Toyota Gets into the Flex-Fuel Business in Brazil

Toyota Corolla flex-fuel car in Brazil Toyota is launching cars that run on ethanol and gasoline in Brazil amid growing popularity of fuel-flexible vehicles in the nation. The leading car maker's unit in Brazil said this week it will unveil two flex-fuel Corollas in Brazil. These models can outperform gas-fueled Corollas on the Brazilian market.

The cheapest option, the XLi, will start at 56,565 reais (US$ 29,055) while the top of the line SEG, will start at 79,676 reais (US$ 40,927). The car's engine suffered several changes including the introduction of resin to prevent corrosion and a new program for the electronic module that controls the car.

Monthly sales are expected to target about 2,500 Corolla Flex and 750 of the Corolla Fielder Flex model. The models underscore Toyota's plan to adapt to regional markets. This is the first time the automaker is selling cars that run on 100 percent bio-ethanol.

The new models come amid a booming ethanol producing industry that has sprouted in Brazil a couple of years ago. Automakers are scurrying to get into the flex-fuel market.

Ethanol is produced from corn, sugar cane, and other crops; it costs about half as much as gasoline. The production of ethanol from sugar cane has bee lauded for its environment-friendly process that is used in manufacturing.

Currently, Brazil is the largest maker of sugar cane because sugar cane flourishes in sunny Brazil. It is replanted every five years and it is the cheapest ethanol available worldwide.

Most drivers in the South American nation prefer to drive cars that use ethanol as it allows them to choose fuel dependent on local prices. Not surprisingly, eight out of ten cars sold in Brazil are flex-fuels. Honda Motor Co. has already begun marketing its flex-fuel Civics and Fits models in the country.

Flex-fuel cars were initially introduced to Brazil in 2003.

Mercopress

Tags:

Ads

You May Also Like

Global Warming May Cost Brazil Up to US$ 2 Trillion a Year in 40 Years

Brazil will lose between US$ 417 billion (in an optimist scenario) and US$ 2 ...

Making It There

It is believed that for every Brazilian who makes it big in the United ...

Gas Retailers in Brazil Accuse Sugar Mill Owners of Lack of Scruples

According to the Retail Fuel Merchants’ Syndicate (Sindicomb), the problems that the Brazilian federal ...

Brazilian Organic Farmer Show Their Goods at Germany’s Biofach

Brazil’s Água Boa (Good Water) project, developed by the Environmental Coordination at Itaipu Binacional, ...

Reducing Work to 40 Hours a Week in Brazil Without Lowering Wages Is Smart and Fair

To transform the unequal and unjust structures of our society was always one of ...

Brazil’s Lula Says No to Last Debate and Opponent Calls Him a Deserter

Those who bet that Brazilian President Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva would take part ...

Angola Backs a Bigger Global Role for Brazil

Brazilian President Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva received the President of Angola, José Eduardo ...

Expatriates, Brazilians Included, Are Sending Less Money Home

The volume of funds shipped by expatriates worldwide to their home countries should decrease ...

Brazil’s Focus on Africa and Poor Nations Is Right Choice, Says Lula

In a speech at the launching of the Global Call for Action against Poverty, ...

An ATM machine in Salvador, Bahia, Brazil

Dealing with ATM Machines in Brazil Is Easier Said than Done

In my previous article I wrote about the difficulties of withdrawing money at ATMs ...