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Robin
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12/09/2002
13:49:34
Subject: Gringo's guide to Brazil !
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1. Don't wear black (or dark) socks with shorts. NOBODY here does that, except for European gringos (you German and Scandinavian guys mostly). It's a dead giveaway.

2. The socks you do wear with shorts, should not be pulled up high, like a football (soccer) player. They should be pulled down loose around the ankles.

3. Hair is another dead giveaway. The guys here don't have hair that is spiky or sticks up or swooshes back. Anything between Johnny Rotten and James Dean means you're a definite out-of-towner. A baseball cap is a good idea. They are really common here, and they are also very practical under the glare of the strong tropical sun.

4. Dressing down doesn't make you look poor; it makes you look like, again, a gringo. Brazilians, even poor Brazilians, like to dress decently. Their clothes are clean and pressed, even t-shirts. I'm not saying not to wear what you like to wear (read: old, faded clothes with holes), but again, be aware that it sets you apart.

5. Oh, and you German guys (I swear I'm not picking on you) who like to show off your legs in those short jean cutoffs, if you wear them here everybody will think you're gay. Hey! If you are gay, or have no problems with being seen as such, no problem!

6. Avoid walking around with a backpack firmly planted between your shoulderblades. If you do for any reason go out and around with a pack, and it's not too heavy, wear it slung over one shoulder. If it's too heavy or bulky for that, and you're walking down a crowded sidewalk or taking a city bus, wear it in front, like a baby carrier. That's what people here do. It's not uncool; to do otherwise makes you look like an otário (sucker).



Patinho
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12/09/2002
21:46:29
RE: Gringo's guide to Brazil !
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uummm .... thanks for the helpful tips. And while trying not to sound like a smart ass, what prompted you to post it?


Down to Earth
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12/10/2002
02:52:38
RE: Gringo's guide to Brazil !
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Anyone who wears socks with shorts should be shot.


brazzaboy
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12/10/2002
03:56:42
RE: Gringo's guide to Brazil !
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Another dead giveaway, even if you wear long pants don't wear socks with sandals. Yeah I got caught doing that.


Randy Paul
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12/10/2002
04:00:03
RE: Gringo's guide to Brazil !
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Down to Earth:

Be sure to keep that sentiment in mind next time you're at a futebol game.


Robin
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12/10/2002
08:59:19
RE: Gringo's guide to Brazil !
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Patinho,

I just posted this, because I found it kinda funny... I copied it directly from a Salvador homepage www.bahia-online.net
By the way, I'm from Copenhagen, Denmark.



braslvr
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12/10/2002
10:38:08
RE: Gringo's guide to Brazil !
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Actually very accurate observations. Especially the backpacks, LOL. They should cut off one of the straps to save weight.

I would add that the trend towards longer shorts is a fairly recent one. 4 or 5 years ago short shorts were a common sight. Never cut-offs though.

The other thing you almost never see Brazilians wear are the Teva type sport sandles. However, I think this is mainly because of lack of availability. Several friends have seen mine and asked that I ship/bring some over, which I've done.


Adrianerik
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12/10/2002
10:56:31
RE: Gringo's guide to Brazil !
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Do NOT call the waiters "GARCON!" no matter how many times you've seen Humphrey Bogart do it.

Do not try to Samba with a Brazilian girl with big hips.

And if you do..... don't not touch the hips of a Brazilian girl while she is doing the Samba.

Do not watch Ballet Folklorico do Bahia stone-faced. Clap along with the rhythms.




Down to Earth
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12/10/2002
13:49:26
RE: Gringo's guide to Brazil !
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If you are staying away from the “obvious touristy areas” in Brazil at Brazilian friends’ house in Brazil, or if you are living in your own premises with servants do not openly flirt with the “them”. Do not thank the empregada for doing anything for not even cooking you a nice meal. Expect them to wash your “knickers” and dirty socks. Do not use the same bathroom as she or any other employee’s do and do not treat them as equals. Treat them like second-class citizens, kindly but firmly and make sure you patronize them so that they know their place. Make sure that you are always moaning/laughing about her laziness and the absurdity of their desire to go to university or have some time off work. Remind them of the possibility of going back to the streets/slums every time they become too comfortable around you.


brazzaboy
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12/10/2002
14:07:08
RE: Gringo's guide to Brazil !
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Are you serious D2E. I would have great trouble in that scenario as if someone does a good job I thank them and let them know.


