• Categories
  • Archives

Lula’s Life Becomes a Super-Production Movie Premiering this January 1st

Diaz as Lula in Lula, the Son of Brazil The story of a former lathe operator who became union leader and for three times ran as presidential candidate until becoming in 2002 the Brazilian president is premiering this first of the year in 400 theaters all across Brazil.

“Lula, the Son of Brazil” was preceded by a series of ads on billboards, radio, prime-time TV and Brazil’s” leading newspapers.

“You know who this man is but still don’t know his history,” said the text of a full-page ad appearing on New Year’s Eve in all major Brazilian newspapers.

The film is based on the authorized biography of the president written by Brazilian journalist and historian Denise Paraná

“In 1992 I decided to do my doctoral thesis on Lula,” she told Isto É news magazine. “I told him I would like to know what clay he was made of. He agreed to give interviews and allowed my access to his family. There was no analysis that sought to understand his character, although understanding Lula is essential to understand the history of contemporary Brazil.

“I have advised his campaign in 1989 and worked with Lula in the parallel government since 1990. I was impressed with his unusual intelligence coupled with a powerful intuition. He has a unique way to reason, to go beyond, to achieve what few achieve. Hi is a unique self-taught person.”

Actress Glória Pires, a Globo TV star famous for her soap opera roles, who plays Dona Lindu, Lula’s late mother, came out in defense of the film after some critics called it political propaganda. 2010 is a presidential election year and Lula has already chosen his candidate (chief of staff Dilma Rousseff) although he is not a candidate himself.

“The film is not political,” said Pires. “This whole thing people are talking about is nothing but speculation. This is not the real purpose of the film.”

According to the actress, the film by director Fábio Barreto is, above all, a heartwarming story.

“The aim of conveying a message of resilience is accomplished. Everyone who sees it gets involved with the film and leaves the theater moved. I got extremely moved myself. I am very happy with the result.”

Barreto in 1995 directed O Quatrilho, the first Brazilian movie nominated for an Oscar for Best Foreign Language Film since O Pagador de Promessas, from 1962. He is now in serious condition in a Rio hospital after being involved in a car accident on December 19 in Botafogo, a neighborhood in the south side of Rio de Janeiro.

Lula as an adult is played by the virtually unknown actor Rui Ricardo Diaz who comes from the stage. He plays Lula during his years as union leader in the industrial belt of São Paulo, the ABCD, the region where he moved to as a child after migrating from the Northeast.

The actor also says the film is not political: “It’s just the life story of a great Brazilian.”

He admits being a great admirer of Lula: “He is a historical figure, he has a spectacular life trajectory. I always thought him to be an incredible guy, and the film showed me a side of his life I didn’t know.”

Diaz commented on the episode in which Lula’s first wife, Maria de Lurdes (Cleo Pires) and their first child die: “They died during childbirth. When I heard this story I thought, ‘I do not believe this guy had the strength to continue.’ But he went on, he is persistent.”

Talking about the scene that shows the accident in which Lula loses a finger at work, Rui says, “It was emotionally very intense. To make it more credible we use camera techniques.”

Lula, the Son of Brazil, lasts 130 minutes and it cost about US$ 10 million, one of the most expensive movies ever shot in Brazil.

Luis Carlos Barreto, the film’s producer and the director’s father, is betting high on the movie’s success. He also produced Dona Flor and Her Two Husbands, the most watched film in Brazilian history.

The producer says he expects 20 million people will come to see the movie. To bring in more people Lula, the Son of Brazil will also be screened in unions, churches and community centers at promotional prices.

Tags:

  • Show Comments (3)

  • Beto González

    response to Andrade
    I too, my dear Andrade, am proud that in Brazil we can elect a lathe operator as President. But please don’t be so naive to think that Brazil is so democratic. We might very well elect a woman to be the next president, but how long do you think it will be before we have Black President? Blacks are still a very small minority in universities, and even more so in high public office or the corporate world…

    So, please, until there are more black Brazilians getting “real” equal opportunities, don’t pat yourself on the back so much…

  • Andrade

    [quote]We might very well elect a woman to be the next president, but how long do you think it will be before we have Black President? [/quote]

    We don’t have to wait too long, my friend. It could be very well this year. Who knows, our next President could be Marina Silva who has declared herself to be a black lady. Wouldn’t be something if Brasil elects an ex-doméstica who got a diploma in latter part of her life,a woman and a black?

    As for your comment that Brasil is not so democratic, I politely disagree with you. It is not a police state either. At least we don’t have to remove our shoes, while going through the Airport security.

  • Andrade

    [quote]The story of a former lathe operator who became union leader and for three times ran as presidential candidate until becoming in 2002 the Brazilian president is premiering this first of the year in 400 theaters all across Brazil.[/quote]

    I suggest to all the Gringos in this blog to go see this movie to understand that in our country also, a Lathe Operator can be elected as the President.This country believes in Equal Opportunity Employment and I bet the next President is going to be a woman to prove this point.

    Whether the opponents of Lula like it or not, he was responsible for enhancing our country´s image overseas during the past almost 8 years. It is a pity that our constitution forbids him from continuing the good work beyond December 2010.

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

comment *

  • name *

  • email *

  • website *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Ads

You May Also Like

Brazil Opens First Maximum Security Prison at Cost of US$ 10 Million

Brazil’s Minister of Justice, Márcio Thomaz Bastos, and the director of the Department of ...

Brazil’s Kepler Weber Builds UAE’s Largest Storage Complex

The Kepler Weber Group, in the construction of storage infrastructure and warehouse equipment sector ...

São Paulo skyline

Brazil Grew, But Hasn’t Learned How to Flourish

The economists prefer the verb "grow" while the poets choose "flourish." The politicians sided ...

Saudis Open the Door Again to Brazil’s Factory

Pormade, a wooden door factory located in the city of União da Vitória, in ...

Brazil Ships 13,000 Live Cattle to Lebanon

Another 13,000 live cattle were embarked, Wednesday, November 2, from the port of Rio ...

Brazil Gets Ready for War Rearranging and Funding Its Defense Network

The Brazilian government announced this week the creation of an ambitious defense structure, to ...

Brazil to let dollar rise in face of real

Brazil Ready to Let Dollar Climb and Interests Fall

Brazil has named a strong critic of the country's Central Bank strict (and controversial) ...

Brazil Recalling Unlabeled Transgenics

Brazil’s Ministry of Justice ordered the impounding of genetically modified products that don’t carry ...

US to Buy Brazilian Military Planes to Use in Iraq

Embraer, a Brazilian airplane maker, is participating in preliminary negotiations to sell the US ...