Brazil’s Dictatorship: It All Started with a Referendum

Brazil's military regime The proposed division of the state of Pará in northern Brazil into three states was turned down in a plebiscite. At least for now there will not be the new states of Carajás and Tapajós.

Pará’s Regional Electoral Court released final numbers showing that 66.6% of the voters in the state had rejected the proposed division. Out of 4,848,000 eligible voters, 1.2 million abstained – around 25%.

It is estimated that the plebiscite cost R$19 million, including the cost of deploying federal troops to some 16 locations in the state.

The plebiscite on the division of the state of Pará is the fifth such vote since 1963 in Brazil. There was one other plebiscite, in 1993, and three referendums, in 1963, 2005 and 2010.

The difference between the two types of direct popular consultation is that a referendum is a vote on whether or not to accept, or ratify, a change that has taken place, while a plebiscite is a vote on whether or not to make a change.

The 1963 referendum was to ratify the parliamentary system that had been in place since 1961. At stake was how and if the vice president at the time, João Goulart, would run the government after the resignation of Jânio Quadros.

The decision by the voters to revoke the parliamentary system and give Goulart ample presidential powers had a dire sequel: twenty years of military dictatorship from 1964 to 1985.

In 1993, Brazilians once again had a chance to pick their form of government: a monarchy, parliamentary or republican presidential. The latter won.

In 2005 there was a plebiscite on the prohibition of the sale of arms and ammunition. It was rejected by 64% of the voters.

Finally, last year (2010), there was a referendum in the state of Acre regarding the use or not of daylight savings time.

The voters rejected it and at the moment, with daylight savings time in effect in Brasília, clocks in Acre are two hour behind clocks in the capital of the nation.

ABr

Tags:

  • Show Comments (0)

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

comment *

  • name *

  • email *

  • website *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Ads

You May Also Like

Brazil: Venezuela’s Oil Financed Rio’s Carnaval Champ

The Vila Isabel samba group, backed by Venezuelan oil money, was declared Carnaval champion ...

Left Is Right

President-elect Lula is honest, passionate, smart, and charming. Forget his lack of formal education. ...

Bolivia Accuses Brazil of Using Venezuela to Get Cheaper Gas Prices

The president of Bolivia’s state petroleum company said Monday, February 20, that suggestions Brazil ...

For Brazilians Oil Self Sufficiency Doesn’t Means Lower Price at the Pump

On Friday, state owned Petrobras officially announced that Brazil is self-sufficient in petroleum production ...

Despite US Slowdown, Smooth Sailing Forecasted for Brazil

The global economy is expected to grow less in 2006, but the slowdown in ...

From Brazil Israeli Leader Charges Iran with Buying Influence Around World

In an interview from Brazil with the Spanish newspaper La Vanguardia, the president of ...

Women from 12 Countries Gather in Brazil Looking for Gender Equality

Over 50% of the world’s food is produced by women, according to data from ...

Lula and Brother, Two Paths in Brazilian Politics

Two brothers were close companions throughout their lives. Only a few years apart in ...

Brazil’s Jobless Rate Still High: 10.8%

Unemployment rate reached 10.8% in March, in the six largest metropolitan areas of Brazil. ...

Brazil’s Embraer Opens Full-Service Center in the US for Its Executive Jets

Brazilian aircraft maker Embraer has just opened at Phoenix-Mesa Gateway Airport, in Mesa, Arizona, ...