Anonymous
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12/11/2002
09:46:19
RE: Gringo's guide to Brazil !
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don't wear cacky shorts with a t-shirt written in english. You'll get robbed at gunpoint like I was.


Jenn
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12/11/2002
12:15:43
RE: Gringo's guide to Brazil !
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D2E,
What kind of person are you?
What, you think you are better
than the person who is doing your
chores? It's their job. They are
doing it to earn a living and not
to have an inconsiderate (and from
what you said in this post; despicable)
scumbag treat them like if they were
worthless.

I hope you are not American because if you
are, you are an embarrassment to all of us!!!


Jenn
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12/11/2002
12:15:48
RE: Gringo's guide to Brazil !
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D2E,
What kind of person are you?
What, you think you are better
than the person who is doing your
chores? It's their job. They are
doing it to earn a living and not
to have an inconsiderate (and from
what you said in this post; despicable)
scumbag treat them like if they were
worthless.

I hope you are not American because if you
are, you are an embarrassment to all of us!!!


Monsieur Droit
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12/11/2002
13:45:31
RE: Gringo's guide to Brazil !
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Calm down, peoples

Can't you see DtE is a born teaser and provocateuse? Don't they teach irony as a figure of speech in schools anymore?

From The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001.

irony


figure of speech in which what is stated is not what is meant. The user of irony assumes that his reader or listener understands the concealed meaning of his statement. Perhaps the simplest form of irony is rhetorical irony, when, for effect, a speaker says the direct opposite of what she means. Thus, in Shakespeare’s Julius Caesar, when Mark Antony refers in his funeral oration to Brutus and his fellow assassins as “honorable men” he is really saying that they are totally dishonorable and not to be trusted. Dramatic irony occurs in a play when the audience knows facts of which the characters in the play are ignorant. The most sustained example of dramatic irony is undoubtedly Sophocles’ Oedipus Rex, in which Oedipus searches to find the murderer of the former king of Thebes, only to discover that it is himself, a fact the audience has known all along.





Jenn
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12/11/2002
13:55:23
RE: Gringo's guide to Brazil !
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Monsieur Droit,

I would have no greater joy if D2E is only being ironic.


Monsieur Droit
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12/11/2002
14:04:25
RE: Gringo's guide to Brazil !
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How do I know she's being ironic, Jenn?
Look at all her past interventions. And they have been plentiful.




brazzaboy
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12/12/2002
03:17:27
RE: Gringo's guide to Brazil !
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I hope you are right Mons.Droit, but the fact is that many wealthy Brasilians who do have servants treat them exactly that way. Could be she's not being playful this time?


Anonymous
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12/12/2002
15:46:41
RE: Gringo's guide to Brazil !
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Actually my family and friends in Salvador da Bahia, have servants in their homes, but they don't treat them like shit. They don't encourage me, "to be too nice to them, though."
Being a happy go lucky Aussie, "it's not in my nature, to look down on them."
When I visit Brasil, I always take old articles of clothing and gifts to give to them and their children, but never give them money.


Sick
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12/12/2002
19:42:44
RE: Gringo's guide to Brazil !
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The key to irony is that it makes a point. Otherwise, it's just sarcasm.

For the clueless, that is a hint.


brazzaboy
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12/13/2002
04:58:37
RE: Gringo's guide to Brazil !
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You mean clueless like yourself or sarcastic like yourself.


brazzagirl
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12/18/2002
04:29:38
RE: Gringo's guide to Brazil !
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look who's talking.......


Down to Earth
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12/18/2002
05:12:08
Speechless
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Thank you ever so much “Monsieur Droit” for enlightening these sorry souls in this topic. Myyyy haven’t you people got any sense of irony?

Jenn: Did anyone hit you with a stupid stick lately?

Brazzaboy: If you want to behave like a true average small town “middle class” Brazilian do exactly as I said, as long as you don’t mind being a heartless, selfish, superficial, lazy, rude, pretencious, backward sponger.



brazzaboy
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12/18/2002
05:53:32
RE: Gringo's guide to Brazil !
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Oh Sicky or is it SUCKY you really are a loser.


