In Brazil Dilma Rousseff Grows in Polls and Ties with Presidential Candidate Serra

Presidential candidates Dilma Rousseff and José Serra Dilma Rousseff, Brazil’s ruling party presidential candidate, promised, if elected, continuity of current economic and financial policies to ensure growth and macro-economic stability. She also stated that Brazil was prepared for “a woman president.”

“Brazil will continue to grow with inclusion and upward social mobility”, said Rousseff during a conference in New York to US businessmen and politicians, which was followed by a press conference.

“A government of President Rousseff would ensure macroeconomic stability through monitoring with a policy of targets, exchange rate flexibility and fiscal control through the reduction of debt,” said the former cabinet chief virtually hand picked by president Lula, one of the most popular leaders of the country in half a century.

Regarding privatizations, Rousseff said that Brazil has defined “strategic areas” and mentioned several government managed corporations such as “Petrobras, Eletrobrás and other power related companies,” which will remain under state control.

However “we are open to a policy of inviting the private sector to participate in the construction of new hydroelectric plants, highways and other infrastructure, and extending concessions as long as they are cheaper to run than under our Public Works Department.”

On the specific question of the Brazilian Central Bank autonomy, the candidate promised that in the event of winning, “I will maintain the operational autonomy of the Central Bank”.

Finally she said that President Lula’s great legacy has been lifting millions of Brazilians out of poverty, “and that is a challenge to keep expanding.”

Public opinion polls show Ms Rousseff in a dead heat with opposition hopeful José Serra according to the latest DataFolha poll released, matching a similar trend in recent competing polls.

Rousseff climbed 7 points from DataFolha’s April voter survey, to win 37% of the 2,660 voters’ questioned across the country on Friday. Former São Paulo Governor Serra dropped five points from the April tally to even with Rousseff at 37% support ahead of the October election. The poll had a 2 percentage points plus or minus margin of error.

The latest results of the DataFolha poll followed a trend that has been unfolding in other polls in recent days. Rousseff has been gaining ground on Serra thanks to a strong economy and support from the popular Lula.

The two main candidates are followed in the DataFolha survey by Green Party candidate Marina Silva with 12% of vote intention.

Mercopress

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