Amazon Countries Gather in Brazil But Can’t Reach Concrete Proposal

Lula in the Amazon Gathered in Brazil, nine nations in the Amazon region have called on rich countries to provide poorer nations with the funds to preserve forests. The nations, meeting in Manaus, Brazil, also discussed supporting a 40% reduction in global emissions by 2020.

The meeting comes shortly before the key global summit on climate change in Copenhagen, Denmark. The Amazon nations agreed on broad principles rather than concrete steps, correspondents said.

Brazilian President Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva chaired the meeting of delegates from Bolivia, Colombia, Ecuador, Guyana, Peru, Venezuela and Surinam, with French President Nicolas Sarkozy representing French Guiana.

Presidents Sarkozy and Lula da Silva said richer nations must increase their aid to help the poorer countries fight global warming.

"The poor need to be supported without any country giving up its sovereignty," President Lula said.

The BBC's Paulo Cabral reports from Manaus that for the past few days diplomats have been negotiating a common position to be presented by the Amazon countries and France at the conference in Copenhagen.

The common statement agreed in Brazil establishes broad principles rather than fresh or concrete proposals, he adds.

He says most of the presidents invited did not come to Manaus, though diplomats say that the ministers and ambassadors sent in their place were in a position to close a deal.

Brazil proposed fighting deforestation in the Amazon basin with financial backing from wealthy nations.

"Let no gringo ask us to let an Amazonian starve to death under a tree," Lula da Silva said in a speech ahead of the meeting.

"We want to preserve the forests, but other countries have to pay for that preservation."

At the summit, the Brazilian government presented its efforts to reduce destruction in the Amazon as a key part of its strategy to combat climate change.

Earlier this month, Brazil's government said the rate of deforestation in the Amazon had dropped by 45% – and was the lowest on record since monitoring began 21 years ago.

It said that just over 7,000 sq km had been destroyed between July 2008 and August 2009. Brazil is seeking an 80% reduction in the deforestation rate by 2020.

The environmental group Greenpeace has welcomed the latest drop but says there is still too much destruction in the rainforest. Earlier this month, Brazil said it aimed to cut its carbon emissions by at least 36% below 1990 levels by 2020

Mercopress

Tags:

Ads

You May Also Like

Oil Gives Rio a Boost Taking Brazil’s State Out of the Red

The good result in the trade balance of southeastern Brazilian state of Rio de ...

With 400 Feared Killed by Rains, Rio’s Governor Blames All of Society for Tragedy

With rescuers racing against time amid fading hopes of finding survivors of a huge ...

Mass Killings by Drug Gang Don’t Worry Brazilian Investors

Latin American stocks tumbled as investors continued to take profits amid worries about rising ...

Probe Reporter Talks About ‘Glaring Evidence’ of Scam in Brazil’s Ruling Workers Party

The reporter of the Joint Parliamentary Investigation Commission (CPMI) on Vote-Buying, Deputy Ibrahim Abi-Ackel ...

Ghanaians Resort to Shrink and Prayers While Getting Ready for Brazil

Defending champion Brazil is bracing for a tricky match against Ghana in the second ...

Bring the Brains Back

The strength of the real, and lower tariffs among other things, are making Brazil ...

After 9% Growth in 2007, Construction in Brazil to Expand 10% This Year

Brazil's civil construction sector grew 9% last year and should grow another 10% this ...

Better Control Brings 14% More Tax Money to Brazil Treasury

From January until May this year, the Brazilian federal government collected, in taxes and ...

Brazil’s Finance Minister Promises Long Cycle of Growth

In testimony before the Brazilian Senate Economic Affairs Commission (CAE), Brazil’s Minister of Finance, ...