Jenni
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12/18/2002
08:11:16
RE: Gringo's guide to Brazil !
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Message:
Down to earth,
I think the stick flew by
me and catch your head!!!

Instead of clarifyng that you were
only being sarcastic, you opted to
respond in a way that left no room
for explanation on your character.

You should be glad that someone actually
cares how they treat people in Brazil.

Be careful with those 'stupid' sticks.
I see they really did damage to you!




viewer
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12/18/2002
08:20:46
RE: Gringo's guide to Brazil !
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Down to Earth is a cunt.


brazzaboy
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12/18/2002
08:50:27
RE: Gringo's guide to Brazil !
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Actually she has some very good and useful insight and thoughts most of the time. I really think her comments in her last post were sarcastic to really hit home on sick.

The truth now d2e.


Down to Earth
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12/18/2002
10:30:45
That's so impressive...
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Jenni, I am not going to post explanations after each post I write so as to allow for those who take that “little bit longer” to understand than most people.

What about you? Instead of making assumptions and throwing insults at people because you can’t understand their posts why don’t you make an effort and ask about it? Try to understand?

I assume that you are Brazilian by the way you express yourself in English (unless my thoughts on the stupid stick are truly confirmed), in which case if you care that much about how people are treated around you, spend less time getting all “assy” in Internet forums and stand up to those who actually do “mistreat” servants.

Viewer: that was really, really deep…you’ve got hummm…a point here, it would be quite useful if you try to back/explain it next time, being such an intellectual arguer obviously…

Brazzaboy thx for backing, unfortunately it looks like we will have to start to really simplify things around here if we ever want to get anything across these people.



Jenni
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12/18/2002
11:16:43
RE: Gringo's guide to Brazil !
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D2E,
You have no idea what I do or don't
do to help those mistreated, so
stop making assumptions!

Was it hard for you to let me know that
you were just being sarcastic? I've read
some of your other posts and you seem like
a sensible person. I don't think it would
of been too much of a sacrifice for you to
clarify things.

Also, that comment about assuming
that I am Brazilian because of the
(bad?) way I express myself in
English, that just proves my point!



Reader
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12/18/2002
11:58:19
RE: Gringo's guide to Brazil !
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Maybe we all need a little listening ability.

Just a few messages above, Jenn remarked:

"hope you are not American because if you
are, you are an embarrassment to all of us!!!"

It doesn't seem she is Brazilian. As for the occasional misconjugation or typo we all are guilty.

Feliz Natal



egads
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12/18/2002
13:45:48
RE: Gringo's guide to Brazil !
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down to earth doesn't have time to listen because she is too
busy hearing herself talk!!!!!!!


brazzaboy
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12/18/2002
16:41:53
RE: Gringo's guide to Brazil !
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Jenn chill a bit here, you sound like a real decent person. I, too, was fooled at first by D2E as she can be quite serious in her discussions, (read other threads), but she is also a decent person. The two of you would probably get along quite well in fact. Instead of throwing barbs at each other (there are plenty of slime in this forum for that) let's try understand each other. I speak for myself also here. I am starting to get to know d2e a lot better. Give it time.


braslvr
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12/18/2002
22:46:22
Here's an even better idea...
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Wouldn't it be cool if we could sort of stay on topic?

This thread had the possibility of being a really good one.

Patinho and others; share your experiences regarding do's and dont's. Haven't we all made stupid mistakes on our first visits to Brasil?






Down to Earth
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12/19/2002
05:20:53
This is soooo boring!
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Jenni I give up, just do me a favour, don’t reply to any of my posts in case you “misunderstood them”, especially when I’m actually talking about “my country” of which I can at least say I know more about it than you do. You obviously know now (I truly hope) that I was being ironic so why continue to argue??

“Jenni says: Was it hard for you to let me know that you were just being sarcastic?”

Well it is very hard to try to helpful with a person who’s in first reply to you is already calling you a “despicable scumbag”. As I said, I would not start to explain my posts to people whose tendency is get emotional (on assumptions they make) rather than (politely) inquisitive.

