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Brazil and South Korea Promote UN Events on Non-Proliferation

A soldier from Brazil Brazil and South Korea kicked off on Tuesday, November 25, two United Nations disarmament events. They are part of the world body's efforts to promote the non-proliferation of weapons across the globe.

In the Brazilian city of São Paulo, UN's Office for Disarmament Affairs has organized a week-long workshop on implementing Security Council resolution 1540. That resolution, adopted by the Council in 2004, focuses on the non-proliferation of weapons of mass destruction.

The workshop aims to enhance national capacities for the management of export control processes at a practical level as well as to improve information and experience-sharing between national expert control and enforcement authorities.

Meanwhile the seventh annual Joint Conference on Disarmament and Non-proliferation issues, organized by the UN Office for Disarmament Affairs and South Korea, is taking place on Jeju Island.

This year's conference will focus on such concerns as revitalizing the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT) process, the nuclear renaissance, a multilateral assurance mechanism for nuclear fuel supply, and non-proliferation challenges in North-East Asia.

Some 40 representatives of governments, international organizations, academic and research institutions, as well as civil society are expected to participate.

The annual event, which has been hosted by South Korea since 2002, is a forum for dialogue and the exchange of views on pressing security and disarmament-related issues facing the international community, addressing particular disarmament and non-proliferation concerns in the Asia-Pacific region.

Acknowledging that obstacles to nuclear disarmament are daunting, Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon said last month that it is more imperative than ever to make it a reality given the twin economic and financial crises the world is currently facing.

"The costs and risks of [disarmament's] alternatives never get the attention they deserve," Mr. Ban said in his address to the East-West Institute in New York. "But consider the tremendous opportunity cost of huge military budgets. Consider the vast resources that are consumed by the endless pursuit of military superiority."

The market turmoil and other crises have triggered an increasing awareness of the need for international cooperation to tackle global problems, he said. "This changing consciousness can also help us revitalize the international disarmament agenda."

There is support worldwide for the idea that nuclear arms should never be utilized again due to their horrific effects, environmental impacts and repercussions on security, but since disarmament has yet to be achieved, "this forces us to ask whether a taboo merely on the use of such weapons is sufficient," the Secretary-General said.

Many nations consider nuclear weapons to be a status symbol, with some viewing them as a deterrent, he said.

"Unfortunately, the doctrine of nuclear deterrence has proven to be contagious. This has made non-proliferation more difficult, which in turn raises new risks that nuclear weapons will be used."

Mr. Ban also voiced concern that a "nuclear renaissance" could occur since nuclear power is seen as a clean alternative to combat climate change.

In his speech, he offered five proposals to reinvigorate the international push towards disarmament.

All parties to the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) must fulfil their obligations under the pact, the Security Council's five permanent members should start talks on the disarmament process, and strengthening laws to promote non-proliferation.

He also called for greater accountability and transparency, as well as complementary measures, such as eliminating other types of weapons of mass destruction.

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  • falupa

    Nuclear proliferation is not possible anymore unfortunately. When a nation has a nuclear arsenal, there is no way they are going to give up those weapons, especially when countries like the U.S. have so many nukes and they aren’t giving them up. I think the best way to get rid of nuclear weapons completely would be to set an example. This is the only way that the UN is going to get everyone to completely rid the world of nuclear weapons.

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