazilians. These projects would address the issues of climate and poverty, and liberate the sugar and alcohol markets."

"The strategy of Brazilian businessmen consists of showing that they will not single-handedly become major ethanol producers, but rather that many other developing countries may benefit from this market opening," says Professor Presser.

"The World Bank has also shown enthusiasm regarding the issue. Since no one knows exactly how to deal with the African problem, turning the continent into a producer of a commodity for which there is a guaranteed demand would be a tremendous step forward, and a great achievement for Brazil," according to Mário Presser.

"This is a business that should attract the interest of leading investors, because the prospect of making profit is very high," said Gabrielli.

Tags:

Ads

You May Also Like

Shooting Is All I Know –

Social exclusion and injustice are fundamental questions that led me to make City of ...

Amrik, the Arab Life in Brazil and South America, Comes to NY

Photography show Amrik: The Arab Presence in South America, which was developed by the ...

Brazil President Sees Crisis as Chance to Create New Global Economic Order

The president of Brazil, Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva urged unions and workers to ...

The Day Brazil’s Economist Furtado Became Sartre’s Chauffeur

Around the middle of October 1960, on a Friday afternoon, Celso Furtado decides to ...

Brazil Vows to Double Per Capita Income by 2022 to US$ 22,000

Dilma Rousseff, the president of Brazil, said that the government intends to double per ...

An Explosive Situation in Rio: Manholes Detonating Like Bombs

Once again this week a manhole in the center of Rio, on the corner ...

Despite Cheaper Food, Inflation Up in Brazil

Inflation in Brazil resumed an upward trend in October. October’s Broad National Consumer Price ...

How I Taught English in Brazil And Survived to Tell the Story: Lesson 2

More often than not, the sharp-eyed professor is forced to improvise a tailor-made solution ...

Seven Suitors to a Speaker’s Chair in Brazil

As Brazil’s political party leaders met to work out the details of the election ...

Brazil’s Auto Parts Sector Expecting to Export US$ 6.7 Billion, an 11% Growth

Exports of Brazilian auto parts to the Arab countries totalled US$ 23.4 million between ...