After 21-Year Wait Brazil Congress to Pass Regulation on Right to Information

A news stand in Brazil The President of Brazil, Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva, sent last week the long-awaited draft Access to Information Bill to the Brazilian National Congress. This is an important development that gives concrete form to the federal government's stated commitment to adopt specific right to information legislation.

The bill seeks to implement Article 5 of the 1988 Brazilian Constitution, which guarantees the right to information.

The draft bill fulfils a commitment made by President Lula during his campaign for re-election in 2006, as well as historical demands by a range of civil society actors that have been calling for legislation to give proper effect to the constitutional guarantee. The bill will now be reviewed by the two houses of Congress.

The bill includes a number of positive measures, such as a list of information that must be disseminated on a proactive basis by public bodies, an obligation to respond to requests for information within 20 days, and coverage of information held not only by the executive, but also the legislative and the judicial branches of government.

However, the text could still be significantly improved. A key problem is the failure of the bill to establish an independent administrative oversight body to handle complaints and to promote effective implementation of the new law, a measure that has proven essential to successful opening up of government in other countries.

International organization Article 19, which promotes freedom of expression worldwide, released a note saying that it welcomes the Brazilian government initiative as an important step towards promoting greater transparency in government.

It lamented however that a piece of legislation designed to promote greater participation was not the subject of broad consultation with citizens and civil society organizations before being sent to Congress.

The group called on the Brazilian Congress to make sure that there is extensive consultation with the public before the bill is passed into law. It also urged Brazilian parliamentarians to ensure that the law which is adopted complies with international standards.

Tags:

  • Show Comments (0)

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

comment *

  • name *

  • email *

  • website *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Ads

You May Also Like

Invitation to Brazilian Dance

The old dance hall isn’t dead. Anyone who has watched the Mexican film Danzón ...

Iraq Has Plenty of Money and Wishes to Do Business with Brazil

The Kurdistan DBX Trade Show began Tuesday, November 11, in Suleimaniya, in Northern Iraq, ...

Brazil Praises Encounter Between Lula and EC President

Brazil’s Minister of Finance, Antônio Palocci, said that the  Janunary 28 meeting between Brazilian ...

Brazil’s Petrobras Invests US$ 16 Bi Seeking Self-Sufficiency in Gas

Brazilian oil giant Petrobras intends to invest US$ 16 billion in the gas sector ...

Best-seller Books, Plays and Movies

By Brazzil Magazine RIO Mamãe Não Pode Saber (Mom Cannot Know)—Comedy. Family deep in ...

Brazil Chooses Miss Bumbum, a Tribute to the Country’s Favorite Female Anatomy Part

Hundreds of Brazilian women turned out for the Miss Bumbum “best buttock” competition. “These ...

China Ready to Invest US$ 8 Bi in Brazil While Brazilians Wish to Diversify Exports to Chinese

Brazil’s Minister of Development, Industry and Foreign Trade, Fernando Pimentel, says that China will ...

Brazilian Presidential Candidate Serra: a Life of Opposition and Solid Education

Brazilian presidential candidate José Serra was born into a working-class family of Italian immigrants ...

Paraguay Rejects Brazil’s Offer and Insists on Fair Price for Electricity

Brazil's proposals regarding the non renegotiation of the Itaipu treaty was rejected by the ...