“Jenni: Also, that comment about assuming that I am Brazilian because of the (bad?) way I express myself in English, that just proves my point!”

I don’t know what point it proves; many people here are Brazilian (including myself) and there is a possibility that you could have been also, in which case I thought that even with all your fuss about my post it was quite good to see someone who feels about domestic employees’s working conditions in Brazil. A few things you wrote don’t come across as the usual typo’s and punctuation errors like “clarifyng” but more of someone who is still learning or experimenting with expressions like “I think the stick flew by me and catch your head!!!” and “respond in a way that left no room for explanation on your character”. But I mean, who cares!

I guess that insulting someone first thing, without trying to understand leaves a lot of room for “explanation on your character” and is not making any assumptions at all. Anyway, now you better go off and pick on someone else because it looks like you are try to get into a “he says, she says” dispute. I just can’t be bothered with that!! So, good luck to you.

Braslvr, I would like to continue the topic as well but now I’m afraid to make people upset or even worse make them cry or something. Why don’t you give it a go and will take it from there.



Jenni
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12/19/2002
06:25:24
RE: Gringo's guide to Brazil !
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D2E,
I have read a few other posts to know that I am not the only person who has this opinion about you. I have now understood that there is no need to try to clarify things with you. Is to no avail.

For someone that dosen't want to be bothered, gee...you seem to respond to all of MY posts! So, if you want to drop it, then drop it!


Patinho
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12/20/2002
01:20:02
RE: Gringo's guide to Brazil !
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Braslvr-

let me try.

Watch out for the waiters, it's their job to try and hustle you. Did your party order 6 Cokes or 9... better make sure! Nothing against Brazilian waiters... but on my first trip, (i knew very little Portuguese) I asked my freind why she argued with the waiters after nearly every meal. She told me they often tried to overcharge when people ate in large groups.

Also, "free refills" is an American concept, I have never heard of this in Brazil, not even at McDonald's.

If you have a Brazilian freind with your travels, let them buy souvenirs for you, so the price doesn't sky rocket. Same goes for renting a "bugre" on the beach, just sit in the car, shut up, and let your freind to the deal making.

Has anyone figured out how to get hot water in a shower?! After 3 trips I still have not mastered that one. hehe Maybe my freind's house was just different.

Carry pocket change. The street kids are everywhere. Don't be afraid to give a little more than the locals. It is common to give 5 or 10 cents for a service, but I always gave a whole Real, hell... I'm on vacation, I've got the extra money to spend, and it just might make that kid's day better.

When on the beach, if you happen to handle lemons.. wash your hands!! My freinds told me to do that because it would leave a black mark on my hands. Now, never EVER hearing this... I just kind of smiled and thought "oh, silly Brazilians". A day later I had a hideous course black mark on my cheek. I learned my lesson. Still, when I got back... I asked all my freinds and none of them had ever heard this either. Go figure.

Stay out of conversations involving Politics and Soccer... it's just not worth it.

Try not to stare at the amazing women for too long.(Especially if there's a big guy standing beside her) I am still trying to get this one down.

Eat at a Rodizio. You'll never forget it. Also, it's fun to play with the waiters.... red!, green!, red!, green!, red!, green!..... the fun never ends!

Some people speak english... be careful what you say and watch your language around the ladies. This is just good manners.

ok... that's all I have for now.... hope you enjoy them.


USCIT
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12/20/2002
10:02:40
RE: Gringo's guide to Brazil !
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No idea, of course, how it is in your friends house, but with other travels in other places; one frequently has to go down and light the fire to heat the water before showering. The water heater may be wood burning, coal burning, gas burning (not lit) or whatver the energy source, but the first thing that needs happen is that one light the fire, heat the water, 'then' shower. Then turn the heat off.


Down to Earth
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12/20/2002
10:15:33
RE: Gringo's guide to Brazil !
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One thing I remember is that in Brazil all the showers (at least all the ones I’ve used) were electric and sometimes there might be a light short circuit, especially when it rains. So we were told by our parents to wear rubber flip-flops when showering if it was raining outside.

Another thing I’m not sure I remember well but I believe it’s fact, a lot of restaurants charge you by food weight. So the heavier your plate is, the more they will charge. Also restaurants are like in Europe they expect you to take your time, so don’t be surprised if your mates take nearly half a day for a meal, nobody will ask you to leave.

