While Sales of Domestic Cars in Brazil Fall by 2.8%, Imported Vehicles Jump 30%

BMW The amount of domestically-made vehicles licensed in Brazil in 2011 dropped when compared to 2010. According to figures disclosed this Thursday (January 5) by the National Association of Vehicle Manufacturers (Anfavea), 2,775,221 units were licensed in 2011, a 2.8% decline over the preceding year.

On the other hand, the number of imported automobiles licensed during the period grew by 30%, and reached 858,027. The market grew by a total of 3.4% in 2011, with 3,633,248 vehicles licensed (including automobiles, light commercial vehicles, buses and trucks).

Production and exports also increased in 2011. Last year, 3,406,150 units were manufactured in the country, 0.7% less than in 2010, when the industry made 3,381,728 units.

Exports increased by 7.7%, from 502,754 units shipped in 2010 to 541,568 units in 2011. Export revenues reached US$ 12.3 billion, 16.8% more than the 2010 figure, which was US$ 10.53 billion.

Despite the increase, the amount of vehicles exported was lower than that of imported vehicles, which accounted for 23.6% of all new vehicles licensed in Brazil in 2011.

At a press conference held in December, the Anfavea president, Cledorvino Belini, forecasted that in 2012 exports should be lower, at around 510,000 units. He explained that the new tariffs for the Tax on Industrialized Products (IPI) on imported autos should cause the demand for domestic cars to increase.

The industry figures disclosed by the Anfavea this Thursday show that the share of bi-fuel autos in the total number of vehicles licensed decreased, from 86.4% in 2010 to 83.1% in 2011, and there was an increase in both the number of gasoline-only vehicles (from 8.4% to 11%) and diesel-fueled vehicles (from 5.2% to 5.9%).

The market share of 1.0-litre engine vehicles also dropped. In 2010, these so-called popular autos accounted for 50.8% of all vehicles licensed. In 2011, the rate was 45.2%. During the period, more automobiles with 1,000- to 2,000-litre engines (from 48% in 2010 to 53.2% in 2011) and engines above 2,000 liters (from 1.2% to 1.5%).

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