• Categories
  • Archives

Brazil Celebrates 72% Drop in Deforestation, Credits It to Green Arch

Amazon reforestation An area of 247 square kilometers (95 square miles) of Brazilian rainforest was cut down in the months of October and November 2009, which may seem like a lot, but it was a significant drop in Amazon deforestation. 

In fact, it was 72.5% less than in October and November 2008. For the minister of Environment, Carlos Minc, the numbers were good news. And they were based on satellite images from the National Space Research Institute’s (Inpe) Real Time Deforestation Detection System (Deter).

The minister added that the satellite imaging had occurred during cloudless periods. “This time nobody can say we did not see the deforestation because of cloud cover,” said Minc.

“These are also the first figures after Operation Green Arch was implemented in the 43 municipalities with the highest rates of deforestation,” explained the minister. And the news was very good. During the first four months of the burning season, August, September, October and November, the reduction in deforestation was around 50% in the area.

The government says the drop in deforestation is due to joint inspection and control by the Environmental Protection Agency (Ibama), the Federal Police, Highway Police and the National Security Force.

Operation Green Arch is part of that effort but it also includes social assistance programs and attempts to provide local inhabitants viable alternative economic activities – that do not require chopping down trees.

Interestingly, the least amount of deforestation in the Amazon region that took place during October and November was in the state of Amazonas (a mere 33 square kilometers). The champion was the state of Pará (108 square km), followed by Mato Grosso (50 square km).

Amazonas is Brazil’s largest state: 1.57 million square kilometers; bigger than France, Spain, Sweden and Greece together, and 2.25 times bigger than Texas.

If it were a country it would be the world’s 18th biggest, coming in slightly larger than Mongolia. The population is 3 million. Pará is the second biggest state at 1.25 million square kilometers with a population of 6 million.

Minc says that at this rate Brazil will achieve its deforestation reduction goal before the year 2020, the year in the government’s proposed National Climate Change Policy paper when the reduction was to be 80%. “We could be down 95% by 2020,” declared Minc.

ABr

Tags:

  • Show Comments (0)

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

comment *

  • name *

  • email *

  • website *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Ads

You May Also Like

Brazil and Australia Sign Education Accord

The Ministers of Education of Brazil, Tarso Genro, and Australia, Brendan Nelson, have signed ...

GM Crops and Stem Cell Research Now Legal in Brazil

The Brazilian parliament has passed legislation allowing stem cell research and the planting and ...

Brazilian General Accuses Lula of Lack of Independence for Opposing US Bases

Brazil magnified the importance of the deployment of US troops in Colombian military bases, ...

Stock Market Investors Grow But Investment Shrinks in Brazil

From July to August, the number of natural people investing in the São Paulo ...

Sí£o Paulo, Brazil, Never Saw So Many Tourists: 11 Million

São Paulo, Brazil's largest city and the main economic hub in the country, received ...

Argentina Gets Brazilian Money to Buy Brazilian Planes

In an effort to save jobs at the Brazilian aircraft maker Embraer, Brazil has ...

Brazil in a Recession? No Way, Says Minister, Jobs Are Still Plentiful

Brazilian Finance Minister Guido Mantega has recently put down the disappointing performance of the ...

Strong Real and High Interest Rates Harm Brazil’s Car Production

Brazilian auto output and sales slumped in October, as high interest rates and a ...

Another Down Day for Brazilian Stocks

Latin American markets collectively receded, following a downturn in U.S. shares. U.S. Federal Reserve ...

Now We Know Why the PT Came to Power. To Preserve Bourgeois Rule.

The deep crisis of the Workers Party (PT) government of Luis Inácio Lula da ...