Another thing that came across when I went to visit Brazil in 91 is how people stare at each other, they are not afraid to take a good look at you so don’t be nervous unless as Patinho said the woman/man you are looking at is accompanied by his bf or gf in there case, there might be trouble especially as it seems that Brazilians flirt single/married or not.



braslvr
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12/20/2002
10:23:48
RE: Gringo's guide to Brazil !
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Patinho,
In the Northeast, where I believe you spend your time, it is VERY common to not have hot water in the shower, especially in private homes. The water usually sits in a box (caixa de agua) on the roof in the sun, and while not "hot" is actually pleasant once you get used to it.

The cheapest pousadas/hotels will also be like this. The mid-range places usually have an electric gizmo mounted on the shower head. They work fine, but always a bit un-nerving as 220 volts + wet body standing on wet floor = possible problem.

The higher end hotels most often will have piped hot water (two faucets/adjustable).



Guest


12/20/2002
11:08:26
RE: Gringo's guide to Brazil !
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I've almost forgot how to heat the water at home, it is unthinkable to take one with this weather.


Robin
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12/20/2002
15:34:07
RE: Gringo's guide to Brazil !
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Braslvr !

Thanks for putting this thread back on track.
I'm going to Salvador Bahia, for the first time, end of this year.
I really like all those small advices, like bringing small change in your pocket, for the streetkids, when you go out.

When you travel I think it's very important to be relaxed and spred good vibes. If you look paranoid and look down for your wallet every 2nd minute...thats a killer.

5 years ago I was on the island Tobago and I was walking down a street in the nighttime and 3 guys said hello, but A car that passed me, blinded me with the headlights, so i hold my head down and did'nt say hello. So suddenly the 3 guys came close up to me and tried to rob me, but I ran and got away from them.
I'm sure if I had just said hello and held my head up high, nothing would had happened. I guess it made me look weak.

Robin.


Patinho
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12/20/2002
17:22:24
RE: Gringo's guide to Brazil !
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The "water on the roof" makes sense now that I think about it.

But I still don't know. I think perhaps the showers were "cold" compared to what I am used to in the US. As stated earlier... it's so hot in the Nordeste all the time, that there is little need for hot water.

However... when I visited Parnaiba, a small beach town on the northern coast, the water in the apartments there was so cold I think they chilled it. Folks.. I am talking about painfully cold. Like a bucket of ice water being poured on you for 5 minutes.

hehe... maybe no one cares about this really... but it always brings a smile to my face (now that it's over). I had to tell someone....


braslvr
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12/20/2002
17:26:23
RE: Gringo's guide to Brazil !
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I've never had any problem with being assaulted/robbed anywhere I've been in Brazil.(including 3 months in centro do Sao Paulo) I do agree that your mannerisms affect this. I never carry anything I'm afraid to lose or give up in a split second. I believe my confidence shows.

Regarding Brazilian waiters......
I've never experienced the problems Patinho describes, BUT.....

The first place I went in Brazil over 5 years ago was Recife. I was thrown suddenly into Brazil(for work), and had no time to prepare in any way.

Advised by my company to stay in my hotel at night. Very dangerous on the street!!

HA!! Not a chance. Even as a totally naive gringo, I was in the happenning area quickly. Almost immediately met up with a table full of German ex-pats whom all spoke both English and Portuguese. They proceeded to fill me in on everything. We had a great time eating and drinking until the wee hours of the morning. They gradually left, and suddenly I was alone. ALONE TO PAY THE WHOLE FREAKIN TAB FOR THE NIGHT!

Nothing against Germans in general. This was just a group of bad guys that I'm sure had this scam down to a science.

This was when I decided I needed to learn some basic Portuguese QUICK.

Since that night, I've never once had anyone try to scam me in Brazil. And now, I can wheel and deal with the best of em.


brazzaboy
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12/20/2002
17:27:27
RE: Gringo's guide to Brazil !
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Giving street kids change is not the best. 50 cents buys them their bag of glue, best to buy them a juice or something to eat. This was the advice I got from people in Sao Paulo. I learned the hard way. Second day in Sao Paulo I went exploring, cam across a young boy9 or 10) in a doorway with his bag of glue. I gave him 1 real he hardly had the strenghth to raise his arms. The next morning I went in search of this kid. To my horror there he was lying in the middle of the sidewalk as dead as can be. From that time on I bought food, juice, etc never gave them money.


Down to Earth
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12/21/2002
11:19:42
RE: Gringo's guide to Brazil !
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That’s horrible brazzilboy, I should definitely remember that tip. But I also remember something else, if street kids ask you if they could keep an eye on your parked car for you say yes and when you come back, give them a reward for it (sweets/food etc…) otherwise if you say no, you are likely to find your tires/radio/belongings or car gone when you come back.


brazzaboy
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12/21/2002
12:02:55
RE: Gringo's guide to Brazil !
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As I remember there were never street kids looking after parked cars. They were all much older men and yes you better pay them. Most in fact took the money before you parked as they would not let you park other wise. Negotitions were aplenty. They ask for 5 reals you say no more than 1 they always settled for that, and your car was safe when you returned.


USCIT
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12/21/2002
12:52:36
RE: Gringo's guide to Brazil !
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Getting back to the showers. Most specifically those with the heater element in the shower head. Has anyone here been hit with an electrical shock by one of those things? How did it affect you? I've heard of them, but have never seen one.

A separate incident. Walking across a wet metal deck one time my shoulder brushed against the filaments of a broken light bulb. (DC voltage, low ampherage.) As I dangled there twitching like a fish on a string, I recall 4 thoughts. The first was, "Oh Shit" The second was, "This is asinine." The third was, "I wonder if this can stop my heart?" The fourth and final before the circuit breaker blew was, "How in the Hell do I get away from this thing?" When I did finally drop free my nerves were shot. I felt very weak, but at the same time strangly enervated.

I'm wondering if others have experienced similar, how they reacted and how they felt afterward.

PS. Personal preference. Even here in the land of icycles and blizzards, in the summertime I use a black container on the roof to heat water with solar.


Gordon R.
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12/21/2002
14:30:14
RE: Gringo's guide to Brazil !
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by the way, are shower curtains used in brazil? i have been to brazil once and the three places i stayed (two were homes) did not have shower curtains. water, everywhere.

Gordon R.


braslvr
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12/21/2002
19:45:09
RE: Gringo's guide to Brazil !
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The norm, again in the Northeast, is the shower showers everything in the bathroom. Toilet, sink, etc.

The other different thing is that most all public restrooms have a shower.(again usually right over the urinal or toilet) Nordestinos love their showers. 4 or 5 per day is not uncommon.


Patinho
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12/22/2002
00:25:33
RE: Gringo's guide to Brazil !
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Braslvr and Gordon-

I have never seen a shower in the Nordeste WITHOUT a shower curtain. Actually, not a curtain, but they all had sliding doors.

Ironic...

USCIT-

I walked into an electrical wire that ran atop a 4 foot fence to keep dogs from jumping over it. Felt like my brain bounced around my head at super speed...
Also I stuck a knife in an electrical outlet when I was 9...
But I'm ok now, now, now, now, now, won, own, nwo, now, wno...... shit! there it goes again! what it that?!


braslvr
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12/22/2002
11:37:02
RE: Gringo's guide to Brazil !
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>I have never seen a shower in the Nordeste WITHOUT a shower curtain. Actually, not a curtain, but they all had sliding doors.

Ok, you got me thinking.....

In Natal;
Once stayed 2 nights in mid priced hotel (R160,00). Had shower doors and piped hot water.
My favorite (and usual) pousada (R85,00), does have shower doors in most rooms.
5 other pousadas I've stayed in (R30,00-R90,00) did not have curtains.
Been in 4 private homes, only one has a curtain.(also had the only tub I've seen in the Nordeste)

In Fortaleza, my hotel (R90,00) did not have.
In Jericoacoara, my pousada did not have.
In Assu and Ipanguacu; Neither of the two pousadas have curtains. Been in over 10 private homes, none had curtains.

In Ponta Negra, Genipabu, Pipa, and every other coastal town nearby, virtually every public restroom (bars and restaurants) has a shower tap on the wall which sprays on the toilet and/or sink.

Most all restrooms are made for this being completely built with ceramic tile or concrete.


Here's another one.....
Availability of toilet paper in public restrooms.
Still about 50-50 overall, but getting better in Ponta Negra as more tourists come.




Jo
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12/23/2002
04:04:08
RE: Gringo's guide to Brazil !
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I've been in lots of private homes, pousadas, convents recently, and I've not seen any showers without a door or a curtain that I remember except, perhaps at one beach house, come to think of it. Haven't seen a bathtub in the NE yet.

I've been shocked twice, though, by those lovely water-heating gizmos. The first time I actually touched the thing not really understanding what it was...made me scream but didn't blow a circuit or die. The second time was at a simple hotel in Campina Grande where the electricity somehow leaked into the wall, and when you touched the metal to turn the water off or on you got a mild shock. Definitely not as bad as the first time. I think wearing flipflops--Havianas is a good idea.


Fernando B
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12/26/2002
14:58:37
RE: Gringo's guide to Brazil !
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The problem is they ground the electric wires using the water pipes. When taking a shower with that heating gizmo (aquecedor a gás) gas water heater, keep a open window, because if it has a gas leak and if you like to forget life in the shower you can be dead at the end.


Brazilian Girl
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1/05/2003
08:56:59
RE: Gringo's guide to Brazil !
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Oh, and something for the girls!
PLease do not use flower prints of any kind, it is tacky! Do not use huge cotton shorts and sandals, makes you look fat and again, tacky. Try the very basic style if you are not sure, jeans (it can even been a man's cut) and t-shirt, you go pretty much anywhere. If you are going to a fancy place, a black, sequin dress is perfect. It doens't take space in your bagpack (I have bagpacked before, so trust me) and black sandals, and they don't even need to be high heels.
DO NOT. DO NOT use tons of make up, brazilian girls barely use any make up, it makes you look like a wh*re or to say the least like Mimi (Drew Carey's Show).
And Please, FOR GERMANS (NOT PICKING ON YOU) EUROPEANS IN GENERALS, PLEASE SHOWERS AT LEAST ONCE A DAY AND USE DEhODORANT!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
The biggest complaint about foreing people is the peculiar smell! Deodorant for the armpits, and water, lots of water and soap for the body!
Not allowed to put perfum on only! Shower is a must!! Do not use the same t-shirt twice, please wash them, even with the hotel soap, or any cheap soap at the supermarket, wash in the sink let it dry till the next morning.


Brazilian Girl
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1/05/2003
09:00:54
RE: Gringo's guide to Brazil !
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D2E you r an asshole!
If you don't thank and behave like they are slaves they are going to spit in your food and jerk off on your doughnut! But I believe you already knew that, right D2E?! Or not?!


tmone
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1/09/2003
04:01:53
RE: Gringo's guide to Brazil !
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what the deal with the druug scene over there? i am going to rio in feb. is it easy to get some blow over there? how much for a gram over there?


amg1
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1/24/2003
14:29:08
RE: Gringo's guide to Brazil !
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No one mentioned not to slam taxi cab doors but close them gently, (they tend to think your mad otherwise). Also, you don't lick an ice cream cone, you're usually given a small plastic spoon, (there's something sexual about that I guess, at least in Bahia). Try not to get stuck with 50 reais notes, their hard to spend as no one has change for them.

Also, as mentioned numerous times by others, don't touch anything made of metal while taking shower which you should do at least twice a day or you will be thought of as an unclean slob.

As for the last entry, For you blow is cheap in all parts of Brasil. It will probably only cost you what the rest of your life is worth, which doesn't sound like very much.


rags
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1/25/2003
08:38:31
RE: Gringo's guide to Brazil !
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Coconut stains on your clothes. For some reason if you spill coconut juice on your clothes it will result in a big stain after it is washed. Never had this problem with coconuts in other countries so i think it is something to do with the washing powder here. Took me quite a while to figure this out and not before just about all of my clothes have large coconut satins on them. I still wear the clothes, everyone seems to know what happened to them.


Jay
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2/07/2003
09:47:18
RE: Gringo's guide to Brazil !
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beautiful tropical isle pics...

www.kauai-blue-lagoon